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[Great applause.] The lady then
referred to the great work that lay before them in lifting out of
misery and wretchedness the numbers of women in this city and
elsewhere, who were experiencing all the fullness of human
degradation. Even when they had finished their present work, a
large field was still before them in the elevation of their sex.
[Applause.]

Mrs. PAULINA W. DAVIS said she would not be altogether satisfied
to have the XVth Amendment passed without the XVIth, for woman
would have a race of tyrants raised above her in the South, and
the black women of that country would also receive worse
treatment than if the Amendment was not passed. Take any class
that have been slaves, and you will find that they are the worst
when free, and become the hardest masters. The colored women of
the South say they do not want to get married to the negro, as
their husbands can take their children away from them, and also
appropriate their earnings. The black women are more intelligent
than the men, because they have learned something from their
mistresses. She then related incidents showing how black men whip
and abuse their wives in the South. One of her sister's servants
whipped his wife every Sunday regularly. [Laughter.] She thought
that sort of men should not have the making of the laws for the
government of the women throughout the land. [Applause.]

Mr. DOUGLASS said that all disinterested spectators would concede
that this Equal Rights meeting had been pre-eminently a Woman's
Rights meeting. [Applause.] They had just heard an argument with
which he could not agree--that the suffrage to the black men
should be postponed to that of the women. I do not believe the
story that the slaves who are enfranchised become the worst of
tyrants. [A voice, "Neither do I." Applause.] I know how this
theory came about. When a slave was made a driver, he made
himself more officious than the white driver, so that his master
might not suspect that he was favoring those under him. But we do
not intend to have any master over us. [Applause.]

THE PRESIDENT, Mrs. Stanton, argued that not another man should
be enfranchised until enough women are admitted to the polls to
outweigh those already there. [Applause.] She did not believe in
allowing ignorant negroes and foreigners to make laws for her to
obey. [Applause.]

Mrs. HARPER (colored) asked Mr. Blackwell to read the fifth
resolution of the series he submitted, and contended that that
covered the whole ground of the resolutions of Mr. Douglass. When
it was a question of race, she let the lesser question of sex go.
But the white women all go for sex, letting race occupy a minor
position. She liked the idea of working women, but she would
like to know if it was broad enough to take colored women?

Miss ANTHONY and several others: Yes, yes.

Mrs. HARPER said that when she was at Boston there were sixty
women who left work because one colored woman went to gain a
livelihood in their midst. [Applause] If the nation could only
handle one question, she would not have the black women put a
single straw in the way, if only the men of the race could obtain
what they wanted. [Great applause.]

Mr. C. C. BURLEIGH attempted to speak, but was received with some
disapprobation by the audience, and confusion ensued.

Miss ANTHONY protested against the XVth Amendment because it
wasn't Equal Rights. It put two million more men in position of
tyrants over two million women who had until now been the equals
of the men at their side.

Mr. BURLEIGH again essayed to speak. The confusion was so great
that he could not be heard.

Mrs. STONE appealed for order, and her first appearance caused
the most respectful silence, as did the words of every one of the
ladies who addressed the audience. Mr. Burleigh again ventured,
but with no better result, and Miss Anthony made another appeal
to the audience to hear him. He tried again to get a word in, but
was once more unsuccessful.

Mrs. LIVERMORE, after protesting against the disorderly behavior
of the audience, said a few words in advocacy of the resolutions
of Mr. Douglass, when a motion was made to lay them upon the
table, and Mr. Blackwell moved the "previous question."

Miss ANTHONY hoped that this, the first attempt at gagging
discussion, would not be countenanced. (Applause.) She made a
strong protest against this treatment of Mr. Burleigh. Sufficient
silence was obtained for that gentleman to say that he had
finished; but he was determined that they should hear the last
word. (Hisses and laughter.) He now took his seat. The motion to
lay the resolutions upon the table for discussion in the evening
was then carried, and the Association adjourned till the evening,
to meet in the large hall of the Cooper Institute. A letter from
Jules Favre, the celebrated French advocate and _litterateur_,
was read, after which addresses were delivered by Madam Anneke,
of Milwaukee (in German), and by Madame de Hericourt, of Chicago
(in French). Both of these ladies are of revolutionary
tendencies, and left their native countries because they had
rendered themselves obnoxious by a too free expression of their
political opinions.

Madam ANNEKE said--_Mrs. President_: Nearly two decades have
passed since, in answer to a call from our co-workers, I stood
before a large assembly, over which Mrs. Mott presided, to utter,
in the name of suffering and struggling womanhood, the cry of my
old Fatherland for freedom and justice. At that time my voice was
overwhelmed by the sound of sneers, scoffs, and hisses--the
eloquence of tyranny, by which every outcry of the human heart is
stifled. Then, through the support of our friends Mrs. Rose and
Wendell Phillips, who are ever ready in the cause of human
rights, I was allowed, in my native tongue, to echo faintly the
cry for justice and freedom. What a change has been wrought since
then! To-day they greet us with deferential respect. Such giant
steps are made by public opinion! What they then derided, and
sought, through physical power and rough ignorance, to render
wholly impossible, to day they greet with the voice of welcome
and jubilee. Such an expression of sentiment is to us the most
certain and joyful token of a gigantic revolution in public
opinion--still more gratifying is it, that the history of the
last few years proves that under the force of an universal
necessity, reason and freedom are being consistently developed.
Such is the iron step of time, that it brings forward every event
to meet its rare fulfillment. Under your protection I am once
more permitted, in this dawning of a new epoch which is visible
to all eyes that will see, and audible to all ears that will
hear, to express my hopes, my longing, my striving, and my
confidence. And now, permit me to do so in the language of my
childhood's play, as well as that of the earnest and free
philosophy of German thinkers and workers. Not that I believe it
is left to me to interest the children of my old Fatherland, here
present, in the new era of truth and freedom, as if these
glorious principles were not of yore implanted in their
hearts--as if they could not take them up in a strange idiom--but
because I am urged from my deepest soul to speak out loud and
free, as I have ever felt myself constrained to do, and as I can
not do in the language of my beloved adopted land. The
consciousness and the holy conviction of our inalienable human
rights, which I have won in the struggle of my own strangely
varied life, and in the wrestling for independence which has
carried me through the terrors of bloody revolution, and brought
me to this effulgent shore where _Sanita Libertas_ is free to all
who seek it--this sacred strand, of which our German poet says:
_Dich halte ich!_ (I have gained thee and will not leave thee.)
So I turn to you, my dear compatriots, in the language of our
Fatherland--to you who are accustomed to German ways of
thinking--to you who have grown up in the light which flows from
thinking brains--to you whose hearts warmly cherish human rights
and human worth--who are not afraid of truth when it speaks of
such deep, clear, and universally important subjects as human
rights and human duties. He who fears truth will find hiding
places, but he who combats for it is worthy of it. The method of
its adversaries is to address themselves to thoughtless passion,
and thus arouse mockery and abuse against those who search for
scientific knowledge to appeal to easily moved feelings and
kindle sentiments of hatred and contempt. They can do this only
while truth is in the minority--only until right shall become
might.

You will learn to judge of woman's strength when you see that she
persists strenuously in this purpose, and secures, by her energy,
the rights which shall invest her with power. That which you can
no longer suppress in woman--that which is free above all
things--that which is pre-eminently important to mankind, and
must have free play in every mind, is the natural thirst for
scientific knowledge--that fountain of all peacefully progressing
amelioration in human history. This longing, this effort of
reason seeking knowledge of itself, of ideas, conclusions, and
all higher things, has, as far as historical remembrance goes
back, never been so violently suppressed in any human being as
in woman.



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