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Strange what a fascination evil
things have even for those who minister at the altar! He advised
me to strangle Train, gibbet the financial editor, snub the
proprietor, and to say no more in the paper on the questions of
political economy, until we had one and all studied the subject.
Dear _Revolution_, when I listened to those things, I had the
same sinking of the heart that I used to feel when neighbors
complained that my boys were running over their house-tops,
dropping stones down their chimneys, ringing their bells then
running away, throwing balls in their windows, and teazing the
girls on the sidewalk. Now, I do hope, dear _Revolution_, you
will not bring my gray hairs with sorrow to the grave, but turn
over a new leaf and adopt some Christian means to get back these
five hundred subscribers. The reverend gentleman said one thing
that was like balm to my bruised spirit. He liked everything over
the initials P. P. and E. C. S. _Sub rosa_, P. P., we must try
and circumvent Train, and fill the paper ourselves.

I met some grand women at Bloomington, one who has been a
successful merchant in the dry-goods business. She has not only
supported her self and a family of children, but cleared $5,000
in five years. Another lady is a furniture dealer; when her
husband died she went on with the business, and although he was
so much embarrassed that every one advised her to close up and
save what she could, she has paid all the debts, saved a handsome
sum of money, and been every way more successful than her husband
before her. A lady is the head of an establishment where music
and pianos are sold. She carries on a large business, and has
been very successful. All these women with their intuitions seem
to be doing much better than many who can boast the gift of
reason. I should not be surprised if, in the progress of events,
men should come to think that woman's gift, after all, is the
more desirable.

E. C. S.


TOLEDO, March 7.

DEAR REVOLUTION:--A bright, crisp morning I found myself seated
beside Mrs. Livermore in the train for Milwaukee, whither we were
going to attend a convention. In these eventful times of woman
suffrage, having been separated a few days, on meeting, our
hearts were overflowing with good news for one another. While I
told Mrs. L. all I had seen and heard at Bloomington, and the
various conversations I had had with dissenting "white males" on
the trains, she told me her plans in regard to her new paper, the
_Agitator_. Having decided to call such a journal into being,
what its name should be was the question. Accordingly a council
was held of the wise men and willful women of Chicago over the
baptismal font of the new comer. The men, still clinging to the
pleasant illusions that everything emanating from woman should be
mild, gentle, serene, suggested "The Lily," "The Rose Bud," "The
New Era," "The Dawn of Day;" but Mrs. Livermore, always heroic
and brave, now defiant and determined, having fully awakened to
the power and dignity of the ballot, and stung to the very soul
with the proposed amendment for "manhood suffrage," declared that
none of those names, however touching and beautiful, expressed
what she intended the paper should be--nothing more or less than
the twin sister of _The Revolution_, whose mission is to turn
everything inside out, upside down, wrong side before. With such
intentions, she felt the _Agitator_ was the only name that fully
matched _The Revolution_. All the women present echoed her
sentiments, eschewing the "rose bud" dispensation and declaring
that they would rather get the word "male" out of the
constitution than to have a complete set of diamonds--rather have
a right to property, wages, and children, than the best seats in
the cars, and the tid-bits at the table. Thus, with one
simultaneous shout, the women proclaimed the _Agitator_. The men
calmly and sorrowfully resigned all hope of influence in the
matter, and, as they dispersed, it was evident they looked
mournfully into the future. Good Prof. Haven said that the mere
name of the _Agitator_ gave him an ague chill, and what life
would be to most men after this twin sister to _The Revolution_
was under full headway, no one could predict. Filled with
profound pity for our beloved countrymen in this their hour of
humiliation, we arrived in Milwaukee, where a delegation of
ladies and gentlemen awaited us, among whom were a nephew and
niece of Rufus Peckham, of New York, young law students of great
promise. We drove to the Plankington House, where a suite of
beautifully furnished apartments, with a bright fire in the
grate, was prepared for us.

The Convention was held in the City Hall, and lasted two days,
three sessions each, and was crowded throughout. Miss Chapin, the
regularly ordained pastor of the Universalist church, was the
President. Mr. and Miss Peckham, Dr. Laura J. Ross, and Madam
Anneke were the ruling spirits of the Convention. Madam Anneke, a
German lady of majestic presence and liberal culture, made an
admirable speech in her own language. The platform, besides an
array of large, well-developed women, was graced with several
reverend gentlemen--Messrs. Dudley, Allison, Eddy, and
Fellows--all of whom maintained woman's equality with eloquence
and fervor. The Bible was discussed from Genesis to Revelation,
in all its bearings on the question under consideration. By
special request I gave my Bible argument, which was published in
full in the daily papers. A Rev. Mr. Love, who took the opposite
view, maintained that the Bible was opposed to woman's equality.
He criticised some of my Hebrew translations, and scientific
expositions, but as the rest of the learned D.D.s sustained my
views, I shall rest in the belief that brother Love, with time
and thought, will come to the same conclusions. A Rev. Mr.
England also profanely claimed the Bible on the side of tyranny,
and seemed to think that "Nature intended that the male should
dominate over the female everywhere." As Mr. E. is a small, thin,
shadowy man, without much blood, muscle, or a very remarkable
cerebral development, we would advise him always to avoid the
branch of the argument he stumbled upon in the Milwaukee
Convention--"the physical superiority of man." Unfortunately for
him, the platform illustrated the opposite, and the audience
manifested, ever and anon, by suppressed laughter, that they saw
the contrast between the large, well-developed brains and muscles
of the women who sat there, and those of the speaker. Either
Madam Anneke, Mrs. Livermore, or Dr. Ross, could have taken the
reverend gentleman up in her arms and run off with him. Now, I
mean nothing invidious toward small men, for some of the greatest
men the world has known have been physically inferior, for
example, Lord Nelson, Napoleon, our own Grant and Sheridan, and
ex-Secretary Seward. All I mean to say is, that it is not politic
or in good taste for a small man to come before an audience and
claim physical superiority; that branch of the argument should be
left for the great, burly fellows six feet high and
well-proportioned, who illustrate the assertion by their
overpowering presence.

We were happy to meet Mr. Butler in Milwaukee, a good Democrat,
and one of the most distinguished lawyers in Wisconsin, and to
find in him an ardent supporter of our cause. I told him we were
looking to the Democrats to open the constitutional doors to the
women in the several States. He said he thought they were getting
ready to do so in the West. In Milwaukee, my pet resolutions that
had been voted down in Washington and Chicago passed without a
dissenting voice.


MADISON, Wisconsin.

Hearing of the great enthusiasm at Milwaukee, Madison telegraphed
for the convention to adjourn to the capitol and address the
Legislature. Accordingly, on Friday a large delegation took the
train to that city. On arriving, the first person who greeted us
was Mr. Croffet, formerly of the New York _Tribune_. He went with
us to the hotel where we were introduced to lawyers, judges,
senators, generals, editors, Republicans and Democrats, who were
alike ready to break a lance for woman. A splendid audience
greeted us in the Hall of Representatives. Governor Fairchild
presided. Mrs. Livermore, Miss Anthony and myself, all said the
best things we could think of, and with as much vim as we could
command after talking all day in the cars and every moment until
we entered the capitol, without even the inspiration that comes
from a good cup of tea or coffee. Blessed are they who draw their
inspirations from the stars, the grand and beautiful in nature,
and the glory of the human face divine, for such sources
niggardly landlords and ignorant cooks can neither muddle nor
exhaust. After the meeting we were invited into the Executive
apartments and presented to Mrs. Fairchild, a woman of rare
beauty, cultivation, and common sense. She, as well as the
Governor, expressed great interest in the question of woman's
suffrage. The Governor, with many others, subscribed for _The
Revolution_.

From Madison we returned to Chicago. At Janesville, Wis., the
Postmaster, Mr. Burgess, came on board on his way to Washington.
In the course of conversation we learned that there had been some
trouble in that town about the post office, and it was finally
decided to submit the matter to a vote of the people.



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