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She alluded
to the fight for freedom in the days gone by--a fight in which
nearly all present had taken a part, and prophesied that as they
had won that fight they would win the fight in which they were
now engaged. In conclusion she said that in the name of justice,
in the name of humanity, in the name of love, she demanded that
the rights which woman desired should be accorded to her. The
Convention then adjourned.

The following extract is from an editorial in the _Woman's
Journal_:

The Convention of the American Woman Suffrage Association in
Washington [1871] was in every sense a success.

It made a calm, deliberate statement of the reasons that
make the exercise of suffrage woman's right and duty. It
made a strong and earnest appeal to the intellect and
conscience of the country in behalf of equal rights for all.
The speakers were selected beforehand, and came prepared to
do justice to their subject. Accordingly the proceedings
were orderly, harmonious, and effective, and the influence
exerted was serious and impressive. The resolution adopted
at the annual meeting in Philadelphia, a fortnight before,
affirming that woman suffrage, which means equality in the
home, means also greater purity, constancy, and permanence
in marriage, was reaffirmed.

Hon. Geo. F. Hoar made an admirable argument in behalf of
suffrage at the closing session. A large number of Senators
and Representatives attended the meetings. Many of these,
among others Senators Morton and Wilson, assured us of their
hearty sympathy with our movement. The most kindly and
genial hospitality was extended to the speakers by the
citizens of Washington, and nothing occurred to mar the
pleasure or diminish the influence of the meetings, which
were very largely attended, the audiences averaging one
thousand.

We have just reason to complain of the spirit of the
Washington press, as manifested in their reports of the
Convention. The sole exception was the _Daily Chronicle_,
which was fair and friendly. The other reports amounted to
little more than a burlesque, and the editorial comments
consisted chiefly of denunciation and ridicule. The N.Y.
_Tribune_, finding nothing to ridicule in our proceedings,
suppressed all mention of the Convention, not publishing
even the brief notices of the Associated Press. Having
charged woman suffrage with hostility to marriage, the
_Tribune_ has carefully refrained from informing its readers
that the American Woman Suffrage Association, representing
thirteen organized State societies, has held for the first
time a Convention in Washington, solely to urge the claim of
woman to legal and political equality. We wait to see
whether the _Tribune_ will be equally reticent, hereafter.
But neither the silence nor the misrepresentations of our
opponents will check the steady growth and progress of the
woman suffrage movement.

H. B. B.

The following is a short extract from the able address of Hon. G.
F. Hoar, Representative from Massachusetts, who said:

He would prefer the subject left to the leaders on the
platform and only be a follower in the ranks, but on command
of those having the matter in hand he had come to show his
colors. As he understood the subject, it was to assure the
American people that it was right to admit women to
participate in the affairs of government. They were using
the best minds and brains to draw out the arguments on this
subject, and some of our wisest fellow-citizens have been
unable to see any favorable argument for granting this
privilege. He then proceeded to give the ideas entertained
by citizens of the different foreign countries as to what
was the object of the republic, and said that this country
was made up of the aggregate personal worth of the people.
There could not be in a State a man having the right to
compel another to be subject to him without being unjust.
Therefore it is said that all men are created equal. Is it
right and safe that the women of this country should have a
voice in its administration? The only way to find out would
be by having the understanding of those persons who are to
accomplish it and carry it into effect. If there was
anything in which woman excelled man it was her penetration
and correct judgment of persons at first sight. It by no
means follows that because woman has the right to vote, that
entitles her to hold office. That right is vested in the
judgment of our fellow-citizens, who, if they regard us as
worthy and capable, will elect us to the offices.

Upon the Convention held in Baltimore, the following editorial
appeared in the _Woman's Journal_:

In no one State of the Union has there been a more rapid
advance in public sentiment, during the last ten years, upon
all public questions, than in the State of Maryland. In 1861
a woman suffrage meeting in Baltimore would have been a
failure. In 1871 the Convention of the American Woman
Suffrage Association has proved the very reverse. Two
evening sessions and two intermediate day sessions were well
attended. The speakers were Lucy Stone, Margaret W.
Campbell, Elizabeth K. Churchill, and Henry B. Blackwell.

Notwithstanding the disappointment felt by the audience at
the unexpected absence of Mrs. Julia Ward Howe and Rev.
James Freeman Clarke, great interest was manifested, and the
newspapers of the city gave the meetings candid and
respectful notices. We were more than gratified by the
unusual fairness and courtesy displayed by the press of
Baltimore. Indeed, to this and especially to the generous
aid of that admirable paper, the Baltimore _American_, are
largely due the success of our meetings. We feel all the
more bound to notice this frank and generous treatment of a
new and unpopular movement by the press of Maryland because
we have felt it our duty to condemn the striking contrast
exhibited in other quarters. In Baltimore competent
reporters made a conscientious abstract of the speeches they
professed to report. When this is done in New York and
Washington, the woman suffrage cause will have less
difficulty in enlisting public attention.

We were also exceedingly gratified to find that the laws of
Maryland for wives, mothers, and widows, though still far
from equitable, are greatly in advance of those of
Massachusetts and of most Northern States. We are promised
by one of the most eminent lawyers of Baltimore a full
statement of the legal status of married women in Maryland.
We shall publish it in the _Woman's Journal_, as an evidence
that equity and liberality are not bounded by "Mason and
Dixon" or any other geographical line.

H. B. B.

A mass convention of the American Woman Suffrage Association at
Apollo Hall, New York, on the 9th of May, 1872, was an
interesting and successful meeting. Mrs. LUCY STONE presided, and
made the opening address. Rev. James Freeman Clarke, Charlotte B.
Wilbour, Mary F. Eastman, Rev. Edward Eggleston, Helen M.
Jenkins, Henry B. Blackwell, Amanda Deyo, and others addressed
the Convention.

Some disappointment was felt at the unavoidable absence of Mr.
Garrison, Mrs. Bowles, and Mrs. Livermore, the two former being
detained by severe indisposition. In consequence of an error of
dates on the part of the proprietors of Steinway Hall, the
meeting was held at an unusual place; nevertheless, the number of
persons in attendance at the three sessions averaged seven
hundred, and was composed, for the most part, of substantial,
reliable friends of the movement. The notices of the Press were
brief, but respectful. The Convention declined to take any
separate political action, arraigned the so-called "Liberal
Republicans" for their illiberal exclusion of women, and appealed
to the approaching National Conventions at Philadelphia and
Baltimore for a recognition of the rightful claims of woman to
legal and political equality.

The American Woman Suffrage Association held in 1872 its fourth
annual meeting, and celebrated its third anniversary at St.
Louis.

Dr. STONE, of Michigan, said: Friends of the cause of universal
suffrage--We live in an era of common sense. Sir William
Hamilton, who was a great philosopher, and who investigated all
the systems of philosophy from Aristotle down to Descartes and
Kant, who went to the lowest depths of philosophy, dived deep for
pearls, sometimes bringing up also mud and clams, declared after
all his survey of the various schools of philosophy, that the
great regulating power of the human mind was common sense; that
of all the faculties, that which controlled all others was common
sense. That was the basis of his system of philosophy. Now it is
just as appropriate as friends of social and political reform,
that we should rely upon common sense, as it was for this great
philosopher, and it is this on which we purpose to rely.



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