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K. KINGSLEY, for HENRY KINGSLEY.


ALDERLEY EDGE, near MANCHESTER, Sept. 26, 1870.

MADAM:--I beg to thank you for the circular and your
accompanying note, both inviting me to attend the Twentieth
Anniversary of the inauguration of the Woman Suffrage
Movement in the United States, to be held in New York on the
20th and 21st of October. I have once traveled through your
country with very much pleasure, and, I hope, with some
profit, and I have a strong desire to come again; but as it
is impossible for me to do so now, I can not attend your
meeting. I need not say that I sympathize with your object.
It seems to me to be inconsistent with the principles of
your Government, and of ours, to deny to women the power to
control those who legislate for them. Until they obtain this
control through the suffrage, they will suffer many
disadvantages and be the victims of unequal laws. How soon
they will obtain it must depend mainly upon their own
efforts. In the meantime the present agitation will give
them an interest in many public questions, will in itself be
an education in preparation for political power, and will
exercise an influence in favor of more equal legislation
between men and women.

Very truly yours,

Mrs. P. W. DAVIS. JACOB BRIGHT.


FROM MRS. DR. TAYLOR.

NOTTING HILL, August 10, 1870.

DEAR MADAM:--I cordially thank you for your kind request
that I should attend your Convention in October. It is quite
impossible for me to leave England now, but I am deputed by
our London Committee for Woman's Suffrage to express their
sympathy with your movement, and the hope that the efforts
you are making will be crowned with success, and that Mrs.
Lucretia Mott will live to see the fruit of some of her good
and noble work.

Believe me yours truly, M. TAYLOR.


FROM LADY AMBERLY.

RODBOROUGH MANOR, STROUD, July 14, 1870.

DEAR MADAM:--I thank you much for your invitation to attend
your second decade meeting of the Woman's Suffrage
Association. I regret that it will not be in my power to
accept it. Much as I enjoyed my visit to America, it is
rather too far to undertake a second journey there. You
must, indeed be glad, after twenty years of work, to see the
great advance in public opinion on this question. It seems
now to be progressing very fast. I have just aided in
establishing a committee at Stroud, and we hope soon to have
one in every borough in England for female suffrage.

Yours truly,
Mrs. P. W. DAVIS. KATE AMBERLY.


280 PARK ROAD, SOUTH HILL, LIVERPOOL.

DEAR MADAM:--Mrs. Butler regrets very much not to have been
able to write to you before, and begs you will kindly accept
her apologies as well as her thanks for your invitation to
your Decade Meeting. I have the honor and privilege to be at
present Mrs. Butler's Secretary. She is overwhelmed with
work, and would be thankful for your sympathy in it. I wish
I could give you a clear idea of the battle she has to
fight, but it is very difficult for me, as a German, to put
it in adequate words.

Mrs. Butler's introductory essay to "Woman's Work and
Woman's Culture" only gives a faint idea of her character
and strivings, compared to the grand reality of her life.
She has devoted more than fifteen years to the rescue of
"fallen women"--a work that requires more active charity and
self-denial than any other. The English Parliament passed,
some time ago, certain acts called the Contagious Disease
Acts, as a sanitary measure, on the model of Continental
legislation. To earnest, religious minds, like Mrs.
Butler's, the acts appear immoral in principle, as declaring
vice a necessity; unjust, as inflicting penalties on women
and letting men go free; and cruel in their application,
enrolling women in a degraded class, making their return to
virtue almost impossible. I think if I tell you that by
these acts a woman can be arrested by a policeman on
suspicion of being a prostitute, and subjected to an
examination which amounts to a surgical operation, always
disgraceful, sometimes injurious, even dangerous, I have
made quite clear to an American lady that such a state of
things can not be endured.

The best English women, with Mrs. Butler and Miss
Nightingale as leaders, stand up nobly for the poor,
degraded women whom, with their true Christian hearts, they
still recognize as sisters. Mrs. Butler, who is rather
delicate, devotes all her strength to this cause at present.
She travels much, has been in the garrison towns, where, for
the benefit of the soldiers, these atrocious acts are in
force, and in large meetings denounces the cruelties to
women. By her efforts more than sixty thousand signatures
have been obtained for the repeal of the acts. Many good
men, I am thankful to say, are on our side, and it is a
matter of congratulation that in this point many people join
who widely differ in other respects. I firmly believe that
this question, which can no longer be avoided, will produce
a great social reform. Women who timidly keep aloof from all
political movements, after this experience of male
legislation, eagerly demand the suffrage.

I am sure you will forgive Mrs. Butler for not writing
herself. As soon as she has a little more breathing time she
is sure to write, but she fears she will never be able to
cross the Atlantic.

Yours sincerely, ROSA BRUHN.
Mrs. P. W. DAVIS.


PARIS, RUE NOLLET 92, 7th September.

DEAR MADAME:--I burned the answer I had written to you under
the shameful government now fallen, and whose crimes and
treasons extorted from me cries of despair for the ruin they
have brought on our country.

I thank you for the generous sympathy you express toward us
in our great woe. Your honored names have been blessed for
this by our French hearts. We are now relieved, and though
our actual peril is none the less, we are in possession of
our own force. We are rid of the despicable robbers of our
honor, our fortune and our lives; and in the most terrible
energy, is a consolation and support. Better is it to die
with honor than live dishonored. How happy you are to be
born on a soil not infested by monarchical roots. They are
like dog-grass, which springs up again and again, nurtured
by the ignorance of our rural population. When the Prussians
shall have been driven away, we may have civil struggles to
fear from the emissaries of this detested monarchy. What
avails experience to the blind.

I forwarded immediately your letter to George Sand. Accept
my heartfelt thanks for your fraternal invitation to me.

Yes, you say right, our hearts are wholly absorbed, and no
place is ours but Paris in this hour of supreme struggle and
sacrifice. We shall be with you in thought only, dear
sisters--you, the pioneers in woman's emancipation--your
names are enshrined in our hearts; but this crisis here will
not be useless for the cause. The women of Paris are noble
and courageous; one may hear them in every group encouraging
the men to desperate resistance. Everywhere they form
societies for the relief of the distressed and the wounded.
Many have petitioned for this revolution, and have
instigated men to the accomplishment of it. Many will take
arms in defense and fight; yea, fight with all the strength
which desperation lends, should the struggle reach our
streets.... They have already proved this sort of courage.
Men feel now how very necessary their co-operation is, and
after the crisis I hope they will not forget it. But it is
better that woman herself should learn to have a will, an
active opinion in public affairs, and this disposition will,
doubtless, continue to increase, as it has done for the last
two years.

Hail, dear and valiant sisters; blessed be your work in
which my heart, and many of those around me unite.

ANDRE LEO.

Mesdames PAULINA W. DAVIS, LUCRETIA MOTT, MARTHA WRIGHT,
ELIZABETH C. STANTON, ISABELLA B. HOOKER.


NAPLES, October 10, 1870.

DEAR MRS. DAVIS:--I have only now received your letter, or I
should sooner have expressed how highly I am gratified by
the honor you do me in asking my opinions with regard to
woman suffrage. I can not more strongly show my sympathy
with my accomplished sisters in the United States, than by
saying that I signed a petition to the British Parliament,
requesting permission for women to vote at the elections.



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