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After
hearing an account of the sufferings she had undergone for the Union
cause, General Granger determined to bestow upon her a testimonial of
appreciation for her services, and she was accordingly formally
proclaimed a Major of cavalry. The ladies of Nashville, hearing of
this promotion, prepared a costly riding habit trimmed in military
style, with dainty shoulder-straps, etc., and presented the dress to
Miss Cushman.

Dr. Mary Walker gave her services on the field as surgeon, winning an
acknowledged reputation in the Second corps, army of the Potomac, for
professional superiority. She applied for a commission as assistant
surgeon, but was refused by Surgeon-General Hammond because of her
sex. Dr. Walker suffered imprisonment in Castle Thunder, Richmond,
having been taken prisoner.

The special correspondent of the _N. Y. Tribune_, Headquarters Army of
the Potomac, Sept. 15, 1863, said: "She applied to both
Surgeon-Generals Finlay and Hammond for a commission as assistant
surgeon. Her competence was attested and approved, yet as the Army
Regulations did not authorize the employment of women as surgeons, her
petition was denied. A Senator from New York, with an enlightenment
which did him honor, urged her appointment to the Secretary of War,
but without success."

[23] Gilbert Hay, shortly before released from Fort La Fayette.

[24] LEE AT ARLINGTON.--Visitors to this noted place are so frequent
that his appearance attracted no attention. He walked through the
dreary hall, and looked in on the wide, vacant rooms, and passing to
the front, stood for some time gazing out over the beautiful panorama,
with its one great feature, the new dome of the old capitol,
surmounted by a bronze statue of Liberty armed, and with her back to
him, gazing seaward.

From this he passed to the garden, and looked over the line of the
officers' graves that bound its sides, saw the dying flowers and
wilted borders and leaf strewn walks, and continuing after a slight
pause, he stopped on the edge of the field where the sixteen thousand
Union soldiers lie buried in lines, as if they had lain down after a
review to be interred in their places. Some negroes were at work here
raking up the falling leaves, and one old man stopped suddenly and
stared at the visitor as if struck mute with astonishment. He
continued to gaze in this way until the stranger, walking slowly,
regained his horse and rode away, when he dropped his rake and said to
his companions: "Shuah as de Lord, men, dat was ole Massa Lee!"

One hastens to imagine the thoughts and feelings that must have
agitated this fallen chief as he stood thus, like Marius amid the
ruins of Carthage, on the one spot of all others, to realize the fact
of the Lost Cause and its eventful history. About him were the scenes
of his youth, the home of his honored manhood, the scenery that gave
beauty to the peaceful joys of domestic life. They were nearly all the
same, and yet between then and now, came the fierce war, the huge
campaigns and hundred battles loud with the roar of mouthing cannons
and rattling musketry, and stained into history by the blood of
thousands, the smoke of burning houses, the devastation of wide
States, and the desolation of the households, and all in vain. He
stood there, old before his time, the nationality so fiercely
struggled for, unrecognized; the great confederacy a dream, his home a
grave-yard, and the capitol he sought to destroy grown to
twice its size, with the bronze goddess gazing calmly to the
East.--_Correspondence of the Cincinnati Commercial_, 1866.

[25] Peter Waldo, a merchant of Lyon, of the 12th century, was less
the founder of a sect, than the representative and leader of a
wide-spread struggle against the corruptions of the clergy. The church
would have tolerated him, had he not trenched upon ground dangerous to
the hierarchy. But he had the four Gospels translated and (like
Wicklyffe) maintained that laymen had the right to read them to the
people. He exposed thus the ignorance and the immorality of the
clergy, and brought down their wrath upon himself. His opinions were
condemned by a General Council, and he retired to the valleys of the
Cottian Alps. Long persecutions followed, but his disciples could not
be forced to yield their opinions. The protest of the Waldenses
related to practical questions.--_Encyc._

[26] It was almost as thrilling a sight to me to see these earnest
women together at work with their needles, as it was to see the first
colored soldier in the Union blue. He was from Camp Reed, near Boston.
I met him in the church of Rev. Mr. Grimes, and could not have known
before how much such a vision would stir me. It was with great
satisfaction that I took him by the hand and rejoiced with him in the
progress of the Government toward equality.

[27] Mrs. Briggs ("Olivia") writing to the _Sunday Morning Chronicle_
after Mrs. Griffing had departed this life, said in this connection:
"Altogether $166,000 were given by Congress to the helpless who had
been so long held in bondage, and for the great good accomplished, the
sufferers were more indebted to Mrs. Griffing than to all the women of
the country combined, for the larger proportion of the supplies
purchased with this money, was distributed by her own hands."

[28] This would at first thought seem to conflict with the knowledge
of "the North Star" and "Canada," but, as elsewhere, we must draw the
line between the ignorant and the intelligent.

[29] See Appendix.

[30] The impeachment trial of President Johnson

[31] _Forney's Press_, in reporting a meeting at Kennett Square, said:
"Miss Anna E. Dickinson, of Philadelphia, aged seventeen years,
handsome, of an expressive countenance, plainly dressed, and eloquent
beyond her years, made the speech of the occasion. After the listless,
monotonous harangues of the day, the distinct, earnest tones of this
juvenile Joan of Arc were very sweet and charming. During her
discourse, which was frequently interrupted, Miss Dickinson maintained
her presence of mind, and uttered her radical sentiments with
augmented resolution and plainness. Those who did not sympathize with
her remarks, provocative as they were of numerous unmanly
interruptions, were softened by her simplicity and solemnity. 'We are
told,' said she, 'to maintain constitutions because they are
constitutions, and compromises because they are compromises. But what
are compromises, and what is laid down in those constitutions? Eminent
lawyers have said that certain great fundamental ideas of right are
common to the world, and that all laws of man's making which trample
on these ideas, are null and void--wrong to obey; right to disobey.
The Constitution of the United States recognizes human slavery, and
makes the souls of men articles of purchase and of sale.'"

[32] She has always said that that was the best service the Government
could have rendered her, as it forced her to the decision to labor no
longer with her hands for bread, but open some new path for herself.

[33] The highest compliment that the Union men of this city could pay
Miss Anna E. Dickinson, was to invite her to make the closing and most
important speech in this campaign. They were willing to rest their
case upon her efforts. She may go far and speak much; she will have no
more flattering proof of the popular confidence in her eloquence,
tact, and power, than this. Her business being to obtain votes for the
right side, she addressed herself to that end with singular
adaptation. But when we add to this lawyerlike comprehension of the
necessities of the case, her earnestness, enthusiasm, and personal
magnetism, we account for the effect she produced on that vast
audience Saturday night.

Allyn Hall was packed as it never was before. Every seat was crowded.
The aisles were full of men who stood patiently for more than three
hours; the window-sills had their occupants, every foot of standing
room was taken, and in the rear of the galleries men seemed to hang in
swarms like bees. Such was the view from the stage. The stage itself
and the boxes were filled with ladies, giving the speaker an audience
of hundreds who could not see her face. Hardly a listener left the
hall during her speech. Her power over that audience was marvellous.
She seemed to have that absolute mastery of it which Joan of Arc is
reported to have had of the French troops. They followed her with that
deep attention which is unwilling to lose a word, greeting her ever
and anon with bursts of applause. The speech in itself and its effect
was magnificent. The work of the campaign is done, and it only remains
in the name of all loyal men in this district to express to Miss
Dickinson most heartfelt thanks for her inspiring aid. She has aroused
everywhere respect, enthusiasm, and devotion, not to herself alone,
but to our country also. While such women are possible in the United
States, there is not a spot big enough for her to stand on, that will
not be fought for so long as there is a man left.--_Hartford Courant._

[34] Her profits on this occasion were about a thousand dollars.

[35] CORRESPONDENCE.

TO MISS ANNA E. DICKINSON, _Philadelphia, Pa._:

MISS DICKINSON:--Heartily appreciating the value of your services
in the campaigns in New Hampshire, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and
New York, and the qualities that have combined to give you the
deservedly high reputation you enjoy; and desiring as well to
testify that appreciation, as to secure to ourselves the pleasure
of hearing you, we unite in cordially inviting you to deliver an
address at the capital this winter, at some time suited to your
own convenience.

WASHINGTON, D.C., _Dec. 16, 1863_.

Hannibal Hamlin,
Charles Sumner,
Henry Wilson,
Benjamin F. Wade,
John Sherman,
James Dixon,
H. B. Anthony,
Ira Harris, and sixteen other Senators.
Schuyler Colfax,
Thaddeus Stephens,
William D. Kelley,
Robert C.



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