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[Illustration: ADMIRAL GEORGE DEWEY, U.S.N.]


DEWEY

AND OTHER

NAVAL COMMANDERS.


BY

EDWARD S. ELLIS, A.M.

Author of "A History of the World," "The People's Standard History
of the United States," "A History of the State of New York," "Deerfoot
Series," "Log Cabin Series," Etc.


NEW YORK

HURST & COMPANY

PUBLISHERS

Copyright, 1899,

BY

JOHN HOVENDON.




CONTENTS. Page.

Introduction 5

CHAPTER I.

Admiral George Dewey--The Birth and Boyhood of
George Dewey. 7


CHAPTER II.

Dewey in the War for the Union. 17


CHAPTER III.

Dewey in the War with Spain. 35


CHAPTER IV.

The Revolutionary Battles--Birth of the American
Navy--The Privateers--Capture of New Providence, in
the Bahamas--Paul Jones--A Clever Exploit--A
Skilful Escape--Fine Seamanship--An Audacious
Scheme. 52


CHAPTER V.

A Daring Attempt by Captain Paul Jones--Why It
Failed--A Bold Scheme--Why It Did Not Succeed--The
Fight Between the _Ranger_ and _Drake_. 63


CHAPTER VI.

One of the Most Memorable Sea Fights Ever Known--The
Wonderful Exploit of Captain Paul Jones. 71


CHAPTER VII.

Our Naval War with France--The Tribute Paid to the
Barbary States by Christian Nations--War Declared
Against the United States by Tripoli--Bainbridge,
Decatur, Stewart, Dale and Preble. 88


CHAPTER VIII.

The First Serious Engagement--Loss of
the _Philadelphia_--The Scheme of Captain
Bainbridge--Exploit of Lieutenant Decatur. 97


CHAPTER IX.

Bombardment of Tripoli--Treacherous Act of a Turkish
Captain--A Quick Retribution at the Hands of Captain
Decatur. 108


CHAPTER X.

The Bomb Ketch--A Terrible Missile--Frightful
Catastrophe--Diplomacy in Place of War--Peace. 114


CHAPTER XI.

The War of 1812--Cause of the War of 1812--Discreditable
Work of the Land Forces--Brilliant Record of the
Navy--The _Constitution_--Captain Isaac Hull--Battle
Between the _Constitution_ and _Guerriere_--Winning
a Wager. 122


CHAPTER XII.

Jacob Jones--The _Wasp_ and the _Frolic_--James
Biddle--The _Hornet_ and the _Penguin_--A
Narrow Escape. 133


CHAPTER XIII.

Captains Carden and Decatur--Cruise of the
_Macedonian_--Battle with the Frigate _United
States_--Decatur's Chivalry. 142


CHAPTER XIV.

Occasional American Defeats as Well as Victories--Captain
Decatur's Misfortune--The _Chesapeake_ and _Shannon_. 152


CHAPTER XV.

David Porter--A Clever Feat--Numerous Captures by
the _Essex_--Her Remarkable Cruise in the Pacific--Her
Final Capture. 167


CHAPTER XVI.

Oliver Hazard Perry--Prompt and Effective Work--"We Have
Met the Enemy and They Are Ours"--Death of Perry. 176


CHAPTER XVII.

A Hero of the Olden Days--Cruise of the
_Constitution_--Her Capture of the _Cyane_ and
_Levant_--Reminiscences
of Admiral Stewart--His Last Days. 185


CHAPTER XVIII.

Captures Made After the Signing of the Treaty of
Peace--The Privateers--Exploit of the _General
Armstrong_--Its Far-Reaching Result. 197


CHAPTER XIX.

Lesser Wars--Resentment of the Barbary States--The
War with Algiers--Captain Decatur's Vigorous
Course--His Astonishing Success as a Diplomat. 206


CHAPTER XX.

Piracy in the West Indies--Its Cause--Means by Which
It Was Wiped Out--Piracy in the Mediterranean. 216


CHAPTER XXI.

The Qualla Battoo Incident. 226


CHAPTER XXII.

Wilkes's Exploring Expedition. 236


CHAPTER XXIII.

The War for the Union--A New Era for the United
States Navy--Opening of the Great Civil War--John
Lorimer Worden--Battle Between the _Monitor_
and _Merrimac_--Death of Worden. 246


CHAPTER XXIV.

Two Worthy Sons--William D. Porter--The Career of
Admiral David Dixon Porter. 259


CHAPTER XXV.

Charles Stewart Boggs--His Coolness in the Presence
of Danger--His Desperate Fight Below New Orleans--His
Subsequent Services. 271


CHAPTER XXVI.

John Ancrum Winslow--His Early Life and
Training--The Famous Battle Between the _Kearsarge_
and _Alabama_. 279


CHAPTER XXVII.

An Unexpected Preacher--Andrew Hull Foote--His
Character and Early Career--His Brilliant Services
in the War for the Union. 295


CHAPTER XXVIII.

A Man Devoid of Fear--William Barker Cushing--Some
of His Exploits--The Blowing Up of the
_Albemarle_--His Sad Death. 312


CHAPTER XXIX.

The Greatest of Naval Heroes--David Glasgow Farragut. 327


CHAPTER XXX.

The Spanish-American War--The Movement Against
Cuba--The Destruction of Cervera's Fleet--Admiral
Sampson--Admiral Schley--"Fighting Bob" Evans--Commodore
John C. Watson--Commodore John
W. Philip--Lieutenant Commander Richard Wainwright. 343



INTRODUCTION.


I purpose telling you in the following pages about the exploits of the
gallant men who composed the American Navy, beginning with the
Revolution and ending with the story of their wonderful deeds in our
late war with Spain. You can never read a more interesting story, nor
one that will make you feel prouder of your birthright. While our
patriot armies have done nobly, it is none the less true that we never
could have become one of the greatest nations in the world without the
help of our heroic navy. Our warships penetrated into all waters of the
globe, and made people, whether barbarous or civilized, respect and fear
the Stars and Stripes.

This is due in a great measure to the bravery of our naval heroes, who
did not fear to meet Great Britain, the "mistress of the seas," when her
navy outnumbered ours one hundred to one. England is now our best
friend, and no doubt will always remain so. Never again can there be war
between her and us, and it will not be strange that one of these days,
if either gets into trouble, the American and English soldiers will
"drink from the same canteen," which is another way of saying they will
fight side by side, as they did a short time ago in Samoa. All the
same, our brethren across the ocean are very willing to own that we
fought them right well. Indeed, they think all the more of us for having
done so. You know that one brave man always likes another who is as
brave as himself, just as Northerners and Southerners love each other,
and are all united under one flag, which one side defended and the other
fought against, through long years, terrible years from 1861 to 1865.

The decks of no ships have ever been trodden by braver men than our
American sailors. There are no more heroic deeds in all history than
those of Paul Jones, Porter, Hull, Decatur, Perry, Cushing, Farragut,
Worden, Dewey, Schley, Evans, Philip, Hobson and scores of others, who
have braved what seemed certain death for the glory of our flag. Many
gave up their lives in its defence, and their names form one of the
proudest and most cherished heritages that can descend to a grateful
country.

So, I repeat, I am sure you will be interested and instructed in
learning the story of the heroes who have done so much for us; and their
example cannot fail to inspire you with loftier heroism, greater
devotion, and deeper resolve to do all you can for our favored land,
which is the fairest that ever sun shone upon.

E.S.E.




ADMIRAL GEORGE DEWEY.


CHAPTER I.

THE BIRTH AND BOYHOOD OF GEORGE DEWEY.


The name of Vermont recalls the gallant "Green Mountain Boys," who
proved their sturdy patriotism not only in the Revolution, but before
those stormy days broke over the land. In the colonial times the section
was known as the "New Hampshire Grants," and was claimed by both New
York and New Hampshire, but Vermont refused to acknowledge the authority
of either, even after New York, in 1764, secured a decision in her favor
from King George, and set vigorously to work to compel the settlers to
pay a second time for their lands. The doughty pioneers would have none
of it, and roughly handled the New York officers sent thither. In 1777
Vermont formally declared her independence and adopted a State
constitution. Then, since the Revolution was on, Ethan Allen and the
rest of the "Green Mountain Boys" turned in and helped whip the
redcoats. That being done, Vermont again asserted her independence,
compelled New York to recognize it in 1789, and she was admitted to the
Union in 1791.

It was away back in 1633 that the first Englishman bearing the name of
Dewey arrived in Massachusetts with a number of other emigrants. They
settled in Dorchester, and in 1636 Thomas Dewey, as he was named,
removed to Windsor, Connecticut, where he died in 1648, leaving a widow
and five children. Following down the family line, we come to the birth
of Julius Yemans Dewey, August 22, 1801, at Berlin, Vermont. He studied
medicine, practiced his profession at Montpelier, the capital, and
became one of the most respected and widely known citizens of the State.
He was married three times, and by his first wife had three sons and one
daughter. The latter was Mary, and the sons were Charles, Edward, and
George, the last of whom became the famous Admiral of the American navy
and the hero of the late war between our country and Spain.



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