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You set out to annoy me in the
Constitutional Convention, and you did it effectually. I saw in the
manner my wife's petition was presented, that Mr. Curtis was acting
under instructions. I saw the reporters prick up their ears and knew
that my report and Mrs. Greeley's petition would come out together,
with large headings in the city papers, and probably be called out by
the newsboys in the street."

Turning to Mrs. Stanton, he said, "You are so tenacious about your own
name, why did you not inscribe my wife's maiden name, Mary Cheney
Greeley on her petition?" "Because," I replied, "I wanted all the
world to know that it was the wife of Horace Greeley who protested
against her husband's report." "Well," said he, "I understand the
animus of that whole proceeding, and now let me tell you what I intend
to do. I have given positive instructions that no word of praise shall
ever again be awarded you in the _Tribune_, and that if your name is
ever necessarily mentioned, it shall be as Mrs. Henry B. Stanton!" And
so it has been ever since.

From that time Mr. Greeley was seemingly hostile to the woman suffrage
movement, just as he was toward the anti-slavery cause, after the
Abolitionists in rolling up 60,000 votes for James G. Birney, defeated
Henry Clay, and gave the ascendency to the Democrats by electing Polk.
Clay being a strong Protectionist was a great favorite with Mr.
Greeley, and his defeat was a sore disappointment, and for years he
denounced Abolitionists individually and collectively in his scathing
editorials. Still in his happier moods he firmly believed in the civil
and political equality of both women and negroes.

[103] This amendment was on the following section of Mr. Greeley's
Report:

SECTION I. Every man of the age of twenty-one years who shall have
been an inhabitant of this State for one year next preceding an
election, and for the last thirty days a citizen of the United States,
and a resident of the election district where he may offer his vote,
shall be entitled to vote at such election, in said district and not
elsewhere, for all officers elected by the people.

_Provided_, That idiots, lunatics, persons under guardianship, felons,
and persons convicted of bribery, unless pardoned or otherwise
restored to civil rights, shall not be entitled to vote....

[104] The Albany _Evening Journal_ of July 25, 1867, in speaking of
the "Suffrage Discussion," said: "All men and women have the right to
life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. If when deprived of the
ballot the consequence is that this inalienable right is abridged,
then society owes it to the class thus practically enslaved to bestow
suffrage upon them. At the South there is no safety for the negro from
oppressive laws but in the ballot. It is idle to argue ignorance.
Political enfranchisement is the best educator."

[105] Beals, Bell, Corning, Curtis, Duganne, Farnum, Field, Folger,
Fowler, Graves, Hadley, Hammond, Kinney, Lapham, M. H. Lawrence, Pond,
Tucker, Vedder, Wales.

[106] _President_--Lucretia Mott.

_Vice-Presidents_--Elizabeth Cady Stanton, N.Y.; Frederick Douglass,
N.Y.; Henry Ward Beecher, N.Y.; Martha C. Wright N.Y.; Elizabeth B.
Chace. R.I.; C. Prince, Ct; Frances D. Gage, N.Y.; Robert Purvis,
Penn.; Parker Pillsbury, N.H.; Antoinette Brown Blackwell, N.J.;
Josephine S. Griffing, D.C.; Thomas Garrett, Del.; Stephen H. Camp,
Ohio; Euphemia Cochrane, Mich.; Mary A. Livermore, Ill.; Mrs. Isaac H.
Sturgeon, Mo.; Amelia Bloomer, Iowa; Helen Ekin Starrett, Kansas;
Virginia Penny, Kentucky; Olympia Brown, Mass.

_Corresponding Secretary_--Mary E. Gage.

_Recording Secretaries_--Henry B. Blackwell, Hattie Purvis.

_Treasurer_--John J. Merritt.

_Executive Committee_--Lucy Stone, Edward S. Bunker, Elizabeth R.
Tilton, Ernestine L. Rose, Robert J. Johnston, Edwin A. Studwell, Anna
Cromwell Field, Susan B. Anthony, Theodore Tilton, Margaret E.
Winchester, Abby Hutchinson Patton.

[107]
ST. LOUIS, May 4, 1868.

MRS. E. C. STANTON--_Dear Friend_: Our gentlemen friends urge us to
memorialize Congress on the question of Suffrage in the District. Well
knowing how a single petition is suffocated, would it not be well for
all the States to unite, and be presented at the same time? New York,
being the banner State, must head the move and be spokesman. Out list
of names is waiting the interminable Impeachment to be handed in (oh,
for old Ben. Wade in the White House), but it seems to me one State
should not go alone; if all the State organizations were notified to
send in their lists immediately to whoever you think will be most
likely to do justice to the cause, we could make quite a formidable
display combined.

Your sincere friend, MRS. FRANCIS MINOR,
President of the St. Louis Woman's Suffrage Association.

* * * * *

ENFRANCHISEMENT IN THE DISTRICT.--MAY 21, 1868.--_To the Friends of
Equal Rights_: The whole government of the District of Columbia is to
be revised by Congress, in consequence of the expiration of local
charters, within the next nine months. A rare opportunity is thus
afforded to bring the enfranchisement of woman to the attention of
Congress and the country. We urge you to send in petitions as fast as
possible, with as many signatures as you can obtain. They should be
sent to Mrs. Josephine S. Griffing, 213 North Capitol street,
Washington, D. C., who will acknowledge their receipt and attend to
their presentation.

FORM OF PETITION.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in
Congress Assembled_:

The undersigned ----, of the ---- of ----, in the State of ----,
respectfully petition, that in your revision of the government of the
District of Columbia, you will protect the women of the District from
being debarred the exercise of their right of suffrage.


[Illustration: Jane Graham Jones.]




CHAPTER XXI.

RECONSTRUCTION.

The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments--Universal Suffrage and
Universal Amnesty the Key-note of Reconstruction--Gerrit Smith
and Wendell Phillips Hesitate--A Trying Period in the Woman
Suffrage Movement--Those Opposed to the word "Male" in the
Fourteenth Amendment Voted Down in Conventions--The Negro's
Hour--Virginia L. Minor on Suffrage in the District of
Columbia--Women Advised to be Silent--The Hypocrisy of the
Democrats preferable to that of the Republicans--Senator
Pomeroy's Amendment--Protests against a Man's Government--Negro
Suffrage a Political Necessity--Charles Sumner Opposed to the
Fourteenth Amendment, but Voted for it as a Party Measure--Woman
Suffrage for Utah--Discussion in the House as to who Constitute
Electors--Bills for Woman Suffrage presented by the Hon. George
W. Julian and Senators Wilson and Pomeroy--The Fifteenth
Amendment--Anna E. Dickinson's Suggestion--Opinions of Women on
the Fifteenth Amendment--The Sixteenth Amendment--Miss Anthony
chosen a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention July 4,
1868--Her Address Read by a Unanimous Vote--Horatio Seymour in
the Chair--Comments of the Press--The _Revolution_.


The war settled two questions: 1st. That we are a Nation, and not a
mere confederacy of States. 2d. That all "persons" born or naturalized
in the United States are "citizens," and stand equal before the law.
Freedom, United States citizenship, the limit of State authority, and
national protection of the fundamental rights of citizens in the
several States, are clearly set forth in the following amendments:

THIRTEENTH AMENDMENT, DECEMBER 18, 1865.

"1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a
punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly
convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place
subject to their jurisdiction."

"2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by
appropriate legislation."

FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT, JULY 28, 1868.

Section 1. "All persons born or naturalized in the United States
and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the
United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State
shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges
or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any
State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without
due process of law, nor deny to any person within its
jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws."

Section 2. "Representatives shall be apportioned among the
several States according to their respective numbers, counting
the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not
taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice
of electors for President and Vice-President of the United
States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial
officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof,
is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being
twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in
any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion or other
crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in
the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear
to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in
such State."

Section 3. "No person shall be a Senator or Representative in
Congress, or elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any
office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any
State, who, having previously taken an oath as a member of
Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member
of any State Legislature, or as an Executive or Judicial officer
of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States,
shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same,
or give aid or comfort to the enemies thereof.



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