A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
At all events the hypocrisy of Democrats
serves us a better purpose in the present emergency than does the
treachery of Republicans."

But with all their long-time friends against them; such as Charles
Sumner and Henry Wilson in the Senate, William Lloyd Garrison and
Gerrit Smith in reform, Horace Greeley and most of the Liberals in the
press, the position of the women seemed so untenable to the majority
that at times a sense of utter loneliness and desertion made the
bravest of them doubt the possibility of maintaining the struggle or
making themselves fairly understood. And yet, what was done was sound
in principle and wise in policy. Every argument made by Republicans
and Abolitionists for the enfranchisement of the negro was pertinent
for woman. As Mr. Sumner said to us years after he made that great
speech on "Equal rights to all," "substitute sex for color, and you
have the best speech I could make on your platform." Our cause was
wise too in policy, for never before had we such an opportunity to
compel intelligent opposition in the halls of legislation and in
conventions of the people. Black men were at the white heat of anxiety
and expectation; Abolitionists, with bated breath, watched every move
and vote in Congress; Republicans felt that on the success or defeat
of "negro suffrage" hung the life or death of their party; and all
alike feared the slightest influence that might turn the scale, and
deplored the seeming coalition of the women and the Democrats. Hence
what an hour to proclaim our principles of government upon their
broadest basis, and to keep up the discussion of woman suffrage at
every point with so formidable an opposition!

Few[109] only were equal to the emergency. Even in the Equal Rights
Conventions the slightest opposition to the XIV Amendment called out
hisses and denunciation, and all resolutions on that point were
promptly voted down. Mrs. Stanton and Miss Anthony were waylaid again
and again in the ante-rooms, and implored to avoid all discussions on
the pending amendments, and were persistently opposed by black men,
Abolitionists, Republicans and women who did not understand either the
principle or policy involved in the discussion. This opposition of the
few did not grow out of any hostility to "negro suffrage," for they
were all Abolitionists, and had labored untiringly for the
emancipation of the slaves; but they were opposed to the
enfranchisement of another class of ignorant men to be lifted above
their heads, to be their law-makers and Governors; to prescribe the
moral code and political status of their daughters. The hue and cry
against those who claimed that "that was the woman's hour," for
accepting the aid of Democrats in the establishment of a paper through
which they could plead their own case, were so many plausible pretexts
in the mouths of those who could not consistently attack their
principles of action. But from this opposition on all sides true woman
suffragists learned their power to stand alone, and to maintain the
right against large and honorable majorities.

Again said our professed friends we can carry "negro suffrage" now; it
is a political necessity; do not trammel us with another issue--this
done, depend upon it, men have too much chivalry to forget the
services of the loyal women all through the war, and through the long
political struggle in Congress. Women in our conventions echoed the
same assuring sentiments, and voted down resolutions of protest and
rebuke. They were deceived with the plausible promises made by
Republicans and Abolitionists--promises still unredeemed, for
Republicans have been busy ever since trying to save the life of their
party; and Abolitionists, with few exceptions, have thrown their
influence into Labor Reform, Temperance, Finance, and Literature. But
of what do you complain, asked our statesmen. Of many things, we
replied:

1st. Our National Constitution was broad and liberal in letter and
spirit, put no limits on suffrage, made no distinctions in sex, until
the Republicans, by their amendments, introduced the word "male," and
thus blocked woman's path to equality.

2d. Republicans in Congress either suppressed our petitions for
suffrage, or presented them under protest, after holding them for
weeks in their possession.

3d. By their speeches and votes in Congress, and their decisions in
the courts on questions involving our civil and political rights, they
have stultified their own grand declarations of the equal rights of
citizens in a republic.

When the XIV Amendment was first proposed, the Hon. Charles Sumner
opposed it, because, he said, there was already enough of Justice,
Liberty, and Equality in the Constitution to protect the humblest
citizen under our flag. He had always taken the ground that the
Constitution was an Anti-Slavery document, hence to vote for an
amendment was to contradict his former position. We opposed the
amendments because, in the Constitution as it was there were no
distinctions of sex recognized, while the amendments declaring
"manhood suffrage," established an aristocracy of sex. However, in due
season, Mr. Sumner withdrew his opposition; and without changing his
opinion, voted for the amendments because negro suffrage was a party
measure, and the political necessity of the hour. We, having no party,
no votes, no political right but to petition and discuss the measures
up for consideration, saw no reason for changing our opinions, hence
we used the best possible means to keep up the agitation until the
amendments were passed, and beyond reconsideration. Nevertheless, in
the midst of this general hostility, the sound policy of the agitation
carried on against the Republican party and its measures was evident
in the numerous bills some of its liberal members soon after presented
in Congress. In _The Revolution_, December 10, 1868, we find the
following:

NOW'S THE HOUR.--Not the "negro's hour" alone, but everybody's
hour. All honor to Senator Pomeroy! He has taken the first step
to redeem the Constitution from all odious distinctions on
account of race or sex. He lost no time in presenting, at the
opening of Congressional proceedings, the following as an
amendment to the Federal Constitution to regulate suffrage
throughout the country:

Article 15. The basis of suffrage in the United States shall
be that of citizenship; and all native or naturalized
citizens shall enjoy the same rights and privileges of the
elective franchise; but each State shall determine by law
the age of a citizen and the time of residence required for
the exercise of the right of suffrage which shall apply
equally to all citizens; and also shall make all laws
concerning the times, places, and manner of holding
elections.

Laid on the table and ordered to be printed.

Now let the work of petitioning and agitating for this amendment
be prosecuted with a vigor and energy unknown before. And let
Senator Pomeroy be honored with receiving and presenting to the
Senate such a deluge of names as shall convince him that his
noble step in the direction of a true democracy, is appreciated;
and such too as shall be a rebuke to all half-way measures that
would leave woman (white and colored) behind the colored male;
and moreover, that shall convince Congress and the whole
government that we can be trifled with no longer on a subject so
vital to the peace, prosperity, and perpetuity of our own people,
and the establishment of free institutions among the nations of
the earth.

CONGRESS WIDE AWAKE.--Last week we gave good account of Mr.
Julian, of Indiana, on behalf of suffrage for woman. This week we
can report similar progress in the Senate also. The following is
Senator Wilson's bill to amend an act entitled an act to regulate
the elective franchise in the District of Columbia:

Be it enacted, etc., That the word "male" in the first
section of the act entitled "An act to regulate the elective
franchise in the District of Columbia, passed on the 8th day
of January, 1867," be struck out, and that every word in
said act applicable to persons of the male sex shall apply
equally to persons of the female sex, so that hereafter
women, who are inhabitants of the said District of Columbia
and citizens of the United States, may vote at all elections
and be eligible to civil offices in said District on the
same terms and conditions in all respects as men.

Mr. Julian, in the House, on leave, introduced the following bill
further to extend the right of suffrage in the District of
Columbia:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of
the United States of America in Congress Assembled, That
from and after the passage of this act the right of suffrage
in the District of Columbia shall be based upon citizenship;
and all citizens of the United States, native and
naturalized, resident in said District, who are twenty-one
years of age, of sound mind, and who have not forfeited this
right by crime, shall enjoy the same equally, irrespective
of sex.

SEC. 2, And be it further enacted, That all acts or parts of
acts inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby
repealed.

Mr. Julian, on leave, introduced the following bill further to
extend the right of suffrage in the Territories of the United
States:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of
the United States of America in Congress Assembled, That
from and after the passage of this act the right of suffrage
in all the Territories of the United States, now or
hereafter to be organized, shall be based upon citizenship;
and all citizens of the United States, native or
naturalized, resident in said Territories, who are
twenty-one years of age, of sound mind, and who have not
forfeited their right by crime, shall enjoy the same
equally, irrespective of sex.

SEC.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.