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VEDDER wanted the gentleman's words recorded.

Mr. GRAVES: I was about to say that educated women should be
permitted to go to the ballot-box, and by their votes help to
maintain our form of government. Why is it that every father in
this country is educating his daughter as well as his son in all
branches of science? Why does he expend his money in preparing
his daughter for the most responsible positions, and then deny
her the right to exercise her powers in the most intricate and
exalted of sciences--that of government? I know it is said that
the right of suffrage conferred on woman would destroy all
domestic peace; which is to say a man can not tolerate an equal
at his fireside. Does domestic peace exist in the exact ratio of
a woman's inferiority to the man she calls her husband? The
intelligent, educated wife must exert an influence for good over
the husband. The wise, far-seeing, self-disciplined mother must
exert an influence for good over her children; why, then, may not
this influence be equally potent in the State?

The resolution was lost.

The struggle in New York ended, all thoughts were turned towards
Kansas, where, as already shown, the friends of woman suffrage were
doomed to another disappointment. However, the year was one of active
effort; tracts and petitions were diligently circulated; a thorough
campaign made in Kansas; a series of meetings held in all the chief
cities from Leavenworth to New York, and a newspaper established,
demanding far more time and money than its founders anticipated. Thus
the intervening months were fully occupied until the May
Anniversaries, when all religious and reformatory associations were
accustomed to hold their annual meetings in New York city.


EQUAL RIGHTS ANNIVERSARY.

The American Equal Rights Association held its annual meeting in
Cooper Institute, New York, May 14, 1868. Its officers[106], with but
few changes, were the same as before.

The HUTCHINSON FAMILY, the branch of John, was present, and with
their sister, Abby Hutchinson Patten, opened the meeting with
their song, "We Come to Greet You." Lucy Stone read a letter from
John Stuart Mill, expressing sympathy with the movement. Letters
were also read from Rev. Robert Collyer of Chicago, Maria
Giddings, the daughter of Hon. Joshua R. Giddings, of Ohio,
Frances Dana Gage, and several others. Miss Anthony invited all
delegates of Equal Rights Societies to seats on the platform; she
also moved that Mrs. Rose, Mrs. Stanton, Mr. Burleigh and Mr.
Foster be a committee to prepare resolutions.

HENRY B. BLACKWELL reported the success of the campaign of the
women of this Society in Kansas, where Rev. Olympia Brown, Lucy
Stone, Mrs. Stanton and Susan B. Anthony had canvassed. Their
eloquence and determination gave great promise of success; but in
an inopportune moment, Horace Greeley and others saw fit in the
Constitutional Convention to report unfavorably on the
proposition to extend suffrage to the women of the Empire State,
and that influenced the sentiment of the younger Western States,
and their enterprise was crushed. Even the Republicans in Kansas,
after witnessing this example, set their faces against the
extension of suffrage to women. The negroes got but a few more
votes than did the women.

LUCY STONE gave a resume of the progress of the cause in this
country and in England. Col. Higginson and Mrs. Rose made
excellent remarks. "Keep the ball rolling" was gracefully
rendered by Mrs. Abby Hutchinson Patton, the whole audience
joining in the chorus. Mrs. Stone presented two forms of petition
to Congress; one to extend suffrage to women in the District of
Columbia and the Territories, the other for the submission of a
proposition for a 16th Amendment to prohibit the States from
disfranchising citizens on account of sex. Frederick Douglass
made an acceptable speech in favor of the petitions. The
President announced that Mrs. Patten headed the subscription list
to aid the association in its work for the coming year with $50.
Miss Anthony presented the various tracts published by the
Society, and _The Revolution_, urging the friends of the cause to
aid in the circulation of the paper, as it was the only one owned
and edited by women, wholly devoted to the cause of Equal Rights.
Rev. Dr. Blanchard, of Brooklyn, opened the evening session with
prayer; a resolution was proposed and adopted, on the death of
James Mott, husband of Lucretia Mott, President of the first
Woman's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls.

Rev. OLYMPIA BROWN: It is said that Nature is against us. In the
Massachusetts Legislature, Mr. Dana, Chairman of the Committee
before whom we had a hearing, said: "Nature is against it. It
will take the romance out of life to grant what you desire"! If
the romance of life is a falsehood and a fiction, we want to get
back to truth, nature and God. We all love liberty and desire to
possess it. No one worthy the name of man or woman is willing to
surrender liberty and become subservient to another. Woman may be
shut out of politics by law, but her influence will be felt
there. Some of our leading reformers work for other objects
first; the enfranchisement of the negro, the eight hour law, the
temperance cause; and leave the woman suffrage question in the
background; but woman will be enfranchised in spite of them. It
is no use to tell us to wait until something else is done. _Now_
is the accepted time for the enfranchisement of woman. The
abolition of slavery was thought to be premature, but that
mistake is now clearly seen. Now is the time for every
disfranchised class to make known its wants. The Republican party
is no better than the Democratic. It sacrificed principle and
nominated a man for President to _save the party_, whom they were
afraid the Democrats would nominate if they did not! The
Republican party controlled Kansas, and yet repudiated woman's
rights in the canvass of last year. We want a party (and would
like the Republican party) who will adopt a platform of Universal
Suffrage for every color and every sex. "The Republican party
must be saved," is the cry; but its great danger is in not being
true to principle. We will push on, keeping in view the rights of
our common nature until woman is the peer of man in every sphere
of life.

ELIZABETH A. KINGSLEY, of Philadelphia, CHARLES BURLEIGH, Rev.
HENRY BLANCHARD and Mrs. ROSE made brief addresses.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS deprecated the seeming assertion of Rev. O. B.
Frothingham, that one good cause was in opposition to another. I
champion the right of the negro to vote. It is with us a matter
of life and death, and therefore can not be postponed. I have
always championed woman's right to vote; but it will be seen that
the present claim for the negro is one of the most _urgent_
necessity. The assertion of the right of women to vote meets
nothing but ridicule; there is no deep seated malignity in the
hearts of the people against her; but name the right of the negro
to vote, all hell is turned loose and the Ku-klux and Regulators
hunt and slay the unoffending black man. The government of this
country loves women. They are the sisters, mothers, wives and
daughters of our rulers; but the negro is loathed. Women should
not censure Mr. Phillips, Mr. Greeley, or Mr. Tilton, all have
spoken eloquently for woman's rights. We are all talking for
woman's rights, and we should be just to all our friends and
enemies. There is a difference between the Republican and
Democratic parties.

OLYMPIA BROWN: What is it?

FREDERICK DOUGLASS: The Democratic party has, during the whole
war, been in sympathy with the rebellion, while the Republican
party has supported the Government.

OLYMPIA BROWN: How is it now?

FREDERICK DOUGLASS: The Democratic party opposes impeachment, and
desires a white man's government.

OLYMPIA BROWN: What is the difference in _principle_ between the
position of the Democratic party opposing the enfranchisement of
2,000,000 negro men, and the Republican party opposing the
emancipation of 17,000,000 white women?

FREDERICK DOUGLASS: The Democratic party opposes suffrage to
both: but the Republican party is in favor of enfranchising the
negro, and is largely in favor of enfranchising woman. Where is
the Democrat who favors woman suffrage? (A voice in the audience,
"Train!") Yes, he hates the negro, and that is what stimulates
him to substitute the cry of emancipation for women. The negro
needs suffrage to protect his life and property, and to ensure
him respect and education. He needs it for the safety of
reconstruction and the salvation of the Union; for his own
elevation from the position of a drudge to that of an influential
member of society. If you want women to forget and forsake
frivolity, and the negro to take pride in becoming a useful and
respectable member of society, give them both the ballot.

OLYMPIA BROWN: Why did Republican Kansas vote down negro
suffrage?

FREDERICK DOUGLASS: Because of your ally, George Francis Train!

OLYMPIA BROWN: How about Minnesota without Train? The Republican
party is a party and cares for nothing but party! It has
repudiated both negro suffrage and woman suffrage.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS: Minnesota lacked only 1,200 votes of carrying
negro suffrage. All the Democrats voted against it, while only a
small portion of the Republicans did so. And this was
substantially the same in Ohio and Connecticut.



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