A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
We pray you to report immediately, as Mrs.
Hooker has said, "favorably, if you can, adversely, if you must."
We can wait no longer.

In the House, on January 24, 1872, the following discussion took
place:

Mr. BUTLER, of Massachusetts.--I ask unanimous consent, out of
the usual course of the rules, to present a petition.

The SPEAKER.--Is there objection? The Chair hears none.

Mr. BUTLER, of Massachusetts.--I am honored with the duty of
presenting a petition for a declaratory law to assure the right
of suffrage to the women citizens of the United States. They
believe their absolute constitutional right is to vote. They here
and now desire to bring to the attention of Congress the
necessity of passing a new law declaring and executing that
right. They claim such a law in two views: first, as of right,
and secondly, as of expediency to the nation. They insist that
this their right ought to be secured to them by law, and they
insist also that it is expedient for the Republic that this right
should be accorded to them.

The mothers of the land, who shall form the characters of all its
citizens through their teaching in childhood, giving direction to
the thoughts which shall hereafter govern the land, may well
claim that it is expedient that they shall have a voice in making
the laws which govern them, which will give them greater freedom
of action than they now have, which will afford them higher
opportunities for noble culture than they now have, and raise
their thoughts to a plane worthy of the generation that shall
come after us, which must in all its social and moral qualities
take its impress from their teachings, so that the men of the
land shall then be as the women of the land now are; and as you
elevate and ennoble woman, in so much, in a greater ratio, will
our sons be better fitted for the great duties and
responsibilities of the future. No stream shall rise higher than
its fountain.

Sir, I recognize the fact that I have no right at this time to
trespass on the business and indulgence of the House to argue
the momentous question involved in this memorial, but I present
this petition of 35,000 women of America, from almost every State
in the Union. From every class and condition of life, from the
highest and most refined, and from the humblest and most lowly,
all are represented here, all asking that their claim to what
they conceive to be their greatest right, and which we claim to
be the inalienable right of every male citizen shall be granted
to them.

The unanimity with which they come here; the fact that without
organization, almost as a matter of spontaneity, 35,000 names
should have been gathered and sent to this Capitol to a
committee, whose voluntary duty it was made to receive them; the
fact that other names are now coming in at the rate of some 500 a
day; that from California 10,000 more are on the way, all speak
to the Representatives of the people in accents that can not be
misunderstood, that here is a great and necessary reform which
calls for the fullest consideration and the promptest action of
the Congress of the United States.

They are not to be told that this is an innovation, that this is
a new thing. Division of property between the husband and the
wife was a greater innovation upon the feudal law, which is the
foundation of our law as regards women, and a very much greater
innovation than this will be. That in the parent State from which
we come women have had the right to act in public affairs; from
the fact that in that parent State a woman is at the head of
public affairs, seems to point to us that women may safely be
trusted with the right to vote.

I have desired to say this much, in presenting this petition, in
order that it may be brought to the notice of the House and the
country; that it may take the same place in the consideration of
the people that in a not very far day in the past anti-slavery
petitions took, which founded the great party which now has
control of the Government of this country. There was a great
reform, beginning in the little, urged on by petitions, not so
numerous in its early days, and hardly so numerous in its later
days, as this, scarcely arriving to the dignity of numbers of
applicants which characterizes the petition which I now present;
and although, when a great moneyed interest was at stake, it took
years to bring that freedom which those petitions asked for, yet
let me assure the House of Representatives that in my judgment,
much sooner, and as certainly as the sun rolls around in its
course a few more times, just so sure will the right asked for in
this petition be accorded to the women citizens of the United
States.

I ask that this petition, which I propose simply to show to the
House in its large volume (unrolling the petition), may be
referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, to whom this subject
has already been referred.

Mr. ELDRIDGE.--I ask that the petition be read.

The SPEAKER.--With the names?

Mr. ELDRIDGE.--Certainly.

The SPEAKER.--That would require unanimous consent.

Mr. BUTLER, of Massachusetts.--I pray that may not be done,
because I promised the Committee on Appropriations not to take
much time. I ask that the petition simply be read.

The Clerk read as follows:

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
States in Congress assembled:_

The undersigned, citizens of the United States, pray your
honorable bodies that in any proposed amendment to the
Constitution which may come before you in regard to suffrage
in the District of Columbia or any Territory, the right of
voting may be given to women on the same terms as to men.

The petition was then referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

IN THE HOUSE, JANUARY 29, 1872.--MR. PARKER, of Missouri,
introduced a bill (H. R. No. 1277) to allow women to vote and
hold office in the Territories of the United States; which was
read a first and second time, referred to the Committee on the
Judiciary, and ordered to be printed.

IN UNITED STATES SENATE ON JANUARY 29, 1872.--THE VICE-PRESIDENT
said:--The Chair has been requested to present the protest of
ladies of the county of Munroe, Indiana, signed by Mrs. Morton C.
Hunter, Mrs. A. Y. Moore, and several hundred other ladies,
remonstrating against an extension of the right of suffrage to
women, "because the Holy Scripture inculcates a different and for
us a higher sphere, apart from public life; because as women we
find a full measure of duties, cares, and responsibilities
devolving upon us, and we are therefore unwilling to bear other
and heavier burdens, and those unsuited to our physical
organization; because we hold that an extension of suffrage would
be adverse to the interests of the working women of the country,
with whom we heartily sympathize: because these changes must
introduce a fruitful element of discord in the existing marriage
relation, which would tend to the infinite detriment of children,
and increase the already alarming prevalence of divorce through
the land; because no general law affecting the condition of all
women should be framed to meet exceptional discontent." This
memorial will be referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

The National Woman Suffrage Association held its May Anniversary of
1872 in New York, at Steinway Hall. As can be seen by the call,[149]
the intention was to form a political party, but the delegates, after
some discussion, decided that nominees without electors were
incongruous. As usual a large number of States were represented by
delegates, California sending Laura de Force Gordon, and Oregon,
Abigail Scott Duniway. This convention was chiefly remarkable as being
the first at which the presidency changed hands--Miss Anthony, instead
of Mrs. Stanton, being elected to fill the position of chief officer.

A delegation, consisting of Mrs. Hooker, Mrs. De Force Gordon, and
Miss Anthony, was sent by the National Woman Suffrage Association to
the Presidential Conventions held by the Liberal Republicans at
Cincinnati, the Democrats at Baltimore, and the Republicans at
Philadelphia. The fruit of all the earnest labor of this delegation
was a splinter in the Republican platform. This, however, was
something to be grateful for, as it was the first mention of woman in
the platform of either of the great political parties during our
National existence. On the strength of this plank the following
address was issued:

GRANT AND WILSON--APPEAL TO THE WOMEN OF AMERICA FROM THE
NATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION.

Women of the United States, the hour for political action has
come. For the first time in the history of our country woman has
been recognized in the platform of a large and dominant party.
Philadelphia has spoken and woman is no longer ignored. She is
now officially recognized as a part of the body politic. The
fourteenth plank of its platform declares:

The Republican party mindful of its obligations to the loyal
women of America expresses gratification that wider avenues
of employment have been open to women, and it farther
declares that her demands for additional rights should be
treated with respectful consideration.

We are told that this plank does not say much, that in fact it is
only a "splinter;" and our "liberal" friends warn us not to rely
upon it as a promise of the ballot to woman.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.