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The Governor, with many others, subscribed for _The
Revolution_.

From Madison we returned to Chicago. At Janesville, Wis., the
Postmaster, Mr. Burgess, came on board on his way to Washington.
In the course of conversation we learned that there had been some
trouble in that town about the post office, and it was finally
decided to submit the matter to a vote of the people. The result
was that Miss Angeline King, Mr. Burgess's opponent, was chosen
by fifty majority. This was a bomb shell in the male camp, and
half a dozen men started for Washington, to show General Grant
that they had, one and all, done braver deeds during the war than
Angie possibly could have done, and that their loyalty should be
rewarded. Angie, like a wise woman, stole the march on all of
them, and reached Washington before they started. If the people
of Janesville prefer Angie, as they have shown they do by their
votes, we think it would be well for the powers that be to
confirm the choice of the people.

In Chicago, we were glad to meet again our charming friend, Anna
Dickinson. Miss Anthony spent the day with her at Mr. Doggett's
one of the liberal merchant princes of that city. The result of
that day's cogitation was one of the most cutting speeches that
the "Gentle Anna," as the _Tribune_ called her, ever made. It was
a severe, but just criticism of all the twaddle of the Western
press after the Chicago Woman's Suffrage Convention. Liberty Hall
was crowded with a most enthusiastic audience, and although the
press was not very complimentary the next day, the people who
listened were delighted. She was advertised to give "Fair Play,"
but the West is tired of the negro question, and she was besieged
on all sides to speak on woman, which she did with great effect.

E. C. S.


GALENA, March 3.

DEAR REVOLUTION:--As you look at the date, your patriotic heart
will palpitate to think that the women of _The Revolution_ have
taken possession of the home of the President, and propose to
hold a Woman Suffrage Convention right under the very shadow of
his flagstaff, peering up beside one chimney of a large square
brick house with a flat roof. Said house is situated on a high
hill with pleasant grounds about. At the present writing we are
on the opposite hill under the hospitable roof of "Sarah Coates,"
whose name appears in the reports of all the early Ohio
conventions. She is now Mrs. Harris. We arrived here this morning
at six o'clock, and found good Mr. Harris waiting for us at the
depot. He is one of the oldest and wealthiest inhabitants in the
county. They have a beautiful home, surrounded with every comfort
and luxury. Mrs. Harris is a noble woman, tall, fine-looking, and
moves about among her household gods like a queen. Although she
has a large family of black-eyed, rosy-cheeked children,
pictures, statuary, a cabinet of rare minerals, a conservatory of
beautiful plants, and a husband who thinks her but little lower
than the angels, she still demands the right to vote, and
occasionally indulges in the luxury of public speaking. She is
the moving spirit in every step of progress in Galena, and was
the President of the convention. We have had a most enthusiastic
meeting, three sessions, and house crowded throughout on an
admission fee of twenty-five cents. The women all over the West
are wide-awake. Theodore Tilton had just preceded us, and some
ladies laughingly told us that Theodore said they would
_certainly_ vote in _twenty years_!!

Let our cold-blooded Eastern reformers understand that ideas,
like grains, grow fast in the West, and that women here intend to
vote now, "right along," as the Hutchinsons sing. The editor of
the _Independent_ may talk of twenty years down on the Hudson
among the Rip Van Winkles in Spookey Hollow, to H. G. in New
York, or W. P. at the "Hub," but never to Western audiences, or
to the women of _The Revolution_. Why, Mr. Tilton, when you go to
the Senate some wise woman will sit on your right, and some black
man on your left. You are to pay the penalty of your theorizing
and be sandwiched between a woman and a black man in all the laws
and constitutions before five years pass over your curly head.
Twenty years! Why, Theodore, we expect to be walking the golden
streets of the New Jerusalem by that time, talking with Noah,
Moses, and Aaron, about the flood, the Pharaohs, the journey
through the Red Sea and the wilderness. We shall be holding
conventions by that time on the banks of the Jordan with Eve,
Sarah, Rebecca, Huldah, Deborah, Miriam, Ruth, Naomi, Sheba,
Esther, Vashti, Mary, Elizabeth, Priscilla and Phebe, Tryphena
and Tryphosa, and all the strong-minded women honorably mentioned
in sacred history. Do you not know, Theodore, that we have vowed
never to go disfranchised into the Kingdom of Heaven? In the
meantime, we propose to discuss sanitary and sumptuary laws,
finance, and free trade, religion and railroads, education and
elections with such worthies as yourself in the councils of the
American republic. Twenty years! Why, every white male in the
nation will be tied to an apron-string by that time, while all
the poets and philosophers will be writing essays on "The Sphere
of Man"!

We found the good men and women of Galena filled with faith in
the new President. They say he is a sober, honest, true man; that
he will entirely revolutionize affairs at Washington, send the
old political hacks to their homes, drive bribery and corruption
from high places, and draw a new order of statesmen about him.
May the good angels guide and strengthen him, for unless
something is soon done to rouse the slumbering virtue of the
American people, our sun will set in darkness to rise no more.
Feeling the deepest interest in the past, the present, and the
future of Ulysses, we asked a thousand questions concerning him.
Among other things, we proposed to go to the tannery where he
used to work, but found that was a myth. We peeped into some of
the stores where, in his leisure hours, he used to smoke the pipe
of peace, and fancied that in walking up and down the streets our
feet might be treading in his footsteps. What a fascination there
is in the material surroundings of great souls, and in contact
with the people who have seen and loved them! But, alas, how
little of the inner life, that is most interesting to hear about,
mortals ever reveal to one another.

On the way from Galena to Toledo we met Frederick Douglass,
dressed in a cap and a great circular cape of wolf-skins. He
really presented a most formidable and ferocious aspect. I
thought perhaps he intended to illustrate "William the Silent" in
his northern dress, as well as to depict his character in his
Lyceum lecture. As I had been talking against the pending
amendment of "manhood suffrage," I trembled in my shoes and was
almost as paralyzed as Red Riding Hood in a similar encounter.
But unlike the little maiden, I had a friend at hand, and, as
usual in the hour of danger, I fell back in the shadow of Miss
Anthony, who stepped forward bravely and took the wolf by the
hand. His hearty words of welcome and gracious smile reassured
me, so that when my time came I was able to meet him with the
usual _suaviter in modo_. Our joy in shaking hands here and there
with Douglass, Tilton, and Anna Dickinson, through the West, was
like meeting ships at sea; as pleasant and as fleeting.
Douglass's hair is fast becoming as white as snow, which adds
greatly to the dignity of his countenance. We hear his lecture on
"William the Silent" much praised. Mr. Tilton's lecture too, on
"Statesmanship," is said to be the best he has ever delivered. We
had an earnest debate with Douglass as far as we journeyed
together, and were glad to find that he was gradually working up
to our ideas on the question of suffrage. He is at present
hanging by the eyelids half-way between the lofty position of
Robert Purvis, and the narrow one of George W. Downing. As he
will attend the woman suffrage anniversary in New York in May, we
shall have an opportunity for a full and free discussion of the
whole question.


TOLEDO, Ohio.

At two o'clock in the morning we reached Toledo, drove to the
Oliver House, registered our names, left some notes for friends,
who would be looking for us next day, and then retired, giving
orders not to be called till noon, even for the King of France.
At the appointed hour our friend, Mr. Israel Hall, formerly of
Syracuse, was announced. He invited us to his hospitable home,
where we stayed during the convention, which was held in Hunker's
Hall and pronounced a complete success. At the close of the
meetings, a rising vote was called of all those in favor of
woman's suffrage. The entire audience, men and women, rose as if
one body. Two dissenting "white males" (small, men of course)
came to the surface in opposition, to the great amusement of
everybody. The platform throughout the meetings was occupied by
some of the leading men and women of the city. Judge Jones called
the convention to order and presided over its deliberations.
There was no lack of questions in Toledo, but they were all
cunningly propounded in writing. This was a new feature in our
meetings and we were much struck with its wisdom.



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