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Let her no longer be the mere reflector, the echo of the
worldly pride and ambition of man. (Applause). Had the women of
the North studied to know and to teach their sons the law of
justice to the black man, regardless of the frown or the smile of
pro-slavery priest and politician, they would not now be called
upon to offer the loved of their households to the bloody Moloch
of war. And now, women of the North, I ask you to rise up with
earnest, honest purpose, and go forward in the way of right,
fearlessly, as independent human beings, responsible to God alone
for the discharge of every duty, for the faithful use of every
gift, the good Father has given you. Forget conventionalisms;
forget what the world will say, whether you are in your place or
out of your place; think your best thoughts, speak your best
words, do your best works, looking to your own conscience for
approval.

Mrs. HOYT, of Wisconsin: Thus far this meeting has been conducted
in such a way as would lead one to suppose that it was an
anti-slavery convention. There are ladies here who have come
hundreds of miles to attend a business meeting of the Loyal Women
of the North; and good as anti-slavery conventions are, and
anti-slavery speeches are, in their way, I think that here we
should attend to our own business.

Mrs. CHALKSTONE, of California: My speech shall be as brief as
possible and I ask for an excuse for my broken language. Our
field is very small, and God has given us character and abilities
to follow it out. We do not need to stand at the ballot-boxes and
cast our votes, neither to stand and plead as lawyers; but in our
homes we have a great office. I consider women a great deal
superior to men. (Laughter and applause). Men are physically
strong, but women are morally better. I speak of pure women, good
women. It is woman who keeps the world in the balance.

I am from Germany, where my brothers all fought against the
Government and tried to make us free, but were unsuccessful. My
only son, seventeen years old, is in our great and noble army of
the Union. He has fought in many of the battles here, and I only
came from California to see him once more. I have not seen him
yet; though I was down in the camp, I could not get any pass. But
I am willing to lay down all this sacrifice for the cause of
liberty. We foreigners know the preciousness of that great, noble
gift a great deal better than you, because you never were in
slavery, but we are born in it. Germany pines for freedom. In
Germany we sacrificed our wealth and ornaments for it, and the
women in this country ought to do the same. We can not fight in
the battles, but we can do this, and it is all we can do. The
speaker, before me, remarked that Abraham Lincoln was two years
before he emancipated slaves. She thought it wrong. It took
eighteen hundred years in Europe to emancipate the Jews, and they
are not emancipated now. Among great and intelligent peoples like
Germany and France, until 1814 no Jew had the right to go on the
pavement; they had to go in the middle of the street, where the
horses walked! It took more than two years to emancipate the
people of the North from the idea that the negro was not a human
being, and that he had the right to be a free man. A great many
will find fault in the resolution that the negro shall be free
and equal, because our equal not every human being can be; but
free every human being has a right to be. He can only be equal in
his rights. (Applause).

Mrs. ROSE called for the reading of the resolutions, which after
a spirited discussion, all except the fifth, were unanimously
adopted.

Mrs. HOYT, of Wisconsin, said: _Mrs. President_--I object to the
passage of the fifth resolution, not because I object to the
sentiment expressed; but I do not think it is the time to bring
before this meeting, assembled for the purpose of devising the
best ways and means by which women may properly assist the
Government in its struggle against treason, anything which could
in the least prejudice the interest in this cause which is so
dear to us all. We all know that Woman's Rights as an _ism_ has
not been received with entire favor by the women of the country,
and I know that there are thousands of earnest, loyal, and able
women who will not go into any movement of this kind, if this
idea is made prominent. (Applause). I came here from Wisconsin
hoping to meet the earnest women of the country. I hoped that
nothing that would in any way damage the cause so dear to us all
would be brought forward by any of the members. I object to this,
because our object should be to maintain, as women properly may,
the integrity of our Government; to vindicate its authority; to
re-establish it upon a far more enduring basis. We can do this if
we do not involve ourselves in any purely political matter, or
any _ism_ obnoxious to the people. The one idea should be the
maintenance of the authority of the Government as it is, and the
integrity of the Republican idea. For this, women may properly
work, and I hope this resolution will not pass.

SARAH H. HALLECK, of Milton, N. Y.: I would make the suggestion
that those who approve of this resolution can afford to give way,
and allow that part of it which is objectionable to be stricken
out. The negroes have suffered more than the women, and the
women, perhaps, can afford to give them the preference. Let it
stand as regards them, and blot out the word "woman." It may
possibly be woman's place to suffer. At any rate, let her suffer,
if, by that means, _man_kind may suffer less.

A VOICE: You are too self-sacrificing.

ERNESTINE L. ROSE: I always sympathize with those who seem to be
in the minority. I know it requires a great deal of moral courage
to object to anything that appears to have been favorably
received. I know very well from long experience how it feels to
stand in a minority of one; and I am glad that my friend on the
other side (Mrs. Halleck) has already added one to make a
minority of two, though that is by far too small to be
comfortable. I, for one, object to the proposition to throw woman
out of the race for freedom. (Applause). And do you know why?
Because she needs freedom for the freedom of man. (Applause). Our
ancestors made a great mistake in not recognizing woman in the
rights of man. It has been justly stated that the negro at
present suffers more than woman, but it can do him no injury to
place woman in the same category with him. I, for one, object to
having that term stricken out, for it can have no possible
bearing against anything that we want to promote: we desire to
promote human rights and human freedom. It can do no injury, but
must do good, for it is a painful fact that woman under the law
has been in the same category with the slave. Of late years she
has had some small privileges conceded to her. Now, mind, I say
_conceded_; for publicly it has not yet been recognized by the
laws of the land that she has a right to an equality with man. In
that resolution it simply states a fact, that in a republic based
upon freedom, woman, as well as the negro, should be recognized
as an equal with the whole human race. (Applause)

ANGELINE G. WELD: _Mrs. President_--I rejoice exceedingly that
that resolution should combine us with the negro. I feel that we
have been with him; that the iron has entered into our souls.
True, we have not felt the slave-holder's lash; true, we have not
had our hands manacled, but our _hearts_ have been crushed. Was
there a single institution in this country that would throw open
its doors to the acknowledgment of woman's equality with man in
the race for science and the languages, until Oberlin, Antioch,
Lima, and a very few others opened their doors, twenty years ago?
Have I not heard women say--I said thus to my own brother, as I
used to receive from him instruction and reading: "Oh, brother,
that I could go to college with you! that I could have the
instruction you do! but I am crushed! I hear nothing, I know
nothing, except in the fashionable circle." A teacher said to a
young lady, who had been studying for several years, on the day
she finished her course of instruction, "I thought you would be
very glad that you were so soon to go home, so soon to leave your
studies." She looked up, and said, "What was I made for? When I
go home I shall live in a circle of fashion and folly. I was not
made for embroidery and dancing; I was made a woman; but I can
not be a true woman, a full-grown woman, in America."

Now, my friends, I do not want to find fault with the past. I
believe that men did for women the best that they knew how to do.
They did not know their own rights; they did not recognize the
rights of any man who had a black face. We can not wonder that,
in their tenderness for woman, they wanted to shelter and protect
her, and they made those laws from true, human, generous
feelings. Woman was then too undeveloped to demand anything else.
But woman is full-grown to-day, whether man knows it or not,
equal to her rights, and equal to the responsibilities of the
hour. I want to be identified with the negro; until he gets his
rights, we never shall have ours. (Applause).

SUSAN B. ANTHONY: This resolution brings in no question, no
_ism_. It merely makes the assertion that in a true democracy, in
a genuine republic, every citizen who lives under the government
must have the right of representation.



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