A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
In all
those lectures she showed the low estimate of woman, and her
inferior education.

To this heroic woman, who left ease, elegance, a high social
circle of rich culture, and with true self-abnegation gave her
life, in the country of her adoption, to the teaching of her
highest idea of truth, it is fitting that we pay a tribute of
just, though late, respect. Her writings are of the purest and
noblest character, and whatever there is of error in them is
easily thrown aside. The spider sucks poison from the same flower
from which the bee gathers honey; let us therefore ask if the
evil be not in ourselves before we condemn others. Pharisaism,
then as now, was ready to stone the prophet of freedom. She bore
the calumny, reproach and persecution to which she was subjected
for the truth, as calmly as Socrates. Looking down from the
serene heights of her philosophy she pitied and endured the
scoffs and jeers of the multitude, and fearlessly continued to
utter her rebukes against oppression, ignorance and bigotry.
Women joined in the hue and cry against her, little thinking that
men were building the gallows and making them the executioners.
Women have crucified in all ages the redeemers of their own sex,
and men mock them with the fact. It is time now that we trample
beneath our feet this ignoble public sentiment which men have
made for us; and if others are to be crucified before we can be
redeemed, let men do the cruel, cowardly work; but let us learn
to hedge womanhood round with generous, protecting love and care.
Then men will learn, as they should, that this system of
traducing women is no longer to be used as a means for their
subjugation. Let us learn to demand that all men who come into
our presence be as pure as they claim that woman should be. Let
the test be applied which Christ gave, that if any is without sin
in word, or deed, or thought, he shall "cast the first stone."...

When the war ended and National reconstruction commenced, women,
feeling an equal interest in having the work rightly done,
presented their petitions for the right of suffrage, but were
coolly told by those who were most eager to enfranchise the
negro, "stand aside and wait, it is the black man's hour." The
sacrifice of their sons on the altar of freedom was not counted
to them as anything. Their years of toil and weary watching in
camp and hospital were not to be put in the scale with the black
man's, who fought for his own freedom. Such wrong and injustice
is bearing its fruits, in the confusion of the councils of the
Republican party. Like the French of 1848, they refused to deal
justly with the mothers of the nation, and are now reaping a
bitter reward. They dared to suppress the petitions of thousands
of women, and now disintegration has begun; the handwriting is
seen on the wall. Thus injustice has done its work, and thousands
of women have been roused by it to protest who had never before
given any thought to public affairs.

The National Convention, held in the Church of the Puritans,
after the war, was one of intense interest, and marked an era in
this movement. The demand for suffrage became paramount--the only
one with many. Mrs. Stanton, in 1867, went before the Judiciary
Committee of the New York Legislature, asking universal suffrage
to be recognized by the Constitutional Convention which was to be
held. About this time a bill was before a Committee of the
Legislature, the purport of which was to legalize prostitution
Reading this bill in the presence of the Committee, her quick
mind comprehended all its horrors at a glance, and she tried the
test of asking each man if he would be willing that that law
should be applied to his daughter, his sister, or any one dear to
him. Self-ism answered "No." "Then, gentlemen," said she,
"legislate for the poorer daughters of the State as you would for
your own." All that winter she battled against that hideous
system, which would legalize the foulest of sins, and to her
efforts, mainly, the delay of passing that law is due. She made a
clear exposition of that cruel, corrupt, one-sided legislation,
which subjects woman to the grossest indignities, while men are
benefited and allowed safe and unlimited license. To her
lectures, also, is due a healthier tone of public sentiment on
the marriage question. It is slowly beginning to be felt that in
that relation there is a vast amount of legalized prostitution.

In 1867 an extensive lecturing tour through Kansas was made by
Mrs. Stanton, Miss Anthony, Rev. Olympia Brown, Henry Blackwell,
and Lucy Stone. The proposition of striking the words "white
male" from the Constitution had been submitted to the people, and
the result of the campaign was one third the vote of the State in
favor of both propositions. Of Miss Brown, now preaching in New
England, we can not forbear saying we have few in our ranks more
earnest, honest, or devoted. A clear, incisive intellect, a true
heart and firm purpose mark her every day life. She is
unobtrusive and gentle, but always ready at the call of duty. On
this campaign they were joined by a new worker, George Francis
Train, whether for good or ill it will be for history to decide.
Certain it is, that a new impulse was given to the cause, and
_The Revolution_ established, with Susan B. Anthony as
proprietor, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Parker Pillsbury as
editors, has done a great work. It has been hated, abused,
slandered, misquoted, and garbled; nevertheless, it has been a
terror to evil doers, and a help to those who would do well.
Others, thinking to do better, have started monthly and weekly
papers....

In May, 1869, at the annual meeting of the Equal Rights Society,
which had been three years in existence, a change of name was
proposed. Notice was given to that effect, and at a large
meeting, in which nineteen States were represented, the National
Woman Suffrage Society was formed, which has done most efficient
service, holding conventions in many of our large cities, and
awakening thought and action. In Saratoga and Newport a new class
was reached. Wearied with the monotony of fashionable dissipation
and the driveling idiocy of flirtations, women were glad to hear
a few sensible, wholesome truths.

In December, 1869, an able report was received from Mrs. Kate N.
Doggett, one of the six delegates to the Labor Convention, in
Berlin. In the spring of 1869 a fresh impulse was given to the
work in the establishment of the Woman's Bureau, by Mrs.
Elizabeth B. Phelps. Its discontinuance was due to the same cause
which has thwarted so many plans of women. There were not a
sufficient number possessed of wealth who had the will to render
this a permanent institution. Mrs. Phelps possesses in an eminent
degree all the requisites for such a post--a queenly hospitality,
elegant manners, fine conversational ability, with a generous
catholic spirit. Delicacy forbids saying all that the heart
prompts of friends.... In November, 1869, a delegate convention
was held in Cleveland, Ohio, and a society organized, called the
American Woman's Suffrage Society. Its work is yet to be done.
The crowning act of 1869, and the one which gave an omen for the
year that was approaching, was the enfranchising of the women of
Wyoming and Utah. For these acts of justice we are most grateful.
A correspondent says:

The cause of woman in Wyoming goes bravely on. At the last
sitting of the District Court in Albany County, both the
Grand and Petit Juries were equally composed of either sex;
and Chief-Justice Howe, presiding, took advantage of this
occasion to compliment, in the highest terms, the
intelligence, discrimination, honesty, and propriety of the
conduct with which the women acquitted themselves last
session, saying they had gone far to vindicate the policy,
justify the experiment, and realize the expectations of
those who had clothed themselves with the right. The bar,
the bench, and the intelligent men of the country had long
felt that something was needed to improve and justify our
jury system; something to lift it above prejudice and
passion, and imbue it with a higher regard for law, justice,
oath, and conscience. His Honor then expressed the opinion
that the introduction of the new element furnished good
reason to expect that to women we should ultimately be
indebted for those reforms which the unaided exertions of
men had been incompetent to effect.

This is certainly a most flattering presentment of the results of
enfranchising the sex in Wyoming, and what is better, it seems
substantially a just one. The question will therefore naturally
suggest itself, if women, in their new political capacity, are
thus able to "tone" the rude elements of Western civilization,
what inconsistency is there in granting them like privileges in
communities whose superior refinement is so much less likely to
expose them to insult or mortification? In Utah it is of less
account, because the women there are under a hierarchy, and as
yet vote only as directed.

In January, 1870, a convention was called in Washington by the
officers of the National Society. This meeting, large in
attendance and deeply earnest, marked an historical era, the
influence of which can not be estimated. A hearing before the
joint committee of the House and Senate of the District was
asked, in order to present the question of woman suffrage, and
granted.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.