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There is more sober, candid talk on
the subject in private circles, here in Ohio, than ever
before. Our students in the University are asking questions,
with a desire for intelligent answers, and at home, in
Sydney, before I left, many experienced politicians
confessed it to be the one thing needful. I am sure it is
gaining ground among our quiet, sensible people. The stir
may not be so demonstrative in cities as formerly, but
through the country there is a general awakening. If we can
only have patience to wait, we shall not be disappointed.
Right, sooner or later, will come into its kingdom. Women
are no longer children to be frightened by imaginary bears,
neither will they be satisfied with playthings, who ask for
better. The distance between men and women is lessening
every year. Colleges are bringing them on to the same plane,
and the agitation of this question of woman's right to a
voice in the government, has given and is giving men new
ideas respecting the strength of woman's intellect and her
determination to be more than a doll in this busy world.

Whether we are made voting citizens or not, let no man
beguile himself with the thought that the old order of
things will be restored. They who step into light and
freedom will not retrace their steps. This end is equality,
civil, religious and political--there is no stopping-place
this side of that. My best wishes are with you and yours.

MIRIAM M. COLE.

Miss HULDAH B. LOUD, of East Abington, Mass., was the first
speaker: Scorned by the Democrats and fawned upon by the
Republicans, who profess but to betray, under these circumstances
we come again to the fight. We believe in liberty in the highest
degree, such liberty as our fathers fought for, and this struggle
will go on until that liberty is gained; liberty is the pursuit
of life, health, and happiness. We look in vain for honesty in
political life. We turn in disgust from the meaningless
platitudes of the Republican Convention at Worcester, from the
incidental admission of a plank in the platform which means
nothing.

If we would be recognized as a power by political parties, every
suffragist should withhold his ballot, and thus politicians would
be brought to their senses. If we labor for anything, if we mean
anything, we mean woman suffrage, and let us not give a moral or
material support, politically, to the man who is not in harmony
with the principle of free suffrage in its broadest significance.

We are called unwomanly for our advocacy of this priceless boon
to women. We are willing that our womanly character should stand
by the side of those who oppose this movement. Do you call Lucy
Stone, the woman reformer of the world, with her eloquence, her
soft voice, her matchless, unwearied work for all that is good,
with her motherly appearance, do you call such a woman unwomanly?
Or Margaret Fuller, or Julia Ward Howe, do you call these women
unwomanly? Then let us take our place by them, cast in our lot
with them and be called unwomanly. It is said, and it is sadly
true, that many women do not want the ballot; and it is no less
sadly true that many of our most bitter opponents are our sister
women. But if they do not want the ballot, if you deprive me of
the right you do me a grievous wrong. It is said that if we were
given the privilege of the ballot, we would not use it. Is it any
reason if I do not choose to avail myself of my rights that I
should be deprived of them? Why do you consult women if this
right shall be given them? You did not consult the slave in
regard to his freedom, but you said he was wanted for the
salvation of the country, and you took him and forced freedom
upon him.

Mrs. JULIA WARD HOWE and Mrs. MARY A. LIVERMORE spoke alike with
great force and earnestness upon the moral and religious phases
of the movement.

Mrs. FRANCES WATKINS HARPER, of Philadelphia, made the closing
speech. She showed that much as white women need the ballot,
colored women need it more. Although the women of her race are no
longer sold on the auction block, they are subjected to the legal
authority of ignorant and often degraded men. She rejoiced in the
progress already made, but pleaded for equal rights and equal
education for the colored women of the land.

The PRESIDENT said--Ladies and gentlemen, the letters have been
read, the reports accepted, the resolutions adopted, the
officers[195] for the ensuing year chosen, and there being no
further business before the Convention, it is moved and seconded
that we adjourn _sine die_.

* * * * *

The Sixth Annual Meeting of the American Woman Suffrage
Association assembled at the Opera House in Detroit, Tuesday
morning, Oct. 13, 1874.

Col. W. M. FERRY, of Grand Haven, Chairman of the State Executive
Committee of the Michigan Suffrage Association, called the
meeting to order, and made a brief address of welcome. He spoke
of the pleasure the Convention afforded many of the advocates of
woman suffrage in this city who have the cause deeply at heart.
He then alluded to the authoress of the well-known hymn, "The
Battle Hymn of the Republic," Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, and
introduced her as the President of the American Woman Suffrage
Association.

The Rev. Mrs. GILLETTE, of Rochester, Mich., opened the meeting
with prayer.

The President, Mrs. HOWE, then delivered the Annual Address:

_Ladies and Gentlemen of the American Woman Suffrage
Convention:_

It is my office on the present occasion to welcome you to
this scene of our happy and harmonious meeting. In this
great country many families do not gather their members
together oftener than once in a year. When they accomplish
this they ordain a festival, and call it Thanksgiving Day.
This Association is in some sense a family, whose members
are widely scattered. East, West, North and South claim and
contain us. But when the sacred call for our Annual Meeting
is issued, distances are forgotten, business and pleasures
are interrupted. Like the wave of a magician's wand, the
touch of a common sympathy summons us and keeps us in sight.
Our first feeling, I suppose, is one of great pleasure at
looking each other in the face again. This is our Suffrage
Thanksgiving, and we hope to keep it right cordially.
Welcome, dear friends, faithful sisters and brothers.
Welcome, one and all. In this world of death we still live.
In this world of doubt we still believe in even-handed
justice, and in pure law. So, with one breath, we give God
thanks for our continued life and faith, and wish each other
and our great cause Godspeed.

But we are met for something more than a mere expression of
feeling, however cordial and timely that might be. We meet
here to take counsel for the spiritual welfare to which each
one of us stands pledged. How goes the good fight? Let each
department of our little army tell. What victories have been
achieved, what defeats suffered with patience? How shall we
improve the one? What shall we learn from the other? Oh! let
us feel that these rare moments of our meeting are precious.
Here we must compare notes and learn what has been done.
Here, too, we must briefly survey what is yet to do and how
it is to be done. May no moment in this too brief season be
wasted! May we all speak and act in view of great
necessities and of high hopes. We may take for our text the
words: "Now is our salvation nearer than when we believed."
But we must also acknowledge that the end is not yet.

Every year that sees us banded together in pursuit of our
present object sees a wonderful growth in its prominence and
recognized importance. Opposition has grown with our
efforts. People at first said, "Nobody will resist you."
This was when people thought we were in fun. But when it
appeared that we were in sad and bitter earnest, opposition
was not wanting. Wherever we came to plead the cause of
human freedom, the enemies of human freedom met and
withstood us. All the professions have befriended--all,
too, have opposed us. We have stood before powers and
dignitaries to maintain what we believe; and while we have
asked that the right of suffrage be recognized in the
persons of women, women learned and unlearned have stood up
to ask that our petition should not be granted. We need not
say that for one woman who has done this, hundreds and
thousands have risen up to bless the woman suffrage cause
and its champions. And for every doctor, lawyer and priest
who has shrieked forth or set forth our presumptive
disabilities, a tenfold number of men in all of these
callings have arisen to do battle for the right, and to tell
us on the authority of their special knowledge and
experience, that the reform we ask for is congenial to
nature and founded on right. Goldwin Smith, a man knowing
naught of woman, airs his irrational views in the English
_Fortnightly_, and Frances Power Cobbe and Prof.



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