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was rejected, for the opposition and prejudices in the men
of Great Britain are still very strong against any change in
our condition. We have, however, gained a most important
privilege lately, chiefly through the liberality of the
University of Cambridge, in having the opportunity of
acquiring every branch of knowledge, literary and
scientific.

We owe much to the society of which you are the secretary,
for persevering in our behalf for twenty years under strong
opposition. The progress of civilization will ultimately
emancipate half the human race from the low position in
which we have hitherto been kept. Accept, dear Mrs. Davis,
my thanks for your letter, and believe me,

Very sincerely yours, MARY SOMERVILLE.


VICTORIA PRESS, LONDON, Oct. 3, 1870.

MY DEAR MRS. DAVIS AND MRS. STANTON:--Will you kindly let me
answer both your notes together, and assure you how much I
value the feeling which prompted you to write them. I shall
not easily part with either of those letters, although
pressure of work drives me to answer them in one, and say
that I am utterly unable to respond to your wish that I
should attend your Decade Meeting. Few things would give me
such satisfaction as to find myself in America, especially
after your noble invitations and promises of a cordial
reception everywhere. But--and how many buts there are in
life--I dare not leave my work at present in England. There
are several very important movements just now resting almost
entirely upon me, and having put my hand to the plow, I dare
not look back. I am at present the only regular lecturer
here on this subject, and I am full of engagements up to
April next--north, south, east, and west--and the discussion
society I have started in London is still too young to run
alone, and yet promises such good things for the future,
that I feel it ought to be carefully tended.

I can only add that I shall watch with great interest for
the accounts of your meeting on the 19th. I long for the day
when I can see you in the flesh--those with whose spirits I
now ever hold communion. Excuse haste. I have just returned
from the North, and find my table overwhelmed with
invitations to lecture and appeals for help. The learned
meetings and social discussions of the British Associations
at Liverpool, and the Social Science Congress at Newcastle,
have all been crowded into the last fortnight. Wishing you
and your noble workers God-speed, believe me,

Yours, most truly, EMILY FAITHFUL.


DEAR LADIES:--It would give me great pleasure to accept your
kind invitation to be present at your meeting to-day, if it
were possible, but it is not.

Go on with your great work; it is arduous, but it is
sublime! You are doing good that you know not of in old
Europe. You have taken the initiative, and she is following
hard after. I wish to recommend to you the appeal of Mme.
Gasparin to the American women to join in her heart-cry for
peace. Coming so recently as I have, from the seat of
war--from Paris and from Rome--I can testify to the earnest,
the beseeching appeal of European women to their sisters in
America to give them help in this their hour of calamity and
need--the help of sympathy, the succor of love!

The day before I left France, one of the noblest of French
women, Mademoiselle Daubie (the distinguished author of that
remarkable work, "The Poor Women of the Nineteenth Century,"
which every woman and legislator ought to read,) said to me:
"We are looking wistfully every whither for some hand
stretched out through the darkness, but, alas! there is
none. But you are going to America. Oh! tell the women there
to help us in this struggle with ignorance, corruption, and
war." Let us heed this cry.

France lies prostrate in the dust! But Rome is free! So in
all human sorrow there is some hope. Let us, then, lift up
the one by all possible help, remembering her greatness, and
pity her misfortunes; having faith in her capabilities, and
praying for her liberty--for that liberty that can only be
practicable when built upon intelligence and virtue, and
only real when woman is not the slave, but the helpmate of
man; and let us rejoice with that other sister--Italia--who
is now lifting up her face toward heaven, and after these
long years of anguish and waiting the mother is restored to
her children!

The rule of the Cęsars is gone, and the reign of absolutism
is passing away! And while the science of men goes flashing
round the earth--over sea and land--uniting the nations in
treaties of commerce and compacts of liberty, the warm,
generous heart of woman shall keep pace, uniting humanity in
sympathy and love.

I am, dear ladies, yours most respectfully,
EMELIA J. MERIMAN.[136]

The speakers during the day gave many delightful reminiscences of the
noble men and women who had given their earnest efforts to promote
this great reform, and dwelt with hope on the many encouraging steps
of progress that had marked the years since the initiative steps were
taken. The day before the Convention an elegant reception was held at
the St. James Hotel. Nearly two hundred persons called during the
afternoon, and about forty sat down to a sumptuous dinner.[137]

The Washington Convention of 1871[138] was thus described by _The
Republican_ of that city:

The third Annual National Woman's Suffrage Convention, held at
Lincoln Hall, was an unprecedented success. Its leading spirit
was Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker, who, together with Josephine S.
Griffing, Paulina Wright Davis, and Susan B. Anthony, made all
the preliminary arrangements, and managed the meeting. Mrs.
Hooker's zeal, activity, and amiability gave her the power to
make an easy conquest wherever she carries the banner of the good
cause. Her generalship in Washington marshalled hosts of new and
ardent friends into the movement. Five sessions were held, during
each of which the Convention was presided over by some member of
the Senate or House of Representatives; and it was a novel
feature to see such men as Senators Nye, Warren, and Wilson
sitting successively in the president's chair, apparently half
unconscious that it was one of greater honor than their familiar
seats in the Senate. Speeches were made by Adelle Hazlett,
Olympia Brown, Lilie Peckham, Isabella B. Hooker, Lillie Devereux
Blake, Cora Hatch Tappan, Susan B. Anthony, Kate Stanton,
Victoria C. Woodhull, Hon. A. G. Riddle (of the Washington bar),
Frederick Douglass, Senators Nye and Wilson, and Mara E. Post,
who made a journey all the way from Wyoming to attend the
Convention. A good deal was said by the speakers concerning the
proposed interpretation of the existing constitutional
amendments. It was thus a convention with a new idea. The
reporters could not say that only the old, stock arguments were
used. There was an air of novelty about the proceedings,
indicating healthy life in the movement. The consequence was that
the cause of woman's enfranchisement made a new, sudden, and
profound impression at Washington.

This Convention was remarkable for the absence of the usual long
series of resolutions covering every point of our demands.

Another peculiarity was the unusual amount of money that flowed into
the treasury, as the following letter, among many others of the same
character, shows:

MISS ANTHONY--I have this morning deposited $500 for the use
of the N. W. S. A., and I will give a check for the amount
as you desire it.

Washington, D. C. Mrs. M. M. CARTTER.

Letters were read from Mrs. Esther Morris,[139] Justice of the Peace
in Wyoming Territory, and from Mrs. Jane Graham Jones, of Chicago.
Senator Nye, who presided at the evening session, said, "He had not
given much thought to the question of Woman Suffrage, but it was his
opinion that in proportion as we elevated the mothers of voters, so
were the voters themselves elevated." The audiences during this
convention were large, and the press not only respectful but highly
complimentary.

It was just before this enthusiastic convention that Victoria Woodhull
presented her memorial to Congress and secured a hearing[140] before
the Judiciary Committee of the House, which called out the able
Minority Report, by William Loughridge, of Iowa, and Benjamin F.
Butler, of Massachusetts. The following is from the Congressional
_Globe_ of Dec. 21, 1870.

In the Senate: Mr. HARRIS presented the memorial of Victoria C.
Woodhull, praying for the passage of such laws as may be
necessary and proper for carrying into execution the right vested
by the Constitution in the citizens of the United States to vote
without regard to sex; which was referred to the Committee on the
Judiciary, and ordered to be printed.

In the House: Mr. JULIAN--I ask unanimous consent to present at
this time and have printed in the _Globe_ the memorial of
Victoria C. Woodhull, claiming the right of suffrage under the
XIV.



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