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SEVERANCE,
T. W. HIGGINSON, JULIA WARD HOWE,
GEO. H. VIBBERT.

Soon after, the following call was issued:

The undersigned, being convinced of the necessity for an American
Woman Suffrage Association, which shall embody the deliberate
action of the State organizations, and shall carry with it their
united weight, do hereby respectfully invite such organizations
to be represented in a Delegate Convention, to be held at
Cleveland, Ohio, November 24th and 25th, A.D., 1869.

The proposed basis of this Convention is as follows:

The delegates appointed by existing State organizations shall be
admitted, provided their number does not exceed, in each case,
that of the Congressional delegation of the State. Should it fall
short of that number, additional delegates may be admitted from
local organizations, or from no organization whatever, provided
the applicants be actual residents of the States they represent.
But no votes shall be counted in the Convention except of those
actually admitted as delegates. (Signed)

John Neal, Maine; Nathaniel White, Armenia S. White, William
T. Savage, New Hampshire; James Hutchinson, Jr., Vermont;
William Lloyd Garrison, Lydia Maria Child, David Lee Child,
George F. Hoar, Julia Ward Howe, Gilbert Haven, Caroline M.
Severance, James Freeman Clarke, Abby Kelly Foster, Stephen
S. Foster, Frank B. Sanborn, Phebe A. Hanaford,
Massachusetts; Elizabeth B. Chase, T. W. Higginson, Rowland
G. Hazard, Rhode Island; H. M. Rogers, Seth Rogers, Marianna
Stanton, Connecticut; George William Curtis, Lydia Mott,
Henry Ward Beecher, Frances D. Gage, Samuel J. May, Celia
Burleigh, W. H. Burleigh, Aaron M. Powell, Anna C. Field,
Gerrit Smith, E. S. Bunker, New York; Lucy Stone, Henry B.
Blackwell, John Gage, Portia Gage, Antoinette B. Blackwell,
A. J. Davis, Mary F. Davis, New Jersey; Mary Grew,
Pennsylvania; Thomas Garret, Fielder Israel, Delaware;
Hannah M. Tracy Cutler, A. J. Boyer, Margaret V. Longley, J.
J. Belleville, Miriam M. Cole, S. Bolton, Ohio; Amanda Way,
George W. Julian, Laura Giddings Julian, Lizzie M. Boynton,
Indiana; Mary A. Livermore, C. B. Waite, Myra Bradwell,
James B. Bradwell, Sharon Tyndale, J. P. Weston, Robert
Collyer, Joseph Haven, Illinois; Moses Coit Tyler, James A.
B. Stone, Mrs. H. L. Stone, Michigan; Lilie Peckham, Augusta
J. Chapin, Wisconsin; Amelia Bloomer, Iowa; Mrs. S. B.
Stearns, Minnesota; Charles Robinson, Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols,
John Ekin, D.D., J. P. Root, Kansas; Mrs. W. T. Hazard,
Isaac H. Sturgeon, Mrs. Beverly Allen, James E. Yeatman,
Mary E. Beede, J. C. Orrick, Mrs. George D. Hall, Missouri;
Guy W. Wines, Charles J. Woodbury, Tennessee; Mary Atkins
Lynch, Louisiana; Elizabeth C. Wright, Texas; Grace
Greenwood, Dist. Columbia; A. K. Safford, Arizona; J. A.
Brewster, California: Hon. G. C. Jones, Dowagiac, Hon.
William S. Farmer, Eau Claire, Hon. T. W. Ferry, of Grand
Haven; Hon. S. H. Blackman, Paw Paw, Rev. J. Straub,
Lansing, and S. H. Brigham, editor of the Lansing
_Republican_, Michigan; Mrs. Austin Adams, and Edna T.
Snell, of Dubuque, Miss Mattie E. Griffiths, Prof. and Mrs.
Belle Mansfield, Mt. Pleasant, T. M. Mills, Ed. Des Moines
_State Register_, Ex-Gov. and Mrs. B. F. Gue, and Hon. Mr.
and Mrs. Pomeroy, Ft. Dodge, Iowa; Mrs. J. C. Burbank, Mrs.
Smith (State Librarian), Rev. J. Marvin, and Capt. Russell
Blakely, of St. Paul, Mrs. Elliott, of Minneapolis, Mr. and
Mrs. A. Knight, of St. Peter, Minnesota; Rev. H. Eddy,
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Milwaukee,
Wisconsin; Mrs. E. O. G. Willard, of Chicago, Illinois.

The first American Woman Suffrage Convention assembled at Case
Hall, Cleveland, O., on Wednesday morning, November 24th. The
attendance from the city was very large; the vast hall being well
filled, both floor and balcony. The Convention was called to
order by Mrs. Lucy Stone. Twenty-one States were
represented--eighteen by regularly accredited delegates; thus
making it truly National. Great harmony pervaded all the
deliberations of the Committees and the discussions of the
Convention.

On motion of F. B. Sanborn, of Massachusetts, Judge J. B.
Bradwell, of Chicago, was chosen temporary Chairman, and on
motion of Mrs. Lucy Stone, Mrs. Mary F. Davis, of New Jersey, was
elected temporary Secretary. Upon taking the chair, Judge
Bradwell returned his thanks for the honor conferred upon him. It
was unnecessary for him to speak at length in regard to the
object of the meeting; it had been stated in the call read by
Mrs. Stone. He said they were met for the formation of an
American Woman Suffrage Association, which shall be represented
in every State of this great Nation; and not only every State,
but every city, town, and county from the Atlantic to the
Pacific, and from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada. On motion of Mr.
Sanborn a Committee on Credentials[180] was appointed by the
President. All State delegations were requested to report their
names to the Committee, and also to fill any vacancies which
might exist, if persons were present from their respective
States.

Pending the report of the Committee on Credentials, Mrs. Lucy
Stone presented letters from several persons[181] who had been
unable to attend the Convention, but desired to give expression
to their sympathy with its object. In a few preliminary remarks
she expressed the pleasure she felt at the sight of such a large
and intelligent audience at the first session of the Convention,
which many had supposed would be but merely a business meeting.
It was an evidence of the increasing interest which is being felt
upon the subject of woman suffrage. She alluded to the Convention
held in this city sixteen years ago, and was glad to see several
familiar faces which were present on that occasion. Mrs. H. M.
Tracy Cutler, of Cleveland, delivered an eloquent appeal for
women.

Judge Bradwell said that under the laws in some States the right
of woman to a certain degree of citizenship is acknowledged.
Foreign-born women may be naturalized, and even without the
consent of their husbands. In all probability Vermont will soon
confer upon woman the right of suffrage. In that State the women
considerably outnumber the men, and if some of them should move
to the West, they might say, "We voted and were citizens in
Vermont, and, under the XIV. Amendment to the Constitution of the
United States, we claim the right to vote here."

Mrs. C. G. Ames, of California, alluded to a case which occurred
in San Francisco. A woman was informed that she might be
protected through the courtesy of the consul, but that she had no
claim to protection as a citizen of the Government.

The Committee on Credentials presented the names of
delegates[182] who were already present as entitled to seats in
the Convention. Other names were added as they were reported to
the Convention during the session.

There were also in attendance persons from Virginia, Mississippi,
and Nebraska, who conferred with the Chairman of the Committee on
credentials with reference to their admission to the body of
delegates. They were all _bona fide_ residents in the States they
represented, but they seemed so undecided in reference to the
question of woman suffrage, finding it hardly possible to tell
whether they were for it or against it, that it was thought not
best for them to propose themselves as self-constituted
delegates. Near the close of the Convention, those from Nebraska
and Virginia sought the Chairman of the Committee to say that if
another convention were to be held, they could heartily and
conscientiously take seats as delegates; for if they had any
doubts as to the justice and utility of woman suffrage in the
outset, they had been wholly removed by the arguments to which
they had listened. Twenty-one States were thus represented in the
Convention, making it truly National.

On motion of Mr. Blackwell, the President was authorized to
appoint a committee,[183] consisting of one from each State on
the permanent organization of the Convention. Pending the
announcement of the committee, Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, of Boston,
delivered an address to the Convention, replete with the noblest
wisdom and the soundest morality. Her utterance was both
prophetic and hortatory. She cautioned women not to do injustice
to others, while seeking justice for themselves; advised them
that they must prepare for the new responsibilities they coveted;
and that they would better learn to command, by learning well how
to serve. She closed her grand and inspiring address with this
sentence: "Oh! of all the names given to us to warn off the demon
and invoke the angel, let us hold fast to this word--service!"

The Convention reassembled at two o'clock, the hall being filled
in every part. Before proceeding to business, the President
invited to seats upon the platform, Stephen S. Foster, Miss Susan
B. Anthony, Rev. Antoinette Brown Blackwell, Andrew Jackson
Davis, Mrs. Leland, of Wisconsin; Mr. and Mrs. John Gage, of
Vineland, New Jersey, all of whom he designated as faithful
veteran laborers in the good cause. He also invited all officers
of Woman Suffrage Associations, members of the press and the
clergy without distinction of sex or color.

The proceedings were opened with an impressive prayer by Rev.
Antoinette Brown Blackwell, of New Jersey.



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