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The great
Republican party (in which are many of the ablest men of the
nation) declare that emancipation to the black man is a mockery,
without the suffrage. When the thinking minds on both continents
are agreed as to the power of the ballot in the hand of every
man, it is surprising to hear educated Americans ask, "What
possible value would suffrage be to woman?" When, in the British
Parliament, the suffrage was extended to a million new voters,
even Lord Derby and Disraeli, who were opposed to the measure,
said at once, now, if this class are to vote, we must establish
schools for their education, showing the increased importance of
every man who has a voice in the government, and the new interest
of the rulers in his education. Where all vote all must be
educated; our public school system is the result of this
principle in our government. When women vote, Harvard, Yale, and
Princeton will throw wide open their doors.

Woman is not an anomalous being outside all law, that one need
make any special arguments to prove that what elevates and
dignifies man will educate and dignify woman also. When she
exercises her right of suffrage, she will study the science of
government, gain new importance in the eyes of politicians, and
have a free pass in the world of work. If the masses knew their
power, they could turn the whole legislation of this country to
their own advantage, and drive poverty, rags, and ignorance into
the Pacific Ocean. If they would learn wisdom in the National
Labor Conventions and not sell their votes to political
tricksters, a system of Finance, Trade, and Commerce, and
Co-operation could soon be established that would secure the
rights of Labor and put an end to the concentration of wealth in
the hands of the few. Labor holds the ballot now, let it learn
how to use it. Educated women know how to use it now, let them
have it.

Immediately after the convention in Washington, Mrs. Stanton and Miss
Anthony made their first tour through the Western States, speaking at
various points in Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Ohio, having been
invited to attend several State Conventions. The editorial
correspondence in _The Revolution_, gives a brief summary of this
Western trip, so valuable in its results, in the organization of many
suffrage associations. These meetings aroused the women who had been
absorbed by the war to new and higher duties, showing them that
although the battles of freedom had been fought and settled by the
sword, many questions growing out of the conflict were still to be
adjusted by discussion and legislation, and that, all important as
their work had been in helping to save the life of the nation, there
were other duties to themselves as citizens on which the perpetuation
of our free institutions as fully depended.

To awaken women everywhere to a proper self-respect, was the special
mission of the suffrage movement, and it was a labor, for the very
elect were in favor of negro suffrage first, woman suffrage
afterwards, which meant the postponement of the latter question for
another generation. The few who had the prescience to see the long
years of apathy that always follow a great conflict, strained every
nerve to settle the broad question of suffrage on its true basis while
the people were awake to its importance, but the blindness of
reformers themselves in playing into the hands of the opposition, made
all efforts unavailing.


CHICAGO, Feb. 12, 1869.

DEAR REVOLUTION:--Sitting on the platform in the Chicago
Convention, we remember that the mail to-night must take a word
to you. After traveling forty hours on the railroad, sitting two
days in convention and talking in all the leisure hours outside,
our missives to you must be short, but not spicy, for we feel
like a squeezed sponge at the present writing. Our journey
hither, barring delays, was most charming. This was our first
trip on the Erie Railroad, and although we had heard much of the
majesty and beauty of the scenery through the valleys of the
Delaware and Susquehanna, and the spacious, comfortable cars, the
journey surpassed our expectations. The convention has been
crowded and most enthusiastic throughout; judges, lawyers,
clergymen, professors, all taking part in its deliberations. The
women of this nation may congratulate themselves that their cause
is near its triumph when such noble men as Edward Beecher, Rev.
Mr. Goodspeed, Robert Collyer, Prof. Haven, Judge Waite, and
Judge Bradwell come forward in public to advocate their cause.
Mr. Beecher made an able speech yesterday, showing that "manhood
suffrage" was not the demand of this hour, but suffrage for all
the citizens of the republic. He pointed out the necessity of
woman's voice in the legislation of the country, not only for her
own safety, but for the preservation of our free institutions.
The Secretary of the convention, Mrs. J. F. Willing of Rockford,
is a most accomplished woman. She understands Greek, Latin,
French, German, Italian, writes for several periodicals, and is
the author of "Through the Dark to the Light," a new book, it is
said, of much power and merit.

Library Hall has been literally packed throughout the convention;
and, from the letters we have already received urging us to go
hither and thither throughout the West, "The prairies seem to be
all on fire with woman's suffrage." While politicians are trying
to patch up the Republican party, now near its last gasp, the
people in the West are getting ready for the new national party,
to combine the best elements of both the old ones, soon to be
buried forever out of sight. Woman's suffrage, greenbacks, free
trade, homesteads for all, eight hours labor, and three per cent
the legal interest, will be some of the planks in the platforms
of the political parties of the future. Mrs. Livermore, the
President of the Convention, discharged the duties of her office
with great executive ability, grace, and patience. The women of
Chicago are fortunate in having in her so wise and judicious a
manager of their cause. She is a tall, dignified-looking woman,
has a fine voice and pleasant address. William Wells Brown and
Anna Dickinson enlivened the discussions of this afternoon. The
former helped to annihilate "us" of _The Revolution_ on the same
resolutions we discussed at Washington, and Anna left Mr. Robert
_Laird_ Collyer, who had already had a passage at arms with Mrs.
Livermore and Robert Collyer, without one logical weapon for his
defense. This gentleman and Rev. Mr. Hammond, brother-in-law of
Owen Lovejoy, not believing in woman's suffrage, were, unhappily
for themselves, though to the great amusement of the audience,
made the target for all the wit and satire of the platform. Mr.
Hammond, in his death gasp, declared "he believed his Bible,"
which did not help his case, for everyone else on the platform
affirmed the same faith, with only this difference, they did not
believe Mr. Hammond's interpretation of the good book. Mrs. Myra
Bradwell, editor of the Chicago _Legal News_, took a prominent
part in the convention. She is a woman of great force and
executive ability, and it is said her husband is indebted to her
for his success in life.

A telegram from Mrs. Minor, President of the Woman's Suffrage
Association in St. Louis, says that they have announced us to
speak there on Monday evening. What will interest you more than
all besides, is the unanimous passage of a resolution in the
convention indorsing _The Revolution_ as the national organ of
the woman's suffrage movement. The Chicago press has graciously
given many columns to reports of the convention.

E. C. S.

ST. LOUIS, Feb. 18.

DEAR REVOLUTION:--While in Chicago we attended a reception at
Mrs. William Doggett's, where we met Madame de Herricourt, a
distinguished French lady, who published an able work on woman
some years since, in which she severely criticised several French
writers, Michelet among the rest, for their sentimental nonsense
about the sex. She is a very brilliant woman, with a large head,
a bright, expressive face, and a stout figure, rather below the
medium height. We discussed several French writers, among others,
Victor Hugo, and fully agreed as to his women--that they were all
lamentable failures. It is strange that a writer who can paint
such strong men should so utterly fade out whenever he attempts a
woman, and, the strangest part of it is, that he does not see it
himself, and get some gifted woman to draw his female characters.
To make such grand men as Jean Valjean and Gilliette love such
types of womanhood as Victor Hugo creates, always did seem to us
a desecration of that sentiment. We called to see Sidney Howard
Gay, one of the editors of the Chicago _Tribune_, and found him
writing with his left hand, as, owing to a severe fall, his right
hand had forgotten its cunning. If the grand position the Chicago
_Tribune_ takes on Woman Suffrage, is the result of this
accident, we wish all our Republican editors in the East would
take a left handed tilt at our question. Sunday night we left
Chicago for St. Louis in the palace cars, where we slept as
comfortably as in our own home and breakfasted on the train in
the morning. The dining-room was exquisitely arranged and the
cooking excellent. The kitchen was a gem, and the cook, in the
neatness and order of his person and all his surroundings, was a
pink of male perfection.



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