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Sad experience had taught them that in trying
emergencies they would be left to fight their own battles, and
therefore it was best to fit themselves for their responsibilities by
filling the positions of trust exclusively with women. This was not
accomplished without a pretty sharp struggle. As it was, they had to
concede the right of membership to men, in order to carry the main
point, as several ladies would not join unless men also could be
admitted. All preliminaries discussed and amicably adjusted, a list of
officers was chosen and an organization completed, making a XVIth
Amendment the special object of its work and consideration. The
regular weekly meetings of this Association were reported by the
metropolitan press with many spicy and critical comments, which did a
great educational work and roused much thought on the whole question.

Conventions were held during the summer at Saratoga and Newport. The
following letter from Celia Burleigh gives a bird's-eye view of that
at Saratoga:


SARATOGA, July 16th, 1869.

The advocates of Woman Suffrage have fairly earned the title of
Revolutionists by their recent bold move on the enemy's
stronghold. The great foe to progress is want of thought, and the
devotees of fashion are about the last to come into line and work
for any great reform. Not a little surprise, and some
indignation, were expressed by the representatives of upper
tendom sojourning here, that strong-minded women were not only
coming to Saratoga, but actually intending to hold a convention.
What next? What place would henceforth be safe from the assaults
of these irrepressible amazons of reform? Saratoga has survived
the shock, however; Flora McFlimsey has looked in the face of
Miss Anthony, and has not been turned to stone. More than that,
finding the convention pouring into the parlors of Congress Hall,
and escape actually cut off, Flora, after deliberating whether to
faint and be carried out, or gratify her curiosity by looking on,
finally submitted gracefully to the inevitable and did the
latter. From her crimson cushioned arm chair by the window, she
saw the meeting called to order, saw one after another of "those
horrid women, whose names are in the newspapers," quietly taking
their places, doing the thing proper to be done, and carrying
forward the business of the meeting. Really, they were not so
dreadful after all. They neither wore beards nor pantaloons.
There was not even a woman with short hair among them. On the
contrary, they seemed to be decidedly appreciative of "good
clothes" and if less familiar with the goddess of fashion than
Miss Flora they did not walk arm in arm with her, they at least
followed at no great distance and were, to a woman, finished off
with the regulation back-bow of loops and ends. Spite of herself,
Miss McFlimsey became interested, and when Miss Anthony mentioned
the fact that the majority of men felt it necessary to talk down
to women, instead of sharing with them their best thoughts and
most vital interests, Flora looked reflective, as if in that
direction might lie the clew to the insufferable stupidity which
she often found in the young gentlemen of her acquaintance.

That a Woman Suffrage Convention should have been allowed to
organize in the parlors of Congress Hall, that those parlors
should have been filled to their utmost capacity by the habitual
guests of the place, that such men as Millard Fillmore, Thurlow
Weed, George Opdyke, and any number of clergymen from different
parts of the country, should have been interested lookers-on, are
significant facts that may well carry dismay to the enemies of
the cause. That the whole business of the Convention was
transacted by women in a dignified, orderly, and business-like
manner, is a strong intimation that in spite of all that has been
said to the contrary, women are capable of learning how to
conduct meetings and manage affairs. Even the least friendly
spectator was compelled to admit it, that the delegates to the
Convention were as free from eccentricity in dress and manner as
the most fastidious taste could demand; that they were remarkable
only for the comprehensive range of thought, indicated in their
utterances, and the earnestness with which they advocate
principles which they evidently believe to be right. Another fact
worth noticing is the character of the reports of the Convention
furnished to the daily papers. They were, for the most part,
full, impartial, and respectful in tone; especially was this the
case with the local papers. Altogether, the Woman Suffrage
Conventions in the State of New York must be regarded as a
decided success. The interest manifested shows that thought on
the subject is no longer confined to the few, but that it is
gradually permeating the whole public mind.

In its present condition, Saratoga realizes one's ideal of a
summer resort, and yet in the good time coming, we can imagine an
improvement--that even Congress Hall, with its gentlemanly and
courteous proprietor, its sumptuous appointments and army of
waiters, may yet have an added excellence; when, by the
possession of the ballot, woman becomes a possible proprietor and
actual worker; when to earn money is as honorable for a woman as
it now is for a man, we may hope to find in every hotel not only
a host, but a hostess; and whatever may be said of the excellence
of men as housekeepers, I confidently predict that even Congress
Hall will be vastly improved by the addition.

The chief speakers at this Convention were Charlotte Wilbour,
Celia Burleigh, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Rev. Mr. Angier, J. N.
Holmes, Esq., Judge McKean, and Mrs. Dr. Strowbridge.

C. B.


THE NEWPORT CONVENTION.--_Dear Revolution_: Susan B. Anthony
having decided that neither age, color, sex, or previous
condition could shield any one from this agitation--that neither
the frosts of winter nor the heats of summer could afford its
champions any excuse for halting on the way, our forces were
commanded to be in marching order on the 25th of August, to
besiege the "butterflies of fashion" in Newport.[125] Having
gleefully chased butterflies in our young days on our way to
school, we thought it might be as well to chase them in our old
age on the way to heaven. So, obeying orders, we sailed across
the Sound one bright moonlight night with a gay party of the
"disfranchised," and found ourselves quartered on the enemy the
next morning as the sun rose in all its resplendent glory.
Although trunk after trunk--not of gossamers, laces, and
flowers, but of Suffrage ammunition, speeches, resolutions,
petitions, tracts, John Stuart Mill's last work, and folios of
_The Revolution_ had been slowly carried up the winding stairs of
the Atlantic--the brave men and fair women, who had tripped the
light fantastic toe until the midnight hours, slept heedlessly
on, wholly unaware that twelve apartments were already filled
with invaders of the strong-minded editors, reporters, and the
Hutchinson family to the third and fourth generation.

Suffice it to say the Convention continued through two days with
the usual amount of good and bad speaking and debating, strong
and feeble resolutions, fair and unfair reporting--but, with all
its faults, an improvement on the general run of conventions
called by the stronger sex. We say this not in a spirit of
boasting, but with a heart overflowing with pity for the "men of
the period." The chief speakers were Paulina Wright Davis,
Isabella Beecher Hooker, Theodore Tilton, Francis D. Moulton,
Rev. Phebe Hanaford, Lillie Devereux Blake, Elizabeth R.
Churchill, the Hon. Mr. Stillman, of Rhode Island; and the editor
and proprietor of _The Revolution_. The occasion was enlivened
with the stirring songs of the Hutchinsons, and a reading by Mrs.
Sarah Fisher Ames, the distinguished artist who moulded the bust
of Abraham Lincoln which now adorns the rooms of the Union
League.

The audience throughout the sittings of the Convention was large,
fashionable, and as enthusiastic as the state of the weather
would permit. From the numbers of _The Revolution_ and John
Stuart Mill's new work sold at the door, it is evident that much
interest was roused on the question. We can say truly that we
never received a more quiet and respectful hearing; and, from
many private conversations with ladies and gentlemen of
influence, we feel assured that we have done much by our
gatherings in Saratoga and Newport to awaken thought among a new
class of people. The _ennui_ and utter vacuity of a life of mere
pleasure is fast urging fashionable women to something better,
and, when they do awake to the magnitude and far-reaching
consequences of woman's enfranchisement, they will be the most
enthusiastic workers for its accomplishment.

E. C. S.

The Fourth of July this year was celebrated for the first time by
members of the Woman Suffrage Association, in a beautiful grove in
Westchester County. Edwin A. Studwell of Brooklyn made all the
necessary arrangements. Speeches were made by Judge E. D. Culver, Mrs.
Stanton, and Miss Anthony. The Woman Suffrage meetings at the Bureau
were crowded every week. October 7th there was an unusually large
attendance, to discuss the coming Industrial Congress at Berlin. The
following letter to the Berlin Congress was read and adopted:


NATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION, }
NEW YORK, September 28, 1869.



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