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If there is
anything new to be done, now is the time to do it; if anything
wrong was done last year, now is the time to rectify it. This is
the great, golden opportunity of this Association. It is especial
cause for rejoicing that it is organized for a specific purpose,
to secure the ballot to women, everything else being held for the
time in abeyance. Early in the movement in behalf of women the
broad platform of "woman's rights" was adopted. This was all
proper and right then, but the progress of reform has developed
the fact that suffrage for woman is the great key that will
unlock to her the doors of social and political equality. This
should be the first point of concentrated attack. Suffrage is not
the only object, but it is the first, to be attained. When we
gave our Association that name we escaped a vast deal of
discussion and argument, for its object can not be misunderstood.
But after that is gained there will be worlds yet to conquer. If
the conservatives think that because it is called the Woman
Suffrage Association it has no further object, they are greatly
mistaken. Its purpose and aim are to equalize the sexes in all
the relations of life; to reduce the inequalities that now exist
in matters of education, in social life and in the
professions--to make them equal in all respects, before the law,
society, and the world. With this burden upon our shoulders we
can not carry all the other ills of the world in addition, we
must take one thing at a time. Suffrage for woman gained, and all
else will speedily follow.

H. B. Blackwell, Chairman of the Committee on Credentials,
presented the report of delegates present.[188]

On motion of Mrs. Dr. Ferguson, seconded by Judge Bradwell, each
delegation was authorized to cast the full vote of the State it
represents. The number of votes to which each State was entitled
was declared to be that of its Congressional representation.


Mrs. LUCY STONE, Chairman of the Executive Committee, read the

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

_Annual Report of the Chairman of the Executive Committee of
the American Woman Suffrage Association:_

The American Woman Suffrage Association was formed in this
city one year ago under the most favorable auspices. Its one
great object is to secure the ballot for woman. Through the
power this will give, she may take her true place, free to
use every gift and faculty she possesses, subject only to
the law of benevolence. This organization has been vastly
influential in securing public sympathy and respect for our
ideas. The very names of its officers gave confidence, and
through their confidence the cause has received large
accessions of strength. We have already nine auxiliary State
societies. Each of these has held conventions. Some have
employed lecturers, some have organized county and local
societies. All have circulated tracts and petitions. Ohio,
Indiana, and Massachusetts have been especially abundant in
labor. Ohio has thirty-one local societies, Indiana
twenty-five, and Massachusetts five. These States have had a
force of excellent speakers in the field, who, with rare
self-forgetting, have worked as only those can who work with
whole-hearted faith for immortal principles.

Under the auspices of this Association, a canvass was made
in the State of Vermont. The sole reason which induced the
Executive Committee to undertake this special work was that
the Council of Censors had submitted a proposition that
"henceforth women may vote, and with no other restrictions
than are prescribed for men." A Vermont State Woman Suffrage
Association was organized, auxiliary to the American
Society.

The speech of Mr. Curtis at our May mass meeting, so
admirable in style and substance we have published in a
tract entitled "Fair Play for Women." Thousands of copies
have been sent to all parts of the United States. It is
doing its silent work by quiet firesides, where hard-working
men and women, who can never attend a convention, can find
time to read. We have published seven tracts, which had
previously been sold at $5.00 a hundred, at the actual cost
of $2.00 per hundred, and keep them constantly for sale at
these low prices. They have been scattered broadcast, and
the good seed thus sown will bear fruit in due season.

There has been steady progress in our ideas during the whole
year. The _Woman's Journal_, established last January, and
since consolidated with the _Woman's Advocate_, of Ohio, is
constantly increasing its circulation, more than a thousand
new subscribers having been added within a single month.

One of the most significant signs of progress is found in
the recent action of the Republican party in Massachusetts.
Their State Convention unanimously admitted Mary A.
Livermore and Lucy Stone, who were regularly accredited
delegates from the towns of Melrose and West Brookfield. A
resolution in favor of making woman suffrage part of the
platform was reported by the Committee on Resolutions. A
change of only 29 votes out of 331 would have made woman
suffrage this year a part of the Republican platform of
Massachusetts. Thus women have been admitted to represent
men in a political State Convention. The next step will be
that women will represent themselves.

With all these cheering indications, we have only to keep
our question of woman's right to the ballot clear and
unmixed with other issues, and the growing public sympathy
will soon carry our cause to a successful issue.

Judge Bradwell, of Chicago, presented the following letter to the
Chair, which was read to the Association:

_To the American Woman Suffrage Association;_

FRIENDS AND CO-WORKERS: We, the undersigned, a committee
appointed by the Union Woman Suffrage Society in New York,
May, 1870, to confer with you on the subject of merging the
two organizations into one, respectfully announce:

1st. That in our judgment no difference exists between the
objects and methods of the two societies, nor any good
reason for keeping them apart.

2d. That the society we represent has invested us with full
power to arrange with you a union of both under a single
constitution and executive.

3d. That we ask you to appoint a committee of equal number
and authority with our own, to consummate if possible this
happy result.

Yours, in the common cause of woman's enfranchisement,

LAURA CURTIS BULLARD, ISABELLA BEECHER HOOKER,
GERRIT SMITH, SAMUEL J. MAY,
SARAH PUGH, CHARLOTTE E. WILBOUR,
FREDERICK DOUGLASS, JOSEPHINE S. GRIFFING,
MATTIE GRIFFITH BROWN, THEODORE TILTON, _ex officio_.
JAMES W. STILLMAN,

Judge BRADWELL made a few remarks on the subject of the letter,
advocating the union of the two organizations, and proposing the
following resolution:

_Whereas_, In Article II. of the Constitution of the
American Woman Suffrage Association it is stated, "Its
object shall be to concentrate the efforts of all the
advocates of woman suffrage in the United States," and
whereas the Union Woman Suffrage Association, of which
Theodore Tilton is President, has appointed a committee of
eleven persons with full power to agree upon a basis for the
union of the two national associations, now, therefore, be
it

_Resolved_, That the convention for the purpose of carrying
out the object of said association, as expressed in said
Article II., and concentrating the efforts of all the
friends of woman suffrage throughout the Union for national
purposes, do hereby appoint.... who, with the eleven persons
heretofore appointed by said Woman Suffrage Society, shall
compose a joint committee with full power to form a union of
the American Woman Suffrage Association and the Union Woman
Suffrage Society under one constitution and one set of
officers. It is further provided, after notice to all, that
a majority of said joint committee shall have power to act.

The above was referred to the Committee on Resolutions.

At the afternoon session Vice-President Higginson invited the
Vice-Presidents of the associations of different States to seats
upon the platform.

Mrs. LUCY STONE was introduced, and gave an interesting account
of the course pursued by her and Mrs. Livermore in a
Massachusetts convention. Here the two ladies were received as
delegates, took their places among the regular delegates of the
convention, and voted with them. After that they urged their lady
friends to attend the ward meetings. The women of Massachusetts,
she said, paid taxes on $100,000,000 of property, the women of
Boston on $40,000,000. She thought it good policy to work inside
the parties.

Mrs. Dr. FERGUSON, of Indiana, thought it necessary to begin by
sowing the seeds of the doctrine. Meetings had been held in
different parts of the State. One was held on the sidewalk, was
well attended, and was followed by a large meeting.



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