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G. ROSS.


WASHINGTON, Jan 19.

Mrs. ELIZABETH CADY STANTON--MADAM: Your favor of the 18th instant,
inviting me to address the convention now in session in this city for
the promotion of the cause of female suffrage, has been received. I
regret that my official duties will not allow me the time to comply
with this request; but I assure you, and the ladies with whom you are
associated, that I am heartily in sympathy with the efforts you are
making for the success of the cause which you especially have so long
and so ably advocated. I beg further to say that the bestowal of the
right of equal political suffrage upon the women of this republic can
not, in my judgment, be much longer withheld, and that whatever
influence I have shall be exerted, at every proper opportunity, to
hasten the consummation for which you are laboring. I have the honor
to be, very truly, yours,

MATT. H. CARPENTER.

[131] Rev. Olympia Brown, Connecticut; E. H. Heywood and Jennie
Collins, Massachusetts; M. Adele Hazlitt, Michigan; Mrs. Francis Minor
and Phoebe Couzins, Missouri; Hon. Henry B. Stanton; Judge Barlow,
Canastota; Josephine S. Griffing, Rev. Phebe A. Hanaford, Lizzie M.
Boynton, Maud D. Molson, Susan B. Anthony, Gen. E. M. Lee, Act Gov.
Wyoming; Hon. A. G. Riddle, Washington; Hon. Jas. W. Stillman, Rhode
Island; Col. R. G. Ingersoll, Illinois; Hon. J. M. Scovill, New
Jersey; Dr. James C. Jackson, New York; Mrs. Louisa H. Dent, New York;
Lillie Peckham, Wisconsin; Mrs. M. E. J. Gage, New York; Mrs. Dr. S.
Hathaway, Boston; and S. D. Dillaye, Syracuse.

[132] The Fifth Avenue Conference proposition was presented to the
members of the National Association, duly discussed, and so far as one
of the parties could do, accepted; that is, the National Society
pledged itself to be merged into a Union Association, provided the
American would make the same surrender at its first Anniversary. But
as this overture for peace was rejected, the mission of the Union
Society ended, leaving the National free to reassert itself and go
forward with its catholic platform and persistent demands for
"National protection for United States citizens," while the American
devoted itself primarily to State legislation.

[133] WOMAN SUFFRAGE CELEBRATION.--The twentieth anniversary of the
inauguration of the woman suffrage movement in this country, will be
celebrated in Apollo Hall, in the city of New York, on the 19th and
20th of October, 1870. The movement in England, as in America, may be
dated from the first National Convention, held at Worcester, Mass.,
October, 1850. The July following that convention, a favorable
criticism of its proceedings and an able digest of the whole question
appeared in the _Westminster Review_, written by Mrs. John Stuart
Mill, which awakened attention in both hemispheres. In the call for
that convention, the following subjects for discussion were presented:
Woman's right to _education_, literary, scientific and artistic; her
_avocations_, industrial, commercial and professional; her
_interests_, pecuniary, civil and political: in a word, _her rights_
as an individual, and her _functions_ as a citizen. It is hoped that
the Old and the New World will both be largely represented by the
earlier advocates of this reform who will bring with them reports of
progress and plans for future action. An extensive foreign
correspondence will also add interest to the meetings. We specially
invite the presence of those just awakening to an interest in this
great movement, that from a knowledge of the past they may draw fresh
inspiration for the work of the future and fraternize with a
generation now rapidly passing away. As those who inaugurated a
reform, so momentous and far reaching in its consequences, should hold
themselves above all party considerations and personal antagonisms,
and as this gathering is to be in no way connected with either of our
leading woman suffrage organizations, we hope that the friends of real
progress everywhere will come together and unitedly celebrate this
Twentieth Anniversary of a great National Movement for Freedom.

Committee of Arrangements.--Lucretia Mott, Sarah Pugh, Elizabeth C.
Stanton, Ernestine L. Rose, Samuel J. May, Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols. On
behalf of the Committee,

PAULINA W. DAVIS, Chairman.

[134] In 1843, John Neal, of Portland, Maine, gave a lecture in New
York which roused considerable discussion; it was replied to by Mrs.
Eliza W. Farnham, with all the objections which have ever been urged,
and far more ably than by any of the later objectors. Mrs. Farnham
lived long enough to retrace her ground and accept the highest truth.
"Woman and her Era" fully refutes her early objections. Mr. Neal's
lecture, published in _The Brother Jonathan_, was extensively copied,
and as it reviewed some of the laws relating to woman and her
property, it had a wide, silent influence, preparing the way for
action. It was a scathing satire, and men felt the rebuke.

In this conflict for principle, the names of Wm. L. Garrison, Wendell
Phillips, Edmund Quincy, Oliver Johnson, Parker Pillsbury, S. S.
Foster, William Henry Channing, Samuel J. May, Charles Burleigh, James
Mott, Frederick Douglass, Edmund M. Davis, and Robert Purvis, stand
out conspicuously, and will so be remembered in all the future.

[135] _Resolved_, That at the close of over twenty years of persistent
agitation, petitioning, State Legislatures and Congress for the right
of suffrage, we, who inaugurated this reform, now demand the immediate
adoption of a XVI. Amendment to the Federal Constitution, that shall
prohibit any State from disfranchising its citizens on the ground of
sex; and whatever national party does this act of justice, fastens the
keystone in the arch of the Republic.

_Resolved_, That as neither free trade, finance, prohibition, capital
and labor, nor any other political question, can be so vital to the
existence of the Republic as the enfranchisement of women, it is
clearly our duty to aid and support the great National party that
shall first inscribe woman suffrage on its banner.

_Resolved_, That our thanks are due to the Democratic party of Utah
and Wyoming for securing to woman her right of suffrage in those
Territories.

_Resolved_, That the Democratic party of Kansas, in declaring, at its
recent convention at Topeka, the enfranchisement of women in its
judgment a most reasonable and timely enterprise, no longer to be
justly postponed, is entitled to the hearty support of the friends of
our cause in that State.

_Resolved_, That the American Equal Rights Association, in sending
Susan B. Anthony to the National Democratic Convention in 1868, and
the Massachusetts Suffrage Association, in sending Mary A. Livermore
to the Republican State Convention in 1870, have inaugurated the right
political action, which should be followed in the National and State
Conventions throughout the country.

_Resolved_, That we rejoice in the fact that the Republican
Legislatures of Iowa and other Western States have submitted to the
people the proposition to strike the word "male" from their
Constitutions.

_Resolved_, That it is as disastrous to human progress to teach women
to bow down to the authority of man, as divinely inspired, as it is to
teach man to bow down to the authority of Kings and Popes, as divinely
ordained, for in both cases we violate the fundamental idea on which a
Republican government and the Protestant religion are based--the right
of individual judgment.

_Whereas_, The accident of sex no more involves the capacity to govern
a family than does the accident of Papal election or royal birth the
capacity to govern a dominion or a kingdom; therefore,

_Resolved_, That the doctrine of woman's subjection, enforced from the
text, "Wives, submit yourselves unto your husbands," should be thrown
aside, with the exploded theories of kingcraft and slavery, embodied
in the injunction, "Honor the king," and "Servants, obey your
masters."

_Resolved_, That as the gravest responsibilities of social life must
ever rest on the mother of the race, therefore law, religion, and
public sentiment, instead of degrading her as the subject of man,
should unitedly declare and maintain her sole and supreme sovereignty
over her own person."

[136] Married afterwards to Père Hyacinth.

[137] Chief among the guests were Mrs. Margaret Lucas, of Scotland,
sister of John and Jacob Bright; Mrs. Governor Jewell, of Conn.; Mrs.
Elmes, of Birmingham; Mrs. Caroline Stratton, and Miss Sarah Pugh, of
Philadelphia; Lucretia Mott, Abby H. Price, Adelle Hazlett, Olympia
Brown, Mrs. Davis, Mrs. Lucas, Mrs. Stanton, Mrs. Gage, and Miss
Anthony; Mrs. Godbie, wife of one of the leading reform advocates of
Utah; Mrs. Denman, of Quincy, Ill.; Mrs. Laura Curtis Bullard, and Dr.
Clemence Lozier.

Among the gentlemen present were Alexander Delmar, Rev. Henry Powers,
Mr. Lewis, of the _National Intelligencer_, Col. Hastings, Theodore
Tilton, Oliver Johnson, Prof. Wilcox, and Mr. Packard, of the Business
College, and others.

[138] CALL FOR A NATIONAL SUFFRAGE CONVENTION AT WASHINGTON.--We, the
undersigned, desiring to secure a full discussion of the question of
the enfranchisement of women during the present session of Congress,
with a view to the speedy passage of a XVI. Amendment to the Federal
Constitution, invite all men and women desiring this change in the
Constitution to meet us in convention for that purpose in the city of
Washington on the 11th and 12th of January. Eminent speakers will be
present from all parts of the country, including several members of
Congress, and plans of work will be presented and discussed. We
earnestly urge you, dear friends, to come together at this time in a
spirit of unselfishness and of hard work, and let us take one another
by the hand and move onward as never before.

PAULINA W. DAVIS, JOSEPHINE S. GRIFFING, ISABELLA B. HOOKER.

[139] Mrs.



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