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M. ASHLEY.


I know Mrs. Griffing to be capable and humane, and very devoted
to the colored race. I hope that her services may be secured.

CHARLES SUMNER.


I most cheerfully join in this recommendation.

H. WILSON,
J. N. GRIMES.


I fully concur in the above, and hope that Mrs. Griffing will
receive a conspicuous place in the Freedman's Bureau. She is the
best qualified of any person within my knowledge; her whole heart
is in the work.

B. F. WADE, SOLOMON FOOT,
IRA HARRIS, E. D. MORGAN,
W. P. FESSENDEN.


I most fully concur.

J. V. DRIGGS,
T. W. FERRY.


I fully concur in all that is said within in behalf of Mrs.
Griffing, and earnestly commend her to the favor sought.

GEO. W. JULIAN.


WASHINGTON, _July 9, 1869_.

Mrs. Griffing has for several years devoted herself with great
industry, intelligence, and success to the freed people in the
District of Columbia, and in this service she has accomplished
more good than any other one individual within my acquaintance.
When the War Department was in my charge, she rendered very
efficient aid of a humane character to relieve the wants and
sufferings of destitute freed people, and was untiring in her
benevolent exertions. Property for distribution was often placed
in her hands, or under her directions, and she was uniformly
trustworthy and skillful in its management and administration. In
my judgment, she is entitled to the most full confidence and
trust.

EDWIN M. STANTON.


JEFFERSON, OHIO, _Nov. 12, 1869_.

MY DEAR MRS. GRIFFING:--On my return from Washington I found your
kind letter of the 28th, ult. I regret much that I did not meet
with you at Washington. I know your merits. I know that no person
in America has done so much for the cause of humanity for the
last four years as you have. Your disinterested labors have saved
hundreds of poor human beings not only the greatest destitution
and misery, but from actual starvation and death. I also know
that in doing this you have not only devoted your whole time, but
all the property you have. And I know, too, that your labors are
just as necessary now as they ever have been. Others know all
this as well as I do. Secretary Stanton can vouch for it all, and
I can not doubt that Congress will not only pay you for what you
have done, but give you a position where this necessary work may
be done by you effectually. This is the very thing that ought to
be done at once. Since the Bureau has been abolished it will be
impossible to get along with the great influx of imbecility and
destitution which gathers and centers in Washington every
winter, without some one being appointed to see to it, and
certainly everybody knows that there is no one so competent for
this work as yourself. To this end I will do whatever I can, but
you know that I am now out of place, and have no influence at
Court, but whatever I can do to effect so desirable an object
will be done.

Truly yours, B. F. WADE.


SENATE CHAMBER, _April 2_.

DEAR MADAM:--I have your note of the 31st, and am very sorry to
hear that there is so much distress in the city. I shall endeavor
to bring the charter up as soon as I have an opportunity; but
while this trial is pending,[30] it is improbable that any
legislative business will be done. I am as anxious as you are to
secure its adoption.

Yours truly, CHARLES SUMNER.

MRS. J. S. GRIFFING, Washington.


BOSTON, _27th July, 1869_.

DEAR MADAM:--The statement or memorial which you placed in my
hands was never printed. It is, probably, now on the files of the
Senate. I wish I could help your effort with the Secretary of
War. You must persevere. If Gen. Rawlins understands the case, he
will do all that you desire. Accept my best wishes, and believe
me, faithfully yours,

CHARLES SUMNER.


Will Mrs. Griffing let Mr. Sumner know what institution or person
should disburse the money appropriated?

SENATE CHAMBER,
Tuesday.


LETTERS ON THE FREEDMAN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION.

WASHINGTON, _April 8, '71_.

_To the Mayor and Board of Common Council, City of Washington,
District of Columbia_:

MESSRS.:--I have the honor to state that the aged, sick,
crippled, and blind persons, for whom the National Freedman's
Relief Association of this District partially provides, are at
this time in very great destitution, many of them in extreme
suffering for want of food and fuel. The Association has provided
clothing. It is now twelve weeks since the Government
appropriation for their temporary support for the last year was
exhausted. This Association has by soliciting contributions, up
to this time, relieved the most extreme cases, that otherwise
must have died; but the want of food is so great among at least a
thousand of these, not one of whom is able _to labor_ for a
support, that it is impossible to provide the absolute relief
they must have, by further contributions from the charitable and
the humane.

I would therefore most earnestly appeal in their behalf, that the
Hon. Council and Mayor will appropriate from the market fund for
their temporary relief one thousand dollars, to be disbursed by
the above-named association, which sum will enable these
destitute persons to subsist until, as is hoped and believed,
Congress will make the usual special appropriation for their
partial temporary support. This Association to report the use of
such money to the Mayor and Common Council of the City of
Washington, D. C.

Very respectfully, J. S. GRIFFING,
_General Agent N. F. R. Association, D. C._


TRIBUNE OFFICE, NEW YORK, _Sept. 7, 1870_.

MRS. GRIFFING:--In my judgment you and others who wish to
befriend the blacks crowded into Washington, do them great
injury. Had they been told years ago, "You _must_ find work; go
out and seek it," they would have been spared much misery. They
are an easy, worthless race, taking no thought for the morrow,
and liking to lean on those who befriend them. Your course
aggravates their weaknesses, when you should raise their ambition
and stimulate them to self-reliance. Unless you change your
course speedily and signally, the swarming of blacks to the
District will increase, and the argument that Slavery is their
natural condition will be immeasurably strengthened. So long as
they look to others to calculate and provide for them, they are
not truly free. If there be any woman capable of earning wages
who would rather some one else than herself should pay her
passage to the place where she can have work, then she needs
reconstruction and awakening to a just and honest self-reliance.

Yours, HORACE GREELEY.

MRS. J. S. GRIFFING, Washington, D. C.


_Sept. 12, 1870_.
HORACE GREELEY:

DEAR SIR:--Much as I respect your judgment, and admire your
candor, I must express entire dissent with your views in
reference to those who are laboring to befriend the Freedmen, and
also of your estimate of the character of the black race.

When you condemn my work for the old slaves, who can not labor,
and are "crowded into Washington" by force of events
uncontrollable, as a "great injury," I am at a loss to perceive
your estimate of any and all benevolent action. If, to provide
houses, food, clothing, and other physical comforts, to those
broken-down aged slaves whom we have liberated in their declining
years, when all their strength is gone, and for whom no home,
family friendship, or subsistence is furnished; if this is a
"great injury," in my judgment there is no call for alms-house,
hospital, home, or asylum in human society, and all
appropriations of sympathy and material aid are worse than
useless, and demand your earnest rebuke and discountenance, and
to the unfortunates crowded into these institutions, you should
say, "You must find work, go out and seek it." So far as an
humble individual can be, I am substituting to these a freedman's
(relief) bureau; sanitary commission; church sewing society, to
aid the poor; orphan asylum; old people's home; hospital and
alms-house for the sick and the blind; minister-at-large, to
visit the sick, console the dying, and bury the dead; and wherein
I fail, and perhaps you discriminate, is the want of wealthy,
popular, and what is called honorable associations. Were these at
my command, with the field before me, it would be easy to
illustrate the practical use as well as the divine origin of the
Golden Rule.

If, in your criticism, you refer to my secondary department in
which I have labored to furnish employment to the Freedmen both
in the District and out, is it not a direct reflection upon all
efforts made for the distribution of labor?



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