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October 7th there was an unusually large
attendance, to discuss the coming Industrial Congress at Berlin. The
following letter to the Berlin Congress was read and adopted:


NATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION, }
NEW YORK, September 28, 1869. }

_To the Woman's Industrial Congress at Berlin_:

At a meeting of our Executive Committee the call for your
Convention was duly considered, and a committee appointed to
address you a letter. In behalf of the progressive women of this
country we would express to you the deep interest we feel in the
present movement among the women of Europe, everywhere throwing
off the lethargy of ages and asserting their individual dignity
and power, showing that the emancipation of woman is one of those
great ideas that mark the centuries. While in your circular you
specify various subjects for consideration, you make no mention
of the right of suffrage.

As yours is an Industrial Congress in which women occupied in
every branch of labor are to be represented, you may think this
question could not legitimately come before you. And even if it
could, you may not think best to startle the timid or provoke the
powerful by the assertion that a fair day's wages for a fair
day's work and the dignity of labor, alike depend on the
political status of the laborer. Perhaps in your country, where
the right of representation is so limited even among men, women
do not feel the degradation of disfranchisement as we do under
this Government, where it is now proposed to make sex the only
disqualification for citizenship.

The ultimate object of all these labor movements on both
continents, is the emancipation of the masses from the slavery of
poverty and ignorance, and the shorter way to this end is to give
all the people a voice in the laws that govern them, for the
ballot is bread, land, education, dignity, and power. The
extending of new privileges and abating of old grievances may
afford some temporary relief; but the kernel of the whole
question of the people's wrongs can never be touched until the
essential equality of all citizens under the government is fully
recognized. In America we have the true theory of government, and
step by step we are coming to its practical realization.

Seeing that no class ever did or ever can legislate wisely for
another, the women, even in this country, have done complaining
of specific wrongs, and are demanding the right to legislate for
themselves. We are now holding conventions in the chief cities of
the several States, and petitioning Congress for a sixteenth
amendment to the Federal Constitution that shall forbid the
disfranchisement of any citizen on account of sex. In January,
soon after the convening of Congress, we shall hold a National
Convention in Washington to press our arguments on the
representatives of the people. Sooner or later you will be driven
to make the same demand; for, from whatever point you start in
tracing the wrongs of citizens, you will be logically brought
step by step to see that the real difficulty in all cases is the
need of representation in the government. However various our
plans and objects, we are all working to a common centre. And in
this general awakening among women we are taking the grandest
step in civilization that the world has yet seen. When men and
women are reunited as equals in the great work of life, then, and
not till then, will harmony and happiness reign supreme on earth.
Tendering you our best wishes for the success of your convention
and the triumph of our cause in Europe, we are yours, with much
esteem,

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON, ELIZABETH B. PHELPS,
CHARLOTTE B. WILBOUR, SUSAN B. ANTHONY.
PAULINA WRIGHT DAVIS.

The following ladies were appointed delegates to the Woman's
Industrial Congress called to meet at Berlin: Ernestine L. Rose, Laura
C. Bullard, New York; Kate N. Doggett, Mary J. Safford, Illinois; Mary
Peckenpaugh, Missouri. A letter from Mrs. Bullard[126] was listened to
with interest.

During the Autumn of this year there was a secession from our ranks,
and the preliminary steps were taken for another organization. Aside
from the divisions growing out of a difference of opinion on the
amendments, there were some personal hostilities among the leaders of
the movement that culminated in two Societies, which were generally
spoken of as the New York and Boston wings of the Woman Suffrage
reform. The former, as already stated, called the "National Woman
Suffrage Association," with Elizabeth Cady Stanton for President,
organized in May; the latter called "The American Woman Suffrage
Association," with Henry Ward Beecher for President, organized the
following November. Most of those who inaugurated the reform remained
in the National Association--Lucretia Mott, Martha C. Wright,
Ernestine Rose, Clarina Howard Nichols, Paulina Wright Davis, Sarah
Pugh, Amy Post, Mary H. Hallowell, Lydia Mott, Catharine A. F.
Stebbins, Adeline Thomson, Josephine S. Griffing, Clemence S. Lozier,
Rev. Olympia Brown, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan
B. Anthony--and continued to work harmoniously together.


FOOTNOTES:

[111] A NATIONAL WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE CONVENTION will be held in Carroll
Hall, Washington, D. C., on the 19th and 20th of January, 1869. All
associations friendly to Woman's Rights are invited to send delegates
from every State. Friends of the cause are invited to attend and take
part in the discussions.

_Committee of Arrangements._--Josephine S. Griffing, William
Hutchinson, Lydia S. Hall, John H. Crane, Mary T. Corner, George F.
Needham, James K. Wilcox.

[112] Speeches were made by Mrs. Griffing and Miss Clara Barton of
Washington, Mrs. Wright and Susan B. Anthony of New York, Mr. Edward
M. Davis and Mr. Robert Purvis of Pennsylvania, Dr. Charles Purvis,
Mr. and Mrs. Stebbins, Mr. Wilcox, Mrs. Julia Archibald, Col. Hinton
and Mr. George T. Downing of Washington, Mrs. Starrett, Dr. Root and
Mrs. Archibald of Kansas, Mr. Wolff of Colorado, Mrs. Kingsbury of
Vineland, New Jersey, Mrs. Dr. Hathaway of Massachusetts, Mrs. Minor
of Missouri, and others.

[113] The amendment as proposed by the Hon. Thaddeus Stevens, of
Pennsylvania, extended the right of suffrage to "all citizens," which
included both white and black women. At the bare thought of such an
impending calamity, the more timid Republicans were filled with alarm,
and the word "male" promptly inserted.

[114] A circumstance at the Woman's National Convention served to
impress me profoundly with the monstrousness of slavery, and of the
prejudice it created and has left behind it, which I have been waiting
a convenient opportunity to tell you about. Far into the first evening
of the Convention, when the debate had waxed warm between Mrs.
Stanton--who opposed the admission of any more men (referring to the
negroes) to the political franchise, until the present arbiters of the
question were disposed to admit women also--and Mr. Downing and Dr.
Purvis, of Washington, an elegant looking gentleman arose upon impulse
and began to talk in his seat, but, after a little hesitancy, accepted
the invitation of Mrs. Mott and Miss Anthony to take the platform. As
he stood up before the audience, he appeared a tall, slender, elderly
gentleman, with the white hair and other marks of years, at least not
less than sixty, graced with a handsome face of the highest type,
strikingly fine in character. I have seen many nations and conditions
of people, and I do not fear to say with some regard for my reputation
as an observer--that I believe it one of the most benevolent and
exalted faces--one of the most elevated and least mixed with the
animal and earthly alloys of our humanity, that adorn the whole globe.
He spoke but a few words. They were all of the character of the
generous impulse upon which he rose. In his gratitude for what those
noble women had done for the colored race, _with which he was
identified_, he was willing to wait for the ballot for himself, his
sons, and his race, until women were permitted to enjoy it. The
speaker was Robert Purvis, of Philadelphia, Dr. Purvis's father. By
the gas light of the hall, he not only appeared to be a white man, but
a light complexioned white man. It may be that he has one
thirty-second--possibly one-sixteenth--negro blood in his veins. There
is so little in effect, that the whole make-up of the man is after the
highest pattern of white men. Besides--to descend a little--Mr. Purvis
is a gentleman of wealth and culture, and surrounds his family with
all the gratifications of the intellectual, esthetic and moral
desires, and carefully developed his children at home and at the best
schools into which they could gain admission.--_Correspondence of the
Denver News._

[115] _Resolved_, That governments among men have hitherto signally
failed, their history being but a series of revolutions, bloodshed,
and desolation.

_Resolved_, That a democracy based on a republicanism which proscribes
and disfranchises one part of the citizens for their sex, and another
for their color, is a contradiction in terms more offensive and harder
to be borne than despotism itself, under its true name, and vastly
more dangerous by its seductive influence to human well-being.

_Resolved_, That we demand, as the only assurance of national
perpetuity and peace, as well as a measure of Justice and right, that
in the reconstruction of the Government suffrage shall be based on
loyalty and intelligence, and nowhere be limited by odious
distinctions on account of color, or sex.

_Resolved_, That we earnestly recommend to the friends of equal
suffrage in all the States to call a convention at their respective
capitals during the sessions of their Legislatures, and that
committees be appointed to memorialize those bodies on the subject of
suffrage alike impartial for men and women, and that as far as
possible able and earnest women obtain a hearing before them, to urge
the necessity and justice of their claim.

_Resolved_, That we denounce the proposition now pending in Congress
to abolish the elective franchise in the District of Columbia, as it
tends to make the disfranchisement of the 25,000 women of the
District, and the lately enfranchised colored men perpetual.

_Resolved_, That in demanding the ballot for the disfranchised
classes, we do not overlook the logical fact of the right to be voted
for; and we know no reason why a colored man should be excluded from a
seat in Congress, or any woman either, who possesses the suitable
capabilities, and has been duly elected.

_Resolved_, That we demand of the Government, and of the public also,
that women and colored people shall choose their own occupations, and
be paid always equally with men for equal work.

_Resolved_, That a _man's_ government is worse than a _white_ man's
government, because, in proportion as you increase the tyrants, you
make the condition of the disfranchised class more hopeless and
degraded.

_Resolved_, That as the partisan cry of a white man's government
created the antagonism between the Irishman and the negro, culminating
in those fearful riots in 1863, so the Republican cry of manhood
suffrage creates the same antagonism between the negro and the woman,
and must result, especially in the Southern States, in greater
injustice toward woman.

[116] ANNIVERSARY OF THE AMERICAN EQUAL RIGHTS ASSOCIATION.

The American Equal Rights Association will hold its Anniversary in New
York, at Steinway Hall, Wednesday and Thursday, May 12th and 13th, and
in Brooklyn, Academy of Music, on Friday, the 14th.

After a century of discussion on the rights of citizens in a republic,
and the gradual extension of suffrage, without property or educational
qualifications, to all white men, the thought of the nation has turned
for the last thirty years to negroes and women.

And in the enfranchisement of black men by the Fourteenth and
Fifteenth Amendments to the Federal Constitution, the Congress of the
United States has now virtually established on this continent an
aristocracy of sex; an aristocracy hitherto unknown in the history of
nations.

With every type and shade of manhood thus exalted above their heads,
there never was a time when all women, rich and poor, white and black,
native and foreign, should be so wide awake to the degradation of
their position, and so persistent in their demands to be recognized in
the government.

Woman's enfranchisement is now a practical question in England and the
United States.



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