A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
Louis in the palace cars, where we slept as
comfortably as in our own home and breakfasted on the train in
the morning. The dining-room was exquisitely arranged and the
cooking excellent. The kitchen was a gem, and the cook, in the
neatness and order of his person and all his surroundings, was a
pink of male perfection. It really did seem like magic, to eat,
sleep, read the morning papers, and talk with one's friends in
bed-room, dining-room and parlor, dashing over the prairies at
the rate of thirty miles an hour. While men can keep house in
this charming manner, the world will not be utterly desolate when
women _do_ vote. As we consider the great versatility in the
talents of our noble countrymen, we are lost in admiration. They
seem as much at home in watching the gyrations of an egg or
oyster in hot water as the revolutions of the heavenly bodies; in
making pins and buttons to unite garments that time and haste may
have put asunder as in spanning continents with railroads and
telegraphs.

As we reached the eastern bank of the Mississippi, we were met by
a delegation of ladies and gentlemen to escort us to St. Louis,
where we found pleasant apartments in the Southern Hotel, which
is extremely well kept, and where one is always sure of a
"christian" cup of coffee. The tea and coffee in all the hotels
on the route are the most miserable concoctions of hayseed and
chiccory that were ever palmed off on a long-suffering, patient
people. We had an enthusiastic meeting in St. Louis, and found
great interest manifested in the question of woman suffrage among
many of its leading citizens. The ladies were in high spirits, as
they had just returned from Jefferson, where they had been most
graciously received by their legislators. Miss Phoebe Couzins had
made an address at the capitol which was well received. She is a
young lady of great beauty and talent, both as a writer and
speaker, and is called the Anna Dickinson of the West. She is
studying law, and hopes to be admitted to the senior class in the
law school next year. Her mother, a woman of rare capacity, is a
candidate for the Post Office of St. Louis. We hope she will get
it. Tuesday evening we had a reception in the parlors of the
hotel. Among others, we were happy to meet Mrs. Tittman, a highly
cultivated German lady, sister of Professor Helyard, whom we met
in Washington. She announced that two of the German papers had
come out in favor of woman suffrage that morning and confessed
that they were converted the night before. We were surprised to
hear that the paper controlled by Carl Schurz and Emile Pretorius
had not taken that position long ago. But, from the character and
influence of the German ladies there, it is evident that the
German politicians must come to terms. Mrs. Minor, President of
the Missouri Woman Suffrage Association, invited us to drive
around and see the parks, gardens and new streets of the city.

We drove to the Polytechnic, and were received by Mr. Baily
(Librarian) and Mr. Devoll, ex-superintendent of schools. He said
that he was ready to vote for educated suffrage, without
distinction of sex.

The ladies then proposed to go to the Merchants' Exchange and see
the bulls and bears. Accordingly we drove there, ascended into
the galleries, and looked down upon a great crowd of men standing
round long lines of tables covered with tin pie-plates. At first
we thought they were lunching, but we soon perceived that the
tins contained different kinds of grains and flour, which wise
ones were carefully examining. As we stood there, laughing at the
idiosyncrasies of the sons of Adam, lo! two most polished
gentlemen approached our charmed circle, and announced that they
were a committee from the merchants on the floor to invite us to
come down and address them. We descended with Mr. John J. Roe and
Mr. Merritt and were introduced to the President of the Board,
George P. Plant, and Mr. Blow, who escorted us to a temporary
platform, and called the house to order. We made a short speech,
and then there were loud calls from all parts of the house for
Miss Couzins. She stepped forward and made a few pleasant
remarks, when we all bowed graciously to the gallant gentlemen
who conferred this great honor upon us, and retired.


SPRINGFIELD, Feb. 21.

DEAR REVOLUTION:--We have been resting here at the capital of
Illinois a few days. Of our meeting in the Opera House we will
say nothing about it, except that we had the Governor and members
of the Legislature as attentive listeners, and the
Lieut.-Governor for presiding officer, who made an admirable
speech indorsing woman's suffrage. Mrs. Livermore made an able
argument, though Robert _Laird_ Collyer says we never have any
logic on our platform, as if we had not been so logical in all
our positions for the last twenty years that the dear men had no
answer to make. Poor fellows! as they saw their outposts, one
after another taken, their fortresses riddled through and
through, their own guns turned on their defenseless heads, and
such fifty-pounders as "taxation without representation," "all
men created equal," "no just government can be formed without the
consent of the governed," hurled at them, no wonder they left
logic and took up ridicule; and now, when we meet them with their
own weapons, they say we can not reason. The drunken man always
imagines the lamp-posts dancing. Poor R. L. C., in the Chicago
Convention, really thought his platitudes logic, and our logic
sentiment.

On arriving at Springfield, we found the Chicago delegation all
ready to besiege the Legislature. Among them were Mrs. Mary A.
Livermore, Mr. Bradwell and his pretty wife Myra, who edits the
Chicago _Legal News_. We have met several members of the bar and
judges of the Supreme Court, among others Judge Lawrence and
Judge Breese. All these gentlemen of the bar are in favor of
amending the laws and constitutions. One thing is certain, unless
these Republicans wheel in and do their duty, the Democrats in
the West will take up woman's suffrage. We would advise the
Western men to come into the measure generously and gracefully,
and not be so obstinate and mulish as our Eastern lords have
been. There is no escape, and where is the use of courting
disgrace and defeat?

Sharon Tyndale, Ex-Secretary of State, escorted us to the House
and Senate, and introduced us to the heads of the departments. We
had two pleasant interviews with Gov. Palmer. He talks very
reasonably in regard to the enfranchisement of women, although he
says he does not quite indorse it yet, but as he has a very
clear, honest mind, he will soon convince himself that what the
ballot has done towards elevating man it will do for woman also.

The telegrams are flying in all directions for us to come here,
there, everywhere. Western women are wide-awake to-day. The
question of submitting an amendment to the Constitution to strike
out the word "male," is under consideration. The poor "white
male" is doomed.

E. C. S.


CHICAGO, March 1.

DEAR REVOLUTION:--From Springfield, I went to Bloomington,
lectured before the Young Men's Association to a large audience,
and met there many liberal men and women. I found that the Rev.
Mr. Harrison had just fired a gun in the town paper on the lack
of logic in the Chicago Convention and women's intuitions in
general. It amuses me to hear the nonsense these men talk. They
say God never intended woman to reason, they shut their college
doors against her so that she can not study that manly
accomplishment, and then they blame her for taking a short cut to
the same conclusion they reach in their roundabout, lumbering
processes of ratiocination. Do these gentlemen wish us to set
aside God's laws, pick up logic on the sidewalks, and go step by
step to a point we can reach with one flash of intuition? As long
as we have the gift of catching truth by the telegraph wires,
neither the sage of Bloomington nor Robert Laird Collyer of
Chicago need ask us to go jogging after it in a stage-coach,
perchance to be stuck in the mud on the highways as they are. It
is enough to make angels weep to see how the logicians, skilled
in the schools, are left floundering on every field before the
simple intuitions of American womanhood.

Finding the ladies of Bloomington somewhat scarified and nervous
under the Reverend's firing, like the good Samaritan, I tried to
pour oil and wine on their wounded spirits, by exalting
intuition, and with a pitiful and patronizing tone deploring the
slowness, the obtuseness, the materialism of most of the sons of
Adam. It had its effect. They soon dried their tears, and with
returning self-respect, told me of all the wonderful things women
were doing in that town. From the scintillations of wit, the fun
and the laughter, an outsider would never have supposed that we
were an oppressed class, and so hopelessly degraded in the
statute laws and Constitution. After the meeting we had a long
talk with the clerical assailant, and were happy to find that the
good man's pen had done his heart great injustice. He is rather
morbid on the question of logic; but the most melancholy symptom
of his disease is his hatred of _The Revolution_. He says it is a
very wicked paper, that he had felt it his duty to warn his
congregation against taking it, thus depriving us of, at least,
five hundred subscribers, though he read it himself (under
protest) regularly every week.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.