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It was in bad taste for the North to
denounce the South, and it was in particularly bad taste for
woman suffragists who are clamoring for representation and for
the ballot, to call for its denial to any part of the nation.

Col. R. J. Hinton, of Washington, also denounced the resolution,
saying that it violated one of the fundamental principles of the
woman suffrage platform, which is that the limitation of suffrage
is a gross outrage. Miss Anthony very pertinently said: "All the
trouble on this platform is that we haven't the right to vote. If
we had it we shouldn't complain of anybody else voting." The
resolution was voted down by a large majority.

At the evening session the Hall was literally packed. Mrs.
Dundore of Baltimore, and Miss Taintor of California were the
first speakers. Then the fascinating St. Louis lawyer, Miss
Phoebe Couzins, whose logic is as sound as her wit is sparkling,
was introduced, and delivered an address on "Woman as Lawyer," a
subject which, in most hands, would have put the audience to
sleep, but in hers, kept them wide awake with laughter and
applause at her brilliant sallies. At the conclusion of her
speech the Hutchinsons sang a stirring song, and then Miss
Anthony introduced the colored member of Congress from South
Carolina, Mr. A. J. Ransier, who spoke unqualifiedly in favor of
woman suffrage. Mr. Ransier is president of a woman suffrage
association in South Carolina. He was a little inclined to repeat
himself, and after having returned several times to the statement
that he had "no speech to make," an old lady in the audience
popped up on the bench and said: "Well, if you haven't got a
speech to make, I have," and immediately started out at the rate
of twenty-five knots an hour, utterly oblivious of the rights of
Mr. Ransier, who already had the floor, and who was very politely
waiting for her to subside. Miss Anthony, after patiently waiting
some time, said she should have to call the lady to order, but
she paid no attention to the call. After a while the ludicrous
situation set the audience to smiling audibly, and the louder
they smiled, and the greater the excitement grew, the swifter
flew the old lady's tongue. After consultation among the managers
of the meeting, it was finally decided to send a policeman to
quietly remove this garrulous disturber of the peace. A policeman
was accordingly summoned, but his entreaties had no effect on the
old lady, who stoutly maintained her perch, and declared she
would not go with him. Then Miss Couzins descended from the
platform, and accomplished with her winning ways what the
policeman couldn't. She calmed the troubled waters--got the old
lady to sit down by her side and keep the peace the rest of the
evening. Who wouldn't maintain the peace when entreated from such
a quarter? Mr. Ransier was enabled to finish his speech--a really
good one--Miss Anthony remarking at its close that she wished she
could have had him for her judge instead of Mr. Hunt. She then
made a wide awake and telling speech, which, if this letter were
not already too long, I should like to give. At its close she
introduced Mrs. Guthrie, a daughter of Frances Wright, that woman
of rare mind and original thought, who came from England to this
country some forty or more years ago; and who, with Robert Owen
and some others, tried to start a colony on the community system.
To the surprise of all, Mrs. Guthrie declared herself opposed to
woman suffrage. At the close of her remarks the Doxology was
sung, and the convention adjourned _sine die_.

F. E. B.

The correspondent of the Boston _Commonwealth_, after giving a
pen-picture of the ladies on the platform, said:

The Convention laid out some very practical work for the
consideration and action of Congress. It circulated a petition
and obtained six hundred names of citizens, both men and women of
the District, asking that the word male be stricken from the
organic act of the District government. This was presented by Mr.
Dawes, for Mr. Butler, to the House, and referred to the
Judiciary Committee, before the members of which the ladies
to-day had a hearing. Their case was presented and briefly argued
by Mr. Miller, a lawyer of some promise and reputation, a
resident of the District. Mrs. Sarah Spencer, of Washington,
addressed the Committee on the legal points involved. She said
that the petitioners did not conceal the point that the XIV.
Amendment did not give them the right to vote, but since Congress
had referred them to the State legislatures, they came now to ask
that the women of the District be allowed to vote. Mrs. Spencer
answered the argument so often made, that all of the bad women
would vote and the good ones would stay at home. She said in
reply to this oft-repeated objection, that she had found in
talking with that class they made the same objection to woman
suffrage that the fashionable women make, and were quite as
averse to its adoption. Again, she said statistics show the
lamentable fact that only one-fifth of this class live to be
eighteen years of age; their average length of life being only
five years, no real danger was to be apprehended from giving
woman the ballot. Mrs. Spencer spoke with feeling, and evidently
made a favorable impression upon the Committee. Mrs. Lockwood
made a few pertinent remarks. As this lady has lately been
admitted to the bar in this city, she can speak from experience
upon many points of law and fact. Miss Burr, of Hartford, asked
simply for full justice, eschewing law and legal lore upon the
subject, willing to be numbered with Plato and John Stuart Mill
on this question. Miss Couzins appealed to the heart; as so many
knock-down arguments had been hurled at their heads she preferred
to attack the heart. She said she felt great delicacy in
appearing before so much learning and wisdom, but the veteran
commander-in-chief of the forces, Miss Anthony, had ordered her
to the front, and when she told her she must spike a gun, like a
good soldier, although a raw recruit, she obeyed. Miss Anthony
introduced the speakers, and closed the meeting with a few
well-chosen words.

It was a picture worthy the brush of an old master. Eleven
lawyers seated around a table, with Benjamin F. Butler at the
head, listening to women pleading for the right of
self-government. Their faces, as they listened, every one of them
with respectful attention, was a study worthy the most thoughtful
student of human nature. Some of them listened, no doubt, for the
first time to an argument in favor of this innovation, but the
most unbelieving were evidently impressed with the earnestness
and strong feeling displayed in the advocacy of the cause. The
room was well filled with spectators, drawn together, some from
sympathy, others from idle curiosity, but all were compelled to
respectful consideration by the ease, dignity, and ability
displayed by the ladies in presenting their cause. Only upon the
faces of a few newspaper reporters just emerging from adolescence
into manhood, rested the traditional sneer at the strong-minded;
and when the hour for adjournment arrived, one of the members of
the Committee remarked he regretted that a longer time could not
have been given to the ladies. To those who think the cause of
woman suffrage has gone backwards, we commend the proceedings of
this meeting of the Judiciary Committee.

In addition to the petition for suffrage in the District, another
one has also been drawn, which Mr. Loughridge, of Iowa, will
present at an early day, asking for the remission of the fine
imposed upon Miss Anthony for voting at the last Presidential
election.

By the way, an incident showing the singular independence of Gen.
Grant happened on Saturday. When the President was taking his
afternoon stroll down Pennsylvania Avenue, he met Miss Anthony
and Miss Couzins. Instead of bowing and passing on, as most any
one of the high dignitaries occupying official position would
have done, he stopped, shook hands, and entered into conversation
with them. The chief justiceship being the absorbing subject of
interest, Miss Couzins suggested the name of Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, since he seemed to have so much trouble in getting a man
to suit. The President pleasantly replied he would not subject
any woman to the ordeal of such an examination as she would be
subjected to over Sunday, if the announcement of the nomination
to that office were made. Miss Anthony said if he would only
nominate Henry R. Selden, her counsel, the man who had brains and
courage enough to defend her for voting for him, the country
would at once recognize it as the best possible thing that could
be done. The group, as they stood there on the avenue, the
President of the United States with a pleased and animated face,
and Miss Anthony, whom everybody knows and respects, even
although they don't believe in suffrage for women, and the
strikingly handsome young lawyer from St. Louis, in animated
conversation over the Chief Justiceship, was the object of
attraction of all passing by. If some fortunate photographer
could have taken the picture his fortune would have been secured
beyond doubt.

The May Anniversary[158] of 1874 was held in Irving Hall, with the
usual list of speakers.[159] The attendance was large throughout.
Martha C.



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