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Let our Twenty-fifth Anniversary be one of power;
our reform is everywhere advancing, let us redouble our energies and
our courage.

MATILDA JOSLYN GAGE, _Ch'n Ex. Com._ SUSAN B. ANTHONY, _Pres._

[153] Mrs. Elizabeth Avery Meriwether, Tennessee; Isabella Beecher
Hooker, Connecticut; Francis Miller, Washington, D. C.; Sarah R. L.
Williams, Toledo, Ohio; Mrs. C. M. Palmer, California; Carrie S.
Burnham, Pennsylvania; Ellen C. Sargent, Washington; Le Grand Marvin,
Buffalo, N. Y.; Carl Doerflinger, Wisconsin; Emily Pitts Stevens,
editor of the _Pioneer_, San Francisco, Cal.; A. Jane Duniway, editor
of the _New Northwest_, Portland, Oregon.

[154] WHEREAS, This being the twenty-fifth anniversary of the first
combined effort of women for the recognition of their civil and
political rights; and,

WHEREAS, The demands first publicly promulgated in an obscure village
in the State of New York have now spread over the world; therefore,

_Resolved_, That while we congratulate women on the progress of this
reform during a quarter of a century, we urge them not to grow
discouraged or faint-hearted when obstacles arise in their attack upon
hoary wrongs. We remind them that the race is not to the swift, nor
the battle to the strong, and that the nearer we come to victory the
stronger will be the effort against us. But our cause is one of
eternal justice, and must ultimately prevail.

_Resolved_, That Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton will
evermore be held in grateful remembrance as the pioneers in this
grandest reform of the age; that as the wrongs they attacked were
broader and deeper than any other, so as time passes they will be
revered as foremost among the benefactors of the race, and that we
also hold sacred the memory of their co-laborers in the Convention of
1848.

WHEREAS, The underlying principle of our Government is equality of
political rights, therefore,

_Resolved_, That in the prosecution and trial of Susan B. Anthony, a
citizen of the United State, for having cast a ballot at the last
election, the Government of the United States declares it is a crime
to vote, thus attempting to undermine the very foundation of the
Republic.

_Resolved_, That as in this trial Susan B. Anthony represents one-half
of the people, the whole power of the United States is arrayed against
the women of the nation--against law-abiding, tax-paying women
citizens.

_Resolved_, That the trial of Susan B. Anthony, though ostensibly
involving the political status of woman alone, in reality questions
the right of every man to share in the Government; that it is not
Susan B. Anthony, or the women of the Republic who alone are on trial
to-day, but it is the Government of the United States, and that as the
decision is rendered for or against the political rights of
citizenship, so will the men of America find themselves free or
enslaved.

_Resolved_, That the decisions of the courts in the case of Mrs.
Bradwell, of Illinois, Mrs. Spencer and Mrs. Webster, of Washington;
Mrs. Minor, of St. Louis; Miss Burnham, of Philadelphia, and others,
are warnings to the people that their liberties are in danger.

_Resolved_, That it is because women are not voters, and, therefore,
have no recognized political power, that the members of the
Forty-second Congress, while raising their own salaries from $5,000 to
$7,500, dared to reject an amendment to the same bill, which proposed
to raise the salaries of the women employés of the Government from
$900 to $1,200.

_Resolved_, That in the coming Centennial of our nation's birth it is
mockery to ask woman to lend a helping hand without some pledge to
right her wrongs; what cause has she for rejoicing unless the century
shall round out with her enfranchisement, and the old liberty bell
ring in equality for all.

_Resolved_, That the report of the Judiciary Committee of the Assembly
of the State of New York in regard to a property suffrage
qualification for women, is one of the signs of awakened thought
toward our reform.

_Resolved_, That the rapid advance of Woman's Rights in foreign
countries is a subject of gratulation, and as a matter of special
cheer we call particular attention to the grand international Woman's
Rights Congress, under the control of the liberals of Europe, to be
held in Paris during the present year.

WHEREAS, The National Woman Suffrage Association has been requested to
send delegates to the International Woman's Rights Congress to be held
in Paris in October next; therefore,

_Resolved_, That this Association empower Ernestine L. Rose, Paulina
Wright Davis, Mathilde F. Wendt, Jane Graham Jones, and Elizabeth
Phelps Pearsall, to represent our woman suffrage movement in that
congress.

[155] Mrs. Nettie C. Tabor, Cal.; Frances Ellen Burr, Hartford, Conn.;
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Phelps, N. Y.; Mrs. E. Langdon, N. Y.; Jane B.
Archibald, D. C.; Miss Jennie V. Jewell, D. C.; Mrs. Adeliah Gardiner,
Baltimore; Kate C. Harris, Baltimore; Miss Laura Ewing, Baltimore;
Phoebe W. Couzins; Edward M. Davis, Philadelphia; Matilda Joslyn Gage,
Fayetteville, N. Y.; Lillie Devereux Blake, New York City; Ruth C.
Dennison, D. C.; Sara Andrews Spencer, D. C.; Dr. Clemence S. Lozier,
New York City; Belva A. Lockwood, Virginia L. Vaughn, James K. Wilcox,
and the Hutchinson Family.

[156] Letters were received from Paulina Wright Davis, Providence, R.
I.; Virginia L. Minor, St. Louis, Mo.; Hon. E. G. Lapham, Canandaigua,
N. Y.; Vice-Pres. Henry Wilson, Natick, Mass.; John Van Vhoris,
Rochester, N. Y.; Dr. James C. Jackson, Dansville, N. Y.; Hon. Henry
R. Selden, Rochester, N. Y.; Hon. John A. Kasson, Iowa; Thomas
Wentworth Higginson, Newport, R. I.; Ernestine L. Rose, London,
England; Dr. Laura Ross Wolcott, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Carrie S.
Burnham, Philadelphia, Pa.; Lewia C. Smith, Rochester, N. Y.; Asenath
Coolidge, Watertown, N. Y.; Priscilla Holmes Drake, Alabama; Laura De
Force Gordon, California; George F. Downing, Washington, D. C.; The
Free Thinkers Club of Milwaukee; The Radical Democracy of Wisconsin.

[157] _Resolved_, That this convention, representing as it does all
portions of our country, cordially sympathizes with the proposed
efforts of the women of the District of Columbia to secure the
practical enjoyment of their constitutional right to vote, as declared
by the Supreme Court of said District, by the passage of an act of
Congress amending the organic law of the District by striking out the
word "male" from the seventh section of said act; and we earnestly
request our senators and representatives to support a bill providing
for such an amendment by speech and vote.

_Resolved_, That a committee of seven be appointed by the president of
this convention to co-operate with the committee heretofore appointed
by the women of the District of Columbia in their application to
Congress for the passage of an act amendatory of the organic act of
said District, as above indicated.

_Resolved_, That among the important events in our struggle for the
equal rights of woman we place the trial of Miss Susan B. Anthony
before Hon. Ward Hunt, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United
States, at Canandaigua, New York, in June last, on an indictment for
voting as a citizen at the general election in November, 1872; that
the grossly partial course of Judge Hunt on that occasion, his seeming
unacquaintance with the plainest rules of law, and his eagerness for
the conviction of Miss Anthony, stand in marked contrast with the calm
demeanor and clear apprehension of the facts and principles at issue
which she exhibited on the trial, and their conduct respectively in
this memorable contest affords proof that, though it may be possible
that all women have not a constitutional right to be voters, it is
very certain that some men are not fit to be judges.

_Resolved_, That waiving for the present moment the question whether
or not Judge Hunt was correct in his decision concerning the
constitutional right of women to vote for Federal officers,
nevertheless, in the opinion of all sound lawyers and intelligent men,
he committed a great outrage against Miss Anthony by assuming, without
proof, that she voted for a candidate for Congress, and by arbitrarily
refusing to allow the jury to pass upon the question of her innocence,
and by peremptorily commanding them to render a verdict of guilty.
That so plain is this to the minds of those who possess any clear
knowledge of general principles of law, and of the ordinary duties of
a criminal court, that Judge Hunt has shown by his conduct on that
trial that he is too ignorant to fill his high position, or too
arbitrary to be entrusted with its grave responsibilities; and,
therefore, in either case, he ought to be impeached and removed from
the bench.

_Resolved_, That by the death of John Stuart Mill, woman has lost a
wise, brave friend. His great work for the enfranchisement of woman,
and for the elevation of all mankind deserves the public thanks of
this convention.

_Resolved_, That in Hon. John C. Underwood, lately removed from the
bench by death, the women of his district have lost that rarest of
public servants, a judge to whom the disfranchised could confidently
look for justice.

_Resolved_, That by the death of John M. Morris, late editor of the
Washington _Chronicle_, the cause of woman's freedom lost a tried and
valued friend, whose faithfulness and judgment entitled him to the
gratitude of the women of this Nation.

Miss Anthony submitted the following:

_Resolved_, That the thanks of the friends of woman suffrage are due
to the Misses Smith, of Glastonbury, Connecticut, for their patriotic
resistance to the tyranny of taxation without representation, and that
all women tax payers through the country should follow their example.

_Resolved_, That the best means of agitating at the present hour is
for all women to insist on their right of representation by actually
presenting their votes at every election, and for all property-holding
women to refuse to pay another dollar of tax until their right of
representation is recognized.

PETERBORO, January 5, 1874

SUSAN B.



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