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Text on one page: Few Medium Many
Cairnes,
and a host of others, unravel the net of his flimsy
statements. Drs. Clarke and Maudsley dogmatize from their
male view of the female constitution; and from men and women
throughout the country an indignant protest rises up. Men
and women say alike: "It is not education that demoralizes
and diseases our women. It is want of education, want of
object, want of right knowledge of ends and methods." And
how shall we acquire this unless we are taught? And how
shall we be taught unless provision is made for us? And how
shall provision be made for us unless we make it ourselves
by voting for it?

Some mention is due to the place in which we meet. We are in
the State of Michigan, a State in which the question of
impartial suffrage has been carefully canvassed and
presented during the past year. Within a short distance from
us is the University of Michigan, liberal to men and to
women, whose scholarly claims and merits its Professors and
its President openly and earnestly attest. We claim that
institution as our potent ally. It furnishes the remedy to
all that we complain of. Equal education for the sexes is
the true preparation for equality in civil and social
ordinances. Even at this distance we breathe something of
that pure air in which the woman grows to her full
intellectual stature, untrammeled by artificial limitation
of object and of method. We boast our own Boston, its
culture and its conscience, but while Harvard persistently
closes its doors to women, we blush too for New England, and
sorrowfully wish it better enlightenment and better
behavior.

Having spoken of the East and the West, let me say how
welcome to us of the East are occasions which make us better
acquainted with our fellow-workers and believers of the
West. The late Mr. Seward once said that slavery was
sectional and freedom National. This was true in a larger
sense than that in which he said it. All that is slavish
tends to keep up sectional prejudice and isolation. All that
is liberal tends to sympathy and union. East and West are
the two hands of this mighty country--let the harmony of the
present occasion show that they have but one heart between
them. Are not all our chief possessions held in common? We
gave you Sumner and you gave us Lincoln. We fought together
the war of our late enfranchisement, and when God shall give
us impartial suffrage as an established fact, it will be
hard to discriminate between our work and yours. But the two
hands will then be clasped, and the one heart uplifted with
a throb of thankfulness that shall make our whole Nation
one, and that forever. For the present moment, while we
workers for woman suffrage can make no boast as to the final
adoption of our method, we can yet rejoice in the results
which already crown our work. Christ, in the very infancy of
his mission, looked abroad and saw the fields already white
with the harvest.

The different agencies employed by this and kindred
associations have plowed and furrowed the land far and near.
They have dropped everywhere the seed of a true word, of a
right feeling. How small a thing may this dropping of a seed
seem to a careless observer! Yet it is the very life of the
world which the patient farmer sows and reaps. So, our
laborious meetings and small measures; our speeches, soon
forgotten; our writings, soon dismissed; our petitions to
Legislatures, never entertained; all these seem small things
to do. The world says: "Why do you not labor to build up
fortunes and reputations for yourselves if you will labor?
Why do you waste your time and efforts on this ungrateful
soil?" But we may reply that we have the joy of Christ in
our hearts. In every furrow, some seed springs up; from
every effort, some sympathy, some conviction results. When
we look about us and see the number of suffrage associations
formed in the different States, we too can say that the
fields are white already to harvest.

White already. Yet centuries of martyrdom lay between the
sowing of Christ and the harvest which we reap to-day. All
of those centuries brought and took away faithful souls who
continued the work, who gathered and reaped and sowed again.
And we, too, know not what years of patient endeavor may yet
be in store for us before we see the end of our suffrage
work. We know not whether most of us shall not taste of
death before we do see it, passing away on the borders of
the promised land, with its fair regions still unknown to
us. And yet we see the end as by faith. By faith we can
prophesy of what shall come. The new state, in which for the
first time ideal justice shall be crowned and recognized;
the new church, in which there shall be neither male nor
female; but the new creature that shall represent on either
side free and perfect humanity. Like a bride coming down
from Heaven, like a resurrection coming out of the earth, it
shall appear and abide. And we, whether we shall see it as
living souls or as quickening spirits, shall rejoice in it.

Miss EASTMAN read the following letter:

LARAMIE CITY, W. T., Sept. 22, 1874.

Mrs. LUCY STONE, _Chairman of the Executive
Committee:_--Your favor of the 12th inst. is received. I
wish I could be with you at your meeting in Detroit next
month, but I am so crowded with engagements here that I do
not think I can get away. We have just had another election,
and at no time have we had so full a vote. Our women have
taken a lively interest, and have voted quite as universally
as the men. Their influence has been felt more than ever and
generally on the side of the best men. Several candidates
have been defeated on account of their want of good
characters, who expected success on party grounds. It is the
general sentiment with us now that it will not do to
nominate men for whom the women will not vote. Is not this a
great step in advance? When candidates for office must come
with a character that will stand the criticism of the women
or be sure of defeat, we shall have a higher tone of
political morals.

I hear it urged abroad that woman suffrage is not popular in
Wyoming, but I hear nothing of the kind here. All parties
now favor it. Those who once opposed it oppose it no longer,
while its friends are more and more attached to it, as they
see its practical benefits and feel its capacity for good.
No one that I hear of wishes it abolished, and no one would
dare propose its repeal. The women are beginning to feel
their power and influence, and are growing up to a wider and
stronger exertion of it. I think I can see a conscious
appreciation of this in a higher dignity and a better
self-respect among them. They talk and think of graver
subjects and of responsibilities which ennoble them. A woman
will not consent to be a butterfly when she can of her own
choice become an eagle! Let her enjoy the ambitions of life;
let her be able to secure its honors, its riches, its high
places, and she will not consent to be its toy or its simple
ornament.

Very respectfully, J. W. KINGMAN.

Miss EASTMAN said that this letter presented just the evidence on
the result and experience of woman suffrage that was wanted. She
said that women were very inconsiderate and indifferent to this
question. Women, until they are brought to think upon the matter,
generally say they do not want to vote. She spoke of the laws of
some States which allow the taking away from a mother of her
children, by a person who had been appointed as their guardian,
in place of her dead husband, and of the laws severe in other
respects which States have made in relation to women. She wished
all persons had the question put to them conscientiously whether
woman had all the power she wanted. We do want, she said, every
legitimate power, and we shall never be content with a tithe less
than we can command.

Gen. A. C. VORIS, of Ohio, read letters from the following
persons, regretting their inability to attend the Convention:
Bishop Gilbert Haven, D.D., of the Methodist Episcopal Church;
from Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Judge Wm. H. West, of Ohio; Hon.
C. W. Willard, of Vermont; Hon. G. W. Julian, of Indiana; Hon. D.
H. Chamberlain, of South Carolina; William Lloyd Garrison, George
William Curtis, the Smith sisters, Richard Fiske, Jr.

Rev. Mrs. GILLETTE, of Rochester, Mich., said every woman as well
as every man should speak for what she believes to be necessary
for her own well-being and for the well-being of the community.
Charles Sumner once said that a woman's reason was the reason of
the heart. She would give a few womanly reasons why she wanted
the voters of Michigan to give the ballot to women. The want of
the ballot prevents woman from possessing knowledge and power.



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