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Mrs. GRIFFING read
an interesting letter from Mrs. Frances D. Gage:

More than one-half of the "people," are to-day without the
right of franchise, and can exert no power in the
government, and have no voice in electing its
representatives. They have no voice in making the laws under
which they live. If they commit offenses they are punished
the same as voters. If they have property it is taxed
precisely the same and for the same purposes as is the
property of the voter. Government money and lands and
revenues are appropriated for schools, colleges, and
institutions of learning by the voters for their own use,
while the non-voters are debarred all rights and privileges
in the same. And it may be said that the disfranchised "have
no rights that the enfranchised are bound to respect." ... A
government that fails to execute its own laws and mocks at
its own enactments, can not be respected by its people. We
therefore demand that our representatives "shall guarantee
to every State in this Union a republican form of
government;" that the right of suffrage be guaranteed to all
persons of sound mind and adult years, without regard to
race, color, or sex.

Respectfully, FRANCES D. GAGE.

Rev. SAMUEL J. MAY said this movement was the most radical one
ever proposed to the civilized world. America had suffered
severely because it had violated the rights of 4,000,000 people.
If the rights of 15,000,000 were much longer violated, severer
suffering still would be induced.

CHARLOTTE B. WILBOUR said: In demanding suffrage for women we are
not making any innovation on political principles, but only
attempting to restore the broken connection between practice and
profession. A steady, constant, palpable ignoring of the
application of great truths, like the claim of woman's rights,
and the equality of all before the law, begets a reckless manner
of assertion, an illogical application of premises, and thence a
sort of organic dishonesty of mind which is carried into practice
almost unconsciously. Every subject of a government who has not a
voice in its conduct is openly degraded, and must be something
more or less than human not to show it in the conduct of his
life. We demand the ballot for women in the name of that very
domesticity which is urged against it, of that home whose peace
has always been more marred by passive servility and masculine
authority than by any over-assertion of individuality, on the
part of the so-called partner.

Speeches were also made by Mr. Hinton of Washington, and Miss
Phoebe Couzins.

Miss ANTHONY called upon Senator Sherman, of Ohio, to address the
meeting, who expressed himself highly pleased with the convention
to which he only came as a listener. The following letters were
then read:


SYRACUSE, January 18, 1870.

Mrs. M. J. GAGE--_Dear Friend_: I doubt not this meeting
will urge emphatically upon Congress the duty of striking
the word "male" from the suffrage bill for the District of
Columbia. It is a gross injustice, a _shame_ that such a
term should be in any legal paper defining citizenship in
any civilized State, especially a shame that it should stand
in a bill touching suffrage, in what ought to be the model
District, the choice sample ground of wise and just
government for the _model republic_. Let an indignant
protest and admonition go up in regard to this matter from
your convention, that Congress shall not dare to disregard.
I trust also that the convention will urge upon Congress the
eminent fitness and duty of passing without delay the XVI.
Amendment, and submitting the same to the Legislatures of
the several States for ratification.

The world is moving to-day in the direction of the abolition
of all monopolies of privilege and that of equal and exact
justice and fair play to all classes. Woman now has the
floor; the hour has struck for her. Wyoming and Colorado are
already setting example for the older communities. Let the
preaching of this faith in effective ways, its benign and
thorough working, begin at Jerusalem, at the Capitol of the
nation, and may your convention urge the work to immediate
undertaking, aye, and completion then, at home.

Yours truly, CHAS. D. B. MILLS.


CORNELL UNIVERSITY, ITHACA, N. Y., Jan. 17, 1870.

Mrs. M. JOSLYN GAGE--_Dear Madam_: I beg you to be assured
that I heartily sympathize with all well directed efforts to
secure to woman equality before the law. Whatever can be
done to give her a fair and equal chance with man, is due to
her, and no effort of mine shall be wanting to secure so
desirable a consummation.

Very respectfully yours, HOMER B. SPRAGUE.

Mrs. Helen Taylor, of London, after expressing the wish that she
might be with us, says:

It is a great delight to hear of the numerous societies, in
various countries, working well and vigorously for that
justice which for so long has been denied to women. The time
can not be far distant now, when we shall attain the right
of expressing our opinion by giving a vote.

Letters joining in the demand for a XVI. Amendment were received
from E. H. G. Clarke, of Troy, N. Y.; S. D. Dillaye, of Syracuse;
Martha B. Dickinson, Sarah Pugh, Mrs. E. K. Pugh, Abby Kimber, of
Philadelphia; Mrs. Mary J. O'Donovan-Rossa, and Hon. Jacob H.
Ela. The following extracts from private letters of Mrs. Hooker
show somewhat the spirit of the occasion.


WASHINGTON, January 19, 1870.

I have just come from a good meeting; just such a house as
we had at Hartford the mornings of our Convention. Senator
Pomeroy spoke admirably, and carried every one with him.
Then came Olympia Brown, and nothing could have been better
than her speech and the effect of it on the audience, which,
by the way, was earnest and intelligent. But Madam Anneke,
the German patriot who fought with her husband and slept
beside her horse in the field, carried the day over everyone
else. It was fairly overwhelming to hear her English, so
surcharged with feeling, yet so exact in the choice of
words, and the burden of it all was that the trials of the
battle-field were as naught compared to this inward struggle
of her soul toward liberty for woman. Her presence,
gestures, oratory, were simply magnificent.

Mrs. F., of Cincinnati, who lives here now, came to me this
morning with great warmth, saying she had brought two
Senators' wives who were opposed, and they said a few more
such women as Olympia Brown would convert them. She has
promised to bring them to our reception at the Arlington
this evening.

_Jan. 20._--We have had to hold a three days' meeting,
interest grew so fast. Yesterday morning Lincoln Hall
jammed, even aisles full. I never heard better speaking in
my life, not a disturbance in the audience, not a jar on the
platform, all loving, tender, earnest. Olympia Brown is
wonderful; she talked Christ and His Gospel just I should
have done with her voice and practice; can't enlarge, but
she surely is a remarkable woman. We are to have a hearing
by a committee from both Houses on Saturday, and Senator
Pomeroy will present a bill for suffrage in the District of
Columbia next week, and would not be much surprised if it
were carried at once--does not really expect that--but
Senator Trumbull, Chairman of Judiciary, says he shall vote
for it, and so do many others in both Houses. Mrs. Pomeroy
received yesterday afternoon, and to my surprise, nearly all
her callers had been at the Convention--at least three
hundred young ladies were in the hall, they said, and all
spoke with perfect respect of the movement--many seemed in
sympathy with it.

_Jan. 21, two o'clock._--Just from the Committee Room, and
too full to write. Mrs. Stanton standing at the head of the
long table (Committee all round the table, Sumner so
attentive as to fix my eyes upon him with intense interest,
watching changes of expression) read a magnificent argument.
Mrs. Davis and Miss Anthony followed, and then sitting in my
chair, I made a five minutes' talk on my favorite
point--personal responsibility God's only method in human
affairs. Then questions from various gentlemen and
conversation all round the room for two hours. The large
room was full of gentlemen and ladies, and there were
congratulations without stint, but Sumner, grandest of all,
approaching Mrs. Stanton and myself, said in a deep voice,
really full of emotion, "I have been in this place, ladies,
for twenty years; I have followed or led in every movement
toward liberty and enfranchisement; but I have it to say to
you now, that I never attended such a committee meeting as
this in my life, it exceeds all that I have ever witnessed."

Mrs.



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