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Mary F. Davis has been from the first a most able and
efficient advocate; her winning, gentle manners, her courtesy and
respect for the rights of others have been unvarying. If not
herself aggressive, she has never faltered in her adherence to
the fullest truth; in this she is always sustained by her
husband, Andrew Jackson Davis, who has never hesitated or
temporized on any great question. Among business women who have
gone steadily on in the path of duty, the name of Charlotte
Fowler Wells stands out conspicuously. For over thirty years she
has been an equal in all business relations with her husband,
conducting the extensive correspondence of the house, as well as
being head book-keeper. Her serene face gives evidence of a life
of quiet, self-respecting independence.

Mrs. Frances V. Hallock and sister, Mrs. Robert Dale Owen, hold a
place worthy of honorable mention for their good works and steady
adherence to truth, and their clear, quick comprehension of its
far-reaching power. Rev. Phebe Hanaford, pastor of a church in
New Haven, Conn., has done a great work for woman. She is the
mother of a family, and finds time not only to conduct their
education, but to preach regularly every Sabbath, to write books
of merit, and to superintend her domestic affairs, which are
managed with skill, economy and good taste. Always cheerful and
kindly, she wins many friends, not only to herself but for the
cause. There is another movement that began in this decade now
closed upon us, which properly belongs to its history, viz: that
of the Working Women. It has been represented from Boston by Miss
Jennie Collins, a slight woman, all brain and soul. She tells her
stories with such a tender, natural pathos that few eyes are dry
during her speeches. She makes no pretense, but gives most
unmistakable evidence of a rich nature that has been repressed
and tortured. She is the type of a large class that will develop
into beautiful, symmetrical characters when the shackles are
broken and women are free.

Conventions and organizations have so multiplied that it would
require a volume to give their history. The chief of these are
the great Northwestern and Pacific Slope Associations. Added to
these are the State Societies in nearly all the Northern and
Middle States. A State Society was organized in Richmond,
Virginia, in April, 1870, by Matilda Joslyn Gage, a woman of wide
historical information. Lectures have been given in several of
the Southern States by individuals.

If the notices of women are by far more numerous than those of
men,[134] it is not from forgetfulness of their services, for I
credit them with all sincerity of motive, and nobleness in the
wish for our enfranchisement. I have given, as briefly as
possible, the two decades from 1850 to 1870. I have set down
nothing in malice, and what is omitted must be charged to want of
space and time. When the full history of this work is written,
differences which have retarded its progress, and the wide range
of action and reaction can be gone into if the historian so
wills. I have endeavored to keep this report free from
sectionalism and faction, believing that the _finale_ would bring
together all parties in one glad day of rejoicing. That there
will be political parties in the future, with women, as with men,
there can be no question; but that the sexes will have a
purifying influence, each upon the other, is already conceded
even by the opposers.

In closing this _resume_ permit me to say that this meager
outline, condensed from notes made from year to year, in no way
satisfies the writer, but has been given by the earnest
solicitations of friends, who wished that the steady progress of
the cause might be marked in this retrospective hour. There is
much that should have been embodied in this sketch of the past,
especially the resolutions which have marked varying phases of
the work, and which seemed like a divine inspiration in their
comprehensive grasp and far-reaching thought, on this the last
great question of reform.

Mrs. Mott rose at the conclusion of Mrs. Davis' history of the
work for the past twenty years, and expressed herself as greatly
pleased with its succinct and careful preparation. She felt that
it was of great importance to the future work that this history
be preserved, and hoped it would be published as part of the
proceedings of this meeting. She felt that we had lost in not
having kept more careful record of the progress of the work. She
was sorry Mrs. Davis had not said more of herself, as she had
done much toward opening the medical profession to women, and
also in making lecturing a lucrative and respectable profession
for them. She was, I believe, the first woman to claim the right
to equal pay with men for her lectures. Mrs. Stanton expressed
the same pleasure in listening to the report, and satisfaction in
its historical accuracy. Resolutions[135] which had been
prepared by the Committee, were offered for discussion. Mrs.
Gage spoke of the advance in the cause of education for women,
and reviewed the progress in each particular branch of science.
Letters from various parts of the world were read by Mrs.
Griffing and Mrs. Lillie Devereux Blake, the latter of whom
demonstrated in an amusing and forcible manner that the women of
our country did not form a part of the "people," according to the
various banners and posters displayed about the streets in
reference to the coming election. Woman did want to vote; she did
love her country; but because she was not one of the "people,"
that privilege was denied her. Miss Anthony made several
characteristic, short speeches at intervals, in a style which is
peculiarly her own. Her force and humor were fully appreciated by
the audience, who applauded her repeatedly. Her appeals for money
met with great favor. The Rev. Olympia Brown made a stirring
speech in reference to woman's work in the cause of the "social
evil," speaking at some length upon the action of the women of
England on the subject. Mr. Crozier, of Brooklyn, was the only
gentleman who spoke, and he acquitted himself very creditably in
his confession upon joining the cause of woman's rights.

Several resolutions were offered in reference to the European
war, and much sympathy was expressed with the present suffering
originated by it. The improved condition of Italy was also
referred to. The Convention was a highly interesting one in many
particulars, and the pioneers of the cause who engaged in active
service twenty years ago proved themselves as ardent as in the
early days.

The following letters were read:

26 HEREFORD SQUARE, LONDON.

DEAR MADAM:--I received your kind letter some weeks ago, and
beg to apologize for the delay of this reply. Pray accept my
thanks for your kind expressions regarding my small efforts
to keep alive the great cause we have all so near at heart.
I regret to hear that one who, like yourself, has been a
pioneer on the way when the path was the ruggedest, should
for many years have been incapacitated from aiding its
progress. May you now be restored fully to activity. We
certainly want all true workers, albeit the progress of the
cause surpasses our most sanguine expectations, on that as
well as on this side of the Atlantic.

Pray accept my thanks for your kind invitation to your
Convention. It will not, I think, ever be likely that I
shall visit America, but I shall always read with deep
interest of all that goes forward there. Accept, dear madam,
my thanks for your kindness and sincere regard.

Mrs. P. W. DAVIS. FRANCES POWER COBBE.


MORNINGSIDE, EDINBURGH, Sept. 24, 1870.

MADAM:--I regret that I am unable to accept the invitation
with which you have honored me, for I have been an invalid
for some months, and am not sufficiently well to undertake
any journey. I can assure you that the cause of woman is
gradually but firmly gaining ground in Scotland, and that
each month we are gaining in the right direction. At present
there are six female medical students studying in our
university. The College of Surgeons has thrown its doors
open, without any restriction, to the female student.

The Merchants' Maiden Company has, within the last few
months, opened large schools in connection with its
hospitals, offering as its prizes Bursaries in the
university to girls as well as boys, which I think is one of
the strongest moves which as yet has been made in behalf of
women. The petition in favor of the medical education of
women was largely signed in Scotland. The Society for the
higher education of Women is progressing well and the
professors spoke highly of the efficiency of their working
pupils. In the university classes of botany and natural
history all the female students were in the honor list, and
Miss Edith Pechey was the first chemistry student for the
year.

With best wishes and thanks to you and your committee for
your kind invitation, I am truly yours,

S. K. KINGSLEY, for HENRY KINGSLEY.


ALDERLEY EDGE, near MANCHESTER, Sept.



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