A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
DAVIS, JOSEPHINE S. GRIFFING, ISABELLA B. HOOKER.

[139] Mrs. Esther Morris, a large fine-looking woman, administered
justice in that Territory for nearly two years, and none of her
decisions were ever questioned.

[140] The hearing took place in the committee room, which was crowded
with a goodly assemblage of men and women. Judge Bingham, of Ohio, was
chairman, Gen. B. F. Butler, of Mass., was prominent in favor of the
cause. Messrs. Eldridge, B. C. Cook, I. A. Peters, Ulysses Morcur, Wm.
Loughridge, Michael Kerr, S. W. Kellogg, and G. W. Hitchcock formed
the rest of the committee. The claimants for woman suffrage were
represented by Mrs. V. C. Woodhull and Mrs. L. D. Blake, New York;
Mrs. I. B Hooker, Rev. O. Brown, Conn.; Mrs. P. W. Davis, Miss K.
Stanton, Rhode Island; Mrs. J. Griffing, and Mrs. Lockwood, D. C.; and
Miss Susan B. Anthony. The proceedings were opened by the reading of
her memorial by Mrs. Woodhull. It was the first time the lady had ever
appeared in public, and her voice trembled slightly with emotion which
only made the reading the more effective. She claimed not a XVI.
amendment; but that under the XIV. and XV. Amendments, women have
already the right to vote, and prayed Congress merely to pass a
declaratory resolution to that effect.--The Washington _Republican._

[141] _Yeas_--Messrs. Allison, Arnell, Asper, Atwood, Banks, Barry,
Buck, Buffinton, Burdett, Churchill, Amasa Cobb, Clinton L. Cobb,
Coburn, Cullom, Darrall, Joseph Dixon, Ela, Farnsworth, Finkelnburg,
Hamilton, Harris, Hawkins, Hoar, Alexander H. Jones, Julian, Kelley,
Lawrence, Long, Loughridge, Maynard, Milnes, William Moore, Morey,
Daniel J. Morrell, Negley, Orth, Packard, Paine, Pierce, Platt,
Pomeroy, Porter, Prosser, Sargent, Scofield, Shanks, William J. Smith,
Stevenson, Stoughton, Strickland, Twichell, Cadwallader C. Washburn,
Willard, John T. Wilson, and Wolf.

[142] Among the speakers were Isabella Beecher Hooker, Paulina Wright
Davis, Minnie Swayze, Mrs. Dr. Hallock, Josephine S. Griffing,
Victoria C. Woodhull, Anna Middlebrook, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Susan B.
Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott.

[143] _An Appeal to the Women of the United States by the National
Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee, Washington, D. C._:

DEAR FRIENDS:--The question of your rights as citizens of the United
States, and of the grave responsibilities which a recognition of those
rights will involve, is becoming the great question of the day in this
country, and is the culmination of the great question which has been
struggling through the ages for solution, that of the highest freedom
and largest personal responsibility of the individual under such
necessary and wholesome restraints as are required by the welfare of
society. As you shall meet and act upon this question, so shall these
great questions of freedom and responsibility sweep on, or be
retarded, in their course.

This is pre-eminently the birthday of womanhood. The material has long
held in bondage the spiritual; henceforth the two, the material
refined by the spiritual, the spiritual energized by the material, are
to walk hand in hand for the moral regeneration of mankind. Mothers,
for the first time in history, are able to assert, not only their
inherent first right to the children they have borne, but their right
to be a protective and purifying power in the political society into
which those children are to enter. To fulfill, therefore, their whole
duty of motherhood, to satisfy their whole capacity in that divine
relation, they are called of God to participate with man in all the
responsibilities of human life, and to share with him every work of
brain and heart, refusing only those physical labors that are
inconsistent with the exalted duties and privileges of maternity, and
requiring these of men as the equivalent of those heavy yet necessary
burdens which women alone can bear.

Under the Constitution of the United States justly interpreted, you
were entitled to participate in the government of the country, in the
same manner as you were held to allegiance and subject to penalty. But
in the slow development of the great principles of freedom, you, and
all, have failed both to recognize and appreciate this right; but
to-day, when the rights and responsibilities of women are attracting
the attention of thoughtful minds throughout the whole civilized
world, this constitutional right, so long unobserved and unvalued, is
becoming one of prime importance, and calls upon all women who love
their children and their country to accept and rejoice in it.
Thousands of years ago God uttered this mingled command and promise,
"Honor thy father and thy mother, that thy days may be long upon the
land which the Lord thy God giveth thee." May we not hope that in the
general recognition of this right and this duty of woman to
participate in government, our beloved country may find her days long
and prosperous in this beautiful land which the Lord hath given her.

To the women of this country who are willing to unite with us in
securing the full recognition of our rights, and to accept the duties
and responsibilities of a full citizenship, we offer for signature the
following Declaration and Pledge, in the firm belief that our
children's children will with fond veneration recognize in this act
our devotion to the great doctrines of liberty in their new and wider
and more spiritual application, even as we regard with reverence the
prophetic utterances of the fathers of the Republic in their
Declaration of Independence:


DECLARATION AND PLEDGE OF THE WOMEN OF THE UNITED STATES CONCERNING
THEIR RIGHT TO AND THEIR USE OF THE ELECTIVE FRANCHISE.

We, the undersigned, believing that the sacred rights and privileges
of citizenship in this Republic were guaranteed to us by the original
Constitution, and that these rights are confirmed and more clearly
established by the XIV. and XV. Amendments, so that we can no longer
refuse the solemn responsibilities thereof, do hereby pledge ourselves
to accept the duties of the franchise in our several States, so soon
as all legal restrictions are removed. And believing that character is
the best safeguard of national liberty, we pledge ourselves to make
the personal purity and integrity of candidates for public office the
first test of fitness. And lastly, believing in God, as the Supreme
Author of the American Declaration of Independence, we pledge
ourselves in the spirit of that memorable Act, to work hand in hand
with our fathers, husbands, and sons, for the maintenance of those
equal rights on which our Republic was originally founded, to the end
that it may have, what is declared to be the first condition of just
government, the consent of the governed.

You have no new issue to make, no new grievances to set forth. You are
taxed without representation, tried by a jury not of your peers,
condemned and punished by judges and officers not of your choice,
bound by laws you have had no voice in making, many of which are
specially burdensome upon you as women; in short, your rights to life,
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are daily infringed, simply
because you have heretofore been denied the use of the ballot, the one
weapon of protection and defense under a republican form of
government. Fortunately, however, you are not compelled to resort to
force in order to secure the rights of a complete citizenship. These
are provided for by the original Constitution, and by the recent
amendments you are recognized as citizens of the United States, whose
rights, including the fundamental right to vote, may not be denied or
abridged by the United States, nor by any State. The obligation is
thus laid upon you to accept or reject the duties of citizenship, and
to your own consciences and your God you must answer, if the future
legislation of this country shall fall short of the demands of justice
and equality.

The participation of woman in political affairs is not an untried
experiment. Woman suffrage has within a few years been fully
established in Sweden and Austria, and to a certain extent in Russia.
In Great Britain women are now voting equally with men for all public
officers except members of Parliament, and while no desire is
expressed in any quarter that the suffrage already given should be
withdrawn or restricted, over 126,000 names have been signed to
petitions for its extension to parliamentary elections, and Jacob
Bright, the leader of the movement in Parliament, and brother of the
well known John Bright, says that no well-informed person entertains
any doubt that a bill for such extension will soon pass.

In this country, which stands so specially on equal representation, it
is hardly possible that the same equal suffrage would not be
established by law, if the matter were to be left merely to the
progress of public sentiment and the ordinary course of legislation.
But as we confidently believe, and as we have before stated, the right
already exists in our National Constitution, and especially under the
recent amendments. The interpretation of the Constitution which we
maintain, we can not doubt, will be ultimately adopted by the courts,
although, as the assertion of our right encounters a deep and
prevailing prejudice, and judges are proverbially cautious and
conservative, we must expect to encounter some adverse decisions. In
the meantime it is of the highest importance that in every possible
way we inform the public mind and educate public opinion on the whole
subject of equal rights under a republican government, and that we
manifest our desire for and willingness to accept all the rights and
responsibilities of citizenship, by asserting our right to be
registered as voters and to vote at the Congressional elections. The
original Constitution provides in express terms that the
representatives in Congress shall be elected "by the people of the
several States," with no restrictions whatever as to the application
of that term. This right, thus clearly granted to all the people, is
confirmed and placed beyond reasonable question by the XIV.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.