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They will bring
all these in before us, and then they will bring in the
babies--the _male_ babies. [Laughter.] I am a foreigner. I had
great difficulty in acquiring the English language, and I never
shall acquire it. But I am afraid that in the meaning of language
Congress is a great deal worse off than I have ever been. I go
for the change of name; I will not be construed into a man and a
brother. I ask the same rights for women that are extended to
men--the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness;
and every pursuit in life must be as free and open to me as any
man in the land. [Applause.] But they will never be thrown open
to me or to any of you, until we have the power of the ballot in
our own hands. That little paper is a great talisman. We have
often been told that the golden key can unlock all the doors.
That little piece of paper can unlock doors where golden keys
fail. Wherever men are--whether in the workshop, in the store, in
the laboratory, or in the legislative halls--I want to see women.
Wherever man is, there she is needed; wherever man has work to
do--work for the benefit of humanity--there should men and women
unite and co-operate together. It is not well for man to be alone
or work alone; and he can not work for woman as well as woman can
work for herself. I suggest that the name of this society be
changed from Equal Rights Association to Woman's Suffrage
Association.

LUCY STONE said she must oppose this till the colored man gained
the right to vote. If they changed the name of the association
for such a reason as it was evident it was proposed, they would
lose the confidence of the public. I hope you will not do it.

A GENTLEMAN: Mrs. President, I hope you will do it. I move that
the name of the association be changed to the "Universal
Franchise Association."

Mrs. STANTON: The question is already settled by our
constitution, which requires a month's notice previous to the
annual meeting before any change of name can be made. We will now
have a song. [Laughter.]

Mr. BLACKWELL said that he had just returned from the South, and
that he had learned to think that the test oath required of white
men who had been rebels must be abolished before the vote be
given to the negro. He was willing that the negro should have the
suffrage, but not under such conditions that he should rule the
South. [At the allusion of Mr. Blackwell to abolishing the test
oath, the audience hissed loudly.]

Mrs. STANTON said--Gentlemen and Ladies: I take this as quite an
insult to me. It is as if you were invited to dine with me and
you turned up your nose at everything that was set on the table.

Mrs. LIVERMORE said: It certainly requires a great amount of
nerve to talk before you, for you have such a frankness in
expressing yourselves that I am afraid of you. [Laughter and
applause.] If you do not like the dish, you turn up your nose at
it and say, "Take it away, take it away." [Laughter.] I was
brought up in the West, and it is a good place to get rid of any
superfluous modesty, but I am afraid of you. [Applause.] It seems
that you are more willing to be pleased than to hear what we have
to say. [Applause.] Throughout the day the men who have attended
our Convention have been turbulent. [Applause.] I say it frankly,
that the behavior of the majority of men has not been respectful.
[Applause.] She then gave a pathetic narration of the sorrow she
had seen among the depraved and destitute of our great cities,
and said the work of the coming year would be to get up a monster
petition of a million of names asking the Legislature for
suffrage. [Applause.]

After a song from the Hutchinson Family, who had come from
Chicago to entertain the audiences of the Association, the
meeting adjourned.

The friends of woman's suffrage, including most of the delegates to
the Equal Rights Convention in New York, met in mass meeting in the
Academy of Music, Brooklyn, Friday morning, May 14th, at 10 o'clock.
Mr. Edwin A. Studwell called the meeting to order and nominated Mrs.
Anna C. Field for President. This lady was unanimously elected, and
took the chair. Mrs. Celia Burleigh was elected Secretary. On motion
of Mr. Studwell, a committee[122] was appointed to draft resolutions.
Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was then introduced, and made the opening
speech.

Mrs. LUCY STONE congratulated the ladies upon the large number of
men who had become converted to their cause.

Mr. LANGDON, of Vermont, followed with a brief speech.

Mrs. BURLEIGH read a letter from the Hon. Geo. Wm. Curtis,
indorsing very decidedly the doctrine of woman suffrage.

Rev. PHEBE HANAFORD then delivered a most eloquent and touching
address on the moral influence that the participation of women in
government would have upon the world. Every true mother was with
this movement. The golden rule given by Jesus, if carried out,
would give equal rights to all, and there would be no distinction
between color, race, or sex.

The Rev. GILBERT HAVEN, of Massachusetts, said there were three
reforms needed--one was the abolition of social distinctions,
another was the abolition of the rum-shop, and the third was
giving the ballot to women. Of the three, which should take the
precedence? It was hard to say that woman did not lead them all.
He had claimed yesterday that the Woman's Rights movement
originated in Massachusetts. He was mistaken. The great idea of
woman's equality was taught by Christ; and still further back,
when man and woman were created and placed in Paradise, they were
placed there on an equality. God gave man no supremacy over woman
there. Not until sin had entered the world, not until after the
fall was it said, "He shall rule over her." If we were to be
controlled by this curse of sin, we should still adhere to the
old law giving the supremacy to the first-born son, for that was
declared at the same time between Cain and Abel. Sin degraded,
but grace emancipated. On the day of Pentecost, the Spirit fell
upon the man and woman alike. St. Paul declared this great
doctrine of Woman's Rights when he said, "There is neither Greek
nor Jew, neither bond nor free, neither male nor female, but all
are one in Christ. If a woman prophesy, let her prophesy with the
head covered," but he did not say women shall not prophesy. The
doctrine of Woman's Rights originated with God Himself. There
were many reasons why we should give the ballot to women. It
would elevate woman herself, as well as confer incalculable
benefits on man.

At the afternoon session addresses were made by Mrs. Livermore, Lucy
Stone, Lilie Peckham, Rev. J. W. Chadwick, and Lucretia Mott. In the
evening the building was crowded throughout, including stage and both
galleries, with the very best of people. The Committee on organization
reported for President, Mrs. Celia Burleigh, and for Vice-Presidents
about twenty names. Mrs. Norton read an extract from a letter of Wm.
Lloyd Garrison. Miss Olive Logan spoke in her own dramatic style. She
dealt numerous severe blows at the other sex. Her many sarcastic and
humorous hits elicited great applause. A resolution declaring woman
entitled to vote and hold office under all conditions which it is
proper to impose on man, was read and adopted, after which Lucretia
Mott addressed the convention in her usual happy manner.

Mrs. HARPER spoke on matters concerning her own race.

The Rev. HENRY WARD BEECHER said: In relation to this Woman's
Rights movement, I am opposed to coercion. If a woman says, "I
have all the rights I want," I say, very well. We do not preach
the doctrine of coercive rights. You shall have perfect liberty
to stay at home. All we ask is, that women shall follow their
natures. Of all heresies it seems to me there never was one so
absurd as that which supposes that woman is not fit for the
peculiar duties of government. She was fit to whip you and me; to
teach us the best things we know; fit to take care of home; and
let me tell you that the woman who is fit to take care of home is
fit to stand in the gateway of heaven itself. Nothing is more
sacred between this and the heavenly rest than the Christian
household. It is said that woman is not fit to hold office. Take
the Presidents of the United States, as they run for the last
eight or ten years, and I would rather take my chances among the
average of women. A President of these United States requires
merely common sense and honesty. Men are not more honest than
women, not more sincere nor more capable.

Miss PHOEBE COUZINS and Mr. DOUGLASS made brief addresses. The
HUTCHINSONS sang one of their soul-stirring songs. LUCY STONE closed
the exercises with a most effective appeal.

Out of these broad differences of opinion on the amendments, as shown
in the debates, divisions grew up between Republicans and
Abolitionists on the one side, and the leaders of the Woman Suffrage
movement on the other. The constant conflict on the Equal Rights
platform proved the futility of any attempt to discuss the wrongs of
different classes in one association. A general dissatisfaction had
been expressed by the delegates from the West at the latitude of
debate involved in an Equal Rights Association. Hence, a change of
name and more restricted discussions were strenuously urged by them.
Accordingly, at the close of Anniversary week, a meeting was called at
the Woman's Bureau,[123] which resulted in reorganization under the
name of "The National Woman Suffrage Association."[124]

There had been so much trouble with men in the Equal Rights Society,
that it was thought best to keep the absolute control henceforth in
the hands of women.



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