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Text on one page: Few Medium Many
With the help of good men, we shall ere long stand side
by side with ballot in hand.

PAULINA WRIGHT DAVIS: If women are the only unrecognized class as
a part of the people, then woe to the nation! for there will be
no noble mothers; frivolity, folly, and madness will seize them,
for all inverted action of the faculties becomes intense in just
the ratio of its earnestness.

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE writes: I am deeply interested in the work,
and hopeful that a broader sphere is opening for woman, that as a
class they may be trained in early life more as men are in
education and business.

Gen. OLIVER O. HOWARD answers: Please express to the Committee my
thanks for the invitation. I should be pleased to accept, but a
lecture engagement in the West will compel me to be absent from
the city.

JAMES M. SCOVILL, of New Jersey, says: I deeply desire to come.
Go on in your great work. The Convention tells on the public
mind.

GERRIT SMITH replies: I thank you for your invitation, though it
is not in my power to attend the Convention. God hasten the day
when the civil and political rights of woman shall be admitted to
be equal to those of man.

SIMEON CORLEY, M.C., of South Carolina, writes: Having been an
advocate of woman suffrage for a quarter of a century, I had the
pleasure yesterday of enrolling my name and that of my wife on
your list of delegates. To-day Hon. James H. Goss, M.C., of
South Carolina, requested me to have you insert his name. I think
you may safely count on the South Carolina delegation.

This Convention was the first public occasion when the women opposed
to the XIV Amendment, measuring their logic with Republicans,
Abolitionists, and colored men, ably maintained their position. The
division of opinion was marked and earnest, and the debate was warm
between Messrs. Douglass, Downing, Hinton, Dr. Purvis, and Edward M.
Davis on one side, and the ladies, with Robert Purvis[114] and Parker
Pillsbury on the other. Edward M. Davis, the son-in-law of Lucretia
Mott, was so hostile to the position of the women on the XIV Amendment
that he refused to enroll his name as a member of the Convention.
Nevertheless, Mrs. Mott in the chair, allowed him to criticise most
severely the resolutions and the position of those with whom she
stood. She answered his attacks with her usual gentleness, and
advocated the resolutions.[115] Robert Purvis, differing with his own
son and other colored men, denounced their position with severity. Yet
good feeling prevailed throughout, and the Convention adjourned in
order and harmony.

The following objective view of the Convention, of the tone of the
addresses, and the _personnel_ of the platform, from the pen of one of
our distinguished literary women--Sarah Clarke Lippincott--will serve
to show that the leaders in the suffrage movement were not the rude,
uncultured women generally represented by the opposition, but in point
of intelligence, refinement, appearance, and all the feminine virtues,
far above the ordinary standard. For the honor of this grand reform,
we record the compliments occasionally bestowed.

[From the _Philadelphia Press_].

WASHINGTON, Jan. 21, 1869.

The proceedings were opened with prayer by Dr. Gray, the Chaplain
of the Senate, a man of remarkably liberal spirit. This prayer,
however, did not give perfect satisfaction. Going back to the
beginning of things, the doctor unfortunately chanced to take, of
the two Mosaic accounts of the creation of man and woman, that
one which is least exalting to woman, representing her as built
on a "spare rib" of Adam. Let us hope the reverend gentleman will
"overhaul" his Genesis and "take a note."

On the platform was an imposing array of intellect, courage, and
noble character. First there was dear, revered Lucretia Mott, her
sweet, saintly face cloistered in her Quaker bonnet, her serene
and gracious presence, so dignified yet so utterly unpretending,
so self-poised yet so gentle, so peaceful yet so powerful,
sanctioning and sanctifying the meeting and the movement.

Near her sat her sister, Mrs. Wright, of Auburn, a woman of
strong, constant character and of rare intellectual culture; Mrs.
Cady Stanton, a lady of impressive and beautiful appearance, in
the rich prime of an active, generous, and healthful life; Miss
Susan B. Anthony, looking all she is, a keen, energetic,
uncompromising, unconquerable, passionately earnest woman; Clara
Barton, whose name is dear to soldiers and blessed in thousands
of homes to which the soldiers shall return no more--a brave,
benignant looking woman. But I will not indulge in personal
descriptions, though Dr. Mary Walker in her emancipated garments
and Eve-like arrangement or disarrangement of hair, is somewhat
tempting.

Senator Pomeroy, acting as temporary chairman, called the
Convention to order. Certain committees were appointed, and the
Senator spoke for some twenty or thirty minutes, very happily and
effectively, on the question of Woman's Rights under the
Constitution--both as originally written and as amended. He
argued that all born or naturalized Americans are citizens--that
neither sex nor color has anything to do with citizenship
rightfully. His reasoning seemed to us, who are interested,
cogent and logical, and his spirit fearless and broad. Mrs.
Stanton spoke on the general question with great force and
pithiness. Of all their speakers she seemed to me to have the
most weight. Her speeches are models of composition, clear,
compact, elegant, and logical. She makes her points with peculiar
sharpness and certainty, and there is no denying or dodging her
conclusions. Mrs. Mott followed Mrs. Stanton, and at a later hour
spoke again. She can not speak too often for the good of this or
any cause. Her arguments are always gently put forward, but there
is great force behind them--the force of reason and justice and
simple truth. Her wit, too, though it gleams out softly and
playfully, illuminates her subject as the keener, sharper light
of satire never could illuminate it. She is always reasonable,
gracious, and judicious. She never strives for effect, and is too
conscientious to be sensational, yet no speaker among the younger
women of this movement makes more telling points--no one knows so
well every foot of the broad field of argument. In her practiced
hand every weapon is ready on the instant, whether drawn from the
armories of Scripture, history, literature, or politics. She
reviewed the history of this movement from the beginning, paying
warm tribute to the memory of its early advocates. She proved
that for centuries the discontented, the indignant protest in the
souls of women, which has culminated in this movement, has formed
an element which has been secretly surging and seething under the
surface of society. These were no new wrongs or needs of ours,
she said; the women of the past, of all ages, had felt them; we
are only giving voice to them.

A most eloquent letter from Mrs. Ernestine L. Rose was read,
indorsing the Convention; also one from William Lloyd Garrison.
Mrs. Griffing, of Washington, spoke with remarkable earnestness
and fervor, and was followed by Mrs. Hathaway, of Boston. This
lady said: "They say the majority shall rule. Well, there are,
east of the Alleghanies, 400,000 more women than men. So the
minority rule us." Upon the whole, I was quite willing to have
this body of women orators and debaters compared with either of
the great legislative bodies who meet over in yonder great marble
temple of wisdom, eloquence, logic, and law.

Mrs. Starrett, of Kansas, a bright, ruddy, rosy woman, made a
good, practical speech on the influence of the franchise upon the
domestic life of women.

Mrs. Butler, of Vineland, N. J., made one of the most charming
and womanly speeches, or talks, of the Convention, recounting her
experience as one of the gallant band of women who, at the late
fall elections, made an imposing demonstration at the polls in
her lively and progressive town. Fearful threats had reached them
of insult and violence from rough boys and men; but they met with
absolutely nothing of the kind, though they did not approach the
polls like the Neapolitan heroine who votes for Victor Emanuel,
with pistols and daggers in their belts and war medals on their
breasts. They were made way for as respectfully as though they
had been about to enter a church door. Of course, their votes
were thrown out, but it would not always be so. They would hope
on and vote on. Touching the reforms that women intend to bring
about when they shall "come into the kingdom," she said, "we will
rule liquor out of the country;" a declaration which at the
present critical stage of affairs, and in Washington, struck me
as rather impolitic. "As to the question of woman first or the
black man first," she said, "I mean both together"; evidently
looking for a constitutional amendment gateway wide enough for
the two to dash in abreast, neck-and-neck. "Oh, woman, great is
thy faith!" This speaker related some sad stories illustrative of
woman's legal disabilities, and dwelt feelingly on the old,
palpable, intolerable grievance of inequality of wages, and on
the bars and restrictions which woman encounters at every turn,
in her struggle for an honorable livelihood.

In reply, Mrs. Mott, in her bright, sweet, deprecating way, cast
a flood of sunlight on the dark pictures, by referring to the
remodeling of the laws respecting the relation of husband and
wife, in regard to property, and the right of the mother to her
child, by the Legislatures of the various States and especially
by that of the State of New York.

Miss Anthony followed in a strain not only cheerful, but
exultant--reviewing the advance of the cause from its first
despised beginning to its present position, where, she alleged,
it commanded the attention of the world.



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