A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
Now it is
just as appropriate as friends of social and political reform,
that we should rely upon common sense, as it was for this great
philosopher, and it is this on which we purpose to rely. Wherever
there is a battle to be fought, they who make the best use and
most continued exercise of common sense are sure to win. This is
not only true in moral contests, in the strife of mind with mind,
but it is true in those material contests such as we have
recently had. It was true in the great contest between Germany
and France. It was this the crusaders lacked, and the reason why
they spent so many ages in doing nothing was that they did not
exercise their common sense. When the Jews, by their follies, by
their obduracy, had destroyed themselves, and the Almighty wished
to bring them to their senses, he said, "Come, let us reason
together." For he knew if they would exercise their common sense
they would no longer be rebellious as they had been. And it is
true at the present time. I think if we can succeed in inducing
those who differ from us to reason--I mean to exercise that
regulating power which the common mind as well as the philosophic
mind possesses, if they would exercise their common sense, the
battle would be fought and the victory would be won. Sometimes
circumstances unexpectedly bring men to their senses in these
matters. We know there has been a great deal of discussion on the
subject of slavery, and we needed a Dred Scott decision to bring
men to their senses. When they contemplated that in all its
bearings and ultimate results, common sense said: It can never be
endured; we have had enough of this going on. Let us come
directly to the point. Is a negro a man? Is he a rational,
accountable man or not? If a beast has rights we are bound to
respect, and if a man for abusing it may be thrown into the
penitentiary, is it possible that he who is made in the image of
God is without rights? Does not common sense teach that we have
some rights, and if our laws contradict such a decision as this
it is time we have better laws, and such as common sense will
approve. We want some one to rise in the cause of suffrage to cut
the Gordian knot that binds the community, that binds churches,
that binds good men everywhere, as well as those who are willing
to be mistaken. A single word from Gen. Butler, who, whatever may
have been charged against him, is not lacking in common sense,
the single word "contraband," wrought a revolution in the midst
of our rebellion, and to that we owe to a great extent our
success in the war. We want such a gleam of light to burst upon
the minds of the community, upon the great American people who
are interested in the subject. The field is ours for the next
four years, and we will strive to impress the doctrines of common
sense upon all men and all women everywhere, until the atmosphere
shall be full of it and all shall take it in by absorption.

Mrs. LONGLEY, of Cincinnati, said--_Ladies and Gentlemen_: In a
country where "No taxation without representation" is a
watchword, and where it is held that "all just governments derive
their powers from the consent of the governed," it should be
unnecessary to plead for the recognition of the right of half its
people to participate in making the laws by which they are taxed
and governed. The justice of woman's claim to the ballot is so
self-evident, and so entirely in accord with the spirit of our
institutions and the fundamental principles upon which they are
based, that I often feel as though it were offering an insult to
American men to undertake to argue the question. But, every
election day reminds us that these fundamental principles which
our forefathers fought to establish are outraged. "We, the
people," they said, yet nearly a century finds half the people
ignored, half the people taxed without being represented, and
governed without their consent. I know it is held that the
expression "the people" in the Constitution does not include
women, and should not be interpreted literally; but it appears to
me that if we engage in this method of interpretation of
constitutions and laws we shall soon get things mixed. If the
expression does not include women in the sense of voters it does
not include them in the sense of tax-payers, nor in the sense of
criminals, nor does it even include them as being entitled to
the enjoyment of "life, liberty, and the pursuit of
happiness"--as the Declaration of Independence declares "a
people" to be entitled to these.

Surely it will not be said that the rights of half the people of
the United States were ignored by the men who framed the
Constitution of the United States. It was evidently the object of
the Constitution to secure equal rights to all. The Constitution
of the United States recognizes the great principle of human
equality, and the rights of women can not be delegated to or
represented by their husbands. Women who believe that they are
responsible to God only, are not willing to be circumscribed by
men.

Mrs. HANNAH M. TRACY CUTLER said that this was a progressive, a
growing, and a glorious country. All people came here and found
protection under its generous shelter, more or less. We had been
digging away at this suffrage question until, in her opinion, we
are getting pretty near the foundation of government. We are
pulling up the old ideas and throwing them out of the way and
making room for the grand tree of liberty to grow. That tree has
already grown to considerable size, and flourished more or less
under the generous protection of our institutions--less a good
deal, the negro said a few years ago, though now he begins to
realize that it is more.

We women are quite well protected. Sometimes we are protected a
great deal more than we want to be. [Several ladies in the
audience, "That's so!" and laughter.] The American men are the
best men under the sun. Each one of them is a prince of the blood
royal. That's a reasonably good compliment. Now, gentlemen, turn
round and say to the women of America, "You are each and every
one of you a princess by divine right, and we will give you even
the half of our kingdom." That is all we ask. But they say, "Show
us the precedent. The thing never has been done before. The women
have been ignored in government from the earliest days until
now," etc. Why, gentlemen, away back in the remote ages of
history--so far that the memory of man runneth not distinctly
thereto--we find that women not only lived and gave men to the
world, but that they lived and gave laws to the world.

Mrs. STONE, the President, said she would like to speak to the
delegates and friends, because she knew those who were here had
been working in this cause for years. They are short of time, but
all give it that deep, earnest baptism of work for the principles
that underlie republican institutions. They would work until that
end is achieved, or until death relieved them from their labor.
She felt cheered on seeing the progress they had made. It was
about twenty years since the speaker came to this city to deliver
a course of lectures for woman's rights. They called it woman's
rights in those days. They did not use the word suffrage at all;
and, as she stood there now, her mind ran back over a score of
years. When she counted the gains they had made, it seemed as if
she had been in some fairy palace, and by charms the old wrongs
had dropped away and new good had sprung up. They had fought for
woman's rights, and had taken hold of the hands of little girls
growing out of girlhood into womanhood--girls who must stand on
their own feet and earn a living for themselves. When there was
no father's hand or brother's arm to help, what could woman do?
She looked out into the great thoroughfares of industry open to
all men, and almost all were shut against her. Woman was a
teacher at a dollar a day, and had to board round. She was a
seamstress with still smaller pay, or she was a housekeeper at
her own house or somebody's else, where, so far as material gains
were concerned, the results were small. Other industries were
shut to her. The world is as full of women as men. They have to
eat, drink, and be clothed, and, until other opportunities are
obtained, their supplies are infinitely smaller than those
offered to men. Why should women, whose supple fingers can set
type--why should not they be type-setters? The printers joined
together in bands and swore by all the gods they knew that women
should not be printers. They joined together in a body and
printed in a book that they would not work for any man who
employed women as printers. They thought it would degrade the
labor of man. The reformers asked for what was honest, good, and
true, and found a response in the business interest of men, and
the way was opened for women printers. Instead of brothers
talking of supporting their sisters and making themselves poor
they now worked side by side. A paper which they would have here
for subscription--the _Woman's Journal_--came from an office
where all the printers, with two exceptions, were girls; and the
man who managed the office said it was an advantage, because the
girls are always sober and never go on a spree. He could always
be sure of having the paper out at the right time. The steady,
honest, little women printers are always there. They asked why
the women could not go into the stores and sell shoes, cloth, and
dry goods, and why should not men build cities and sail ships and
do what larger muscles fit them for?



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.