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He was
so entirely in love with it that he thought it deserved the
highest eloquence and the profoundest earnestness it could
command to advance it. He knew of no reason why a man should vote
and a woman not. The republic needed the good qualities of its
citizens to help it, and recognizing the intelligence and heart
of women he was in favor of opening every avenue by which their
moral worth could be utilized for the benefit of the country. It
was an injury to keep any person in this country from the ballot
when suffrage was universal. It was a degradation. If you want to
keep a man out of the mud, black his boots. If you want to
develop woman's best qualities, give her the ballot.

Mrs. MARY E. HAGGART, of Indiana, followed with a bold and
brilliant argument, presenting the claims of her sex to the
ballot.

Mrs. MARY A. LIVERMORE asked how it was that women to-day are
exposed to a hotter fire than ever before. Women are not as much
toasted at banquets or flattered with extravagant compliments as
a few years ago. She warned her hearers that if woman continued
to make of herself a peg to hang millinery goods on, she would be
riddled with the shafts of ridicule. If she entered the sphere of
man, and sought, by the cultivation of her intellect, to elevate
both herself and man, she would equally expose herself to satire.
The times were different now from the past. The question of woman
suffrage in one form or another was constantly coming up
everywhere.

Officers[207] were elected for the ensuing year.

Mrs. LIVERMORE said, as this was a political meeting of men and
women, she hoped it would be closed after the usual fashion, by
singing the doxology. The whole audience rose and sang it, and
the Convention adjourned.

A memorial, signed by the officers of the American Woman Suffrage
Association, asking Congress to establish suffrage for women in
the Territories, was presented to the Senate by Hon. George F.
Hoar, and referred to the Committee on Territories, which was to
give a hearing to a committee from the Suffrage Association. But
no quorum of the Senate Committee came together, and the
opportunity was lost.

On Friday afternoon Mrs. Hayes received the members of the
Suffrage Association with a cordiality and grace most becoming
to her, and most delightful to us; our hearty sympathy with her
good stand for temperance opened the way for conversation, and a
very pleasant two hours were spent at the White House. Mrs. Hayes
took us through the large conservatories, which, she said, had
few flowers, as she "had most of them cut off for the Children's
Hospital Fair." But there were a great many rare and beautiful
flowers remaining. She cut and distributed some among us, and
showed us the private family rooms, the new china ordered for the
White House, and the writing desk made from the wreck of the ship
that went in search of Sir John Franklin, which was presented by
Queen Victoria to the President of the United States. In
numberless ways she showed herself a fine hostess, as well as an
accomplished lady. When at last we separated it was to carry away
the memory of this pleasant visit, and of an excellent meeting.

* * * * *

Nothing could have been finer than the reception given by
Louisville to the American Woman Suffrage Association, which met
in that city October, 1881. The need of extending the outposts,
and of winning new friends to the cause, had decided the
executive committee of the Association to hold its Twelfth Annual
Meeting in Louisville. It was an experiment which the result more
than justified. Success was due in a great degree to the fairness
and friendliness of the press. Mr. Watterson, of the
_Courier-Journal_, said in advance that his paper would give full
and accurate reports. Mr. Clark, of the _Commercial_, personally
expressed his purpose to deal justly by the proceedings of the
meetings. This was all that was needed. Any true statement of the
claim of suffragists is sure to command the respect of right
minded people.

The first session was for business. It was thinly attended by the
citizens of Louisville, there being not more than a hundred and
fifty or two hundred people present. But each succeeding session
increased in numbers until on the last evening, the Grand Opera
House had not seats to hold the great and sympathetic audience,
which completely filled the body and galleries of the house, and
left rows of men and women standing all around against the walls.
The _Courier-Journal_ gave nine columns of verbatim report of the
first day and evening, together with philosophic and friendly
editorials. The _Commercial_, not so large in size, and hence
with less space to use, yet did editorially and by its reports
excellent service, by giving to its readers a true idea of the
work which was sought to be done.

Delegates had come with encouraging reports in most cases, of the
work in twelve States by auxiliary societies. Local societies in
towns sent letters, and letters from individuals--a very large
number--came to hand, all showing how widely woman suffrage ideas
are spreading, and how earnestly its advocates strive to advance
their cause. All these reports the Louisville _Courier-Journal_
published entire, together with the letters of Gov. Long, Gov.
St. John, John G. Whittier, Wendell Phillips, President Bascom,
President Eliot, and others, along with full reports of each
session to the last, and crowned the whole by friendly editorials
the morning after the close of the meetings.

Col. J. W. Ward, of Louisville, had kindly attended to
preliminary arrangements, seconded by Mrs. Sylvia Goddard and
Mrs. Col. Carr. At the opening session, Col. Ward called the
meeting to order, and introduced Dr. Mary F. Thomas, of Indiana,
the President of the association. Rev. Mr. Jones opened the
meeting with prayer. The speaking was excellent; the tone of the
meeting just what we should desire. Col. Ward, Mrs. Mary B. Clay,
and Miss Laura Clay, daughters of Cassius M. Clay, took part. The
two first-named arraigned the laws of Kentucky for their
injustice to women. The old Common Law to a great extent prevails
there still. Dr. T. S. Bell, one of the oldest and most justly
celebrated physicians of Louisville, sat on the platform,
supporting the cause by his presence. People from New Albany and
Evansville, Indiana, crossed the river to attend the sessions.
Lawyers, physicians, clergymen, the educated, the wealthy and the
plain people made up the audiences which crowded the Opera House,
where the earlier and the later advocates of this sacred cause
united to forward it in this new field. At the last of the six
sessions, Rev. Mr. Ashill, in a brief speech, indorsed our
principles, and after prayer by Rev. Mr. Fyler, and the singing
of the doxology, the meeting, which had been one of the most
successful ever held, adjourned, having elected for its president
next year, Hon. Erasmus M. Correll, of Nebraska, who so nobly
championed the suffrage amendment in the State Legislature last
winter, and who now, by speech and pen, devotes himself to secure
its final success.

The seed sown had fallen on good ground--as appears in the fact
that at the last session an invitation was given to all who
desired to form a woman suffrage society to meet in adjoining
rooms the next morning at nine o'clock. At the appointed time, a
fine group of men and women came together, who proceeded at once
to the organization of a "Kentucky Woman Suffrage Society." A
constitution was adopted, which was subscribed to by every person
present, with a dollar membership. Miss Mary B. Clay was chosen
president, and the society made auxiliary to the American Woman
Suffrage Association. The formation of this strong and live
society is of great value, as the organized beginning of the
movement at the South.

The citizens and public institutions of Louisville extended
unsolicited courtesy to the members of the association, who were
officially invited to the Home for the Widows and Orphans of
Masons, the only home of the kind in the United States; to the
House of Refuge; to the Hospital for Women and Children; and to
the High School. Not the least pleasant thing was an interview
with Henry Watterson, the morning after the close of the
meetings. His friendly attitude, his comprehensive view of the
whole situation and question, with his position of large
influence as editor of the _Courier-Journal_, made even those who
have grown old in the service of this cause hopeful of living to
see it victorious. Another mile stone is passed, and the end of
this long bloodless strife comes daily nearer. Let us thank God
and take courage.


FOOTNOTES:

[179] The history of this Association from its formation is compiled
by Harriot E. Stanton, from reports in _The Agitator_ and _Woman's
Journal._

[180] Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, of Chicago; Mrs. Caroline M. Severance,
of Boston; A. J. Boyer, of Dayton; Mrs. H. T. Hazard, of Missouri;
Mrs. C. G. Ames, of California; and H. B. Blackwell, of New Jersey.

[181] Mrs. Frances D. Gage, of N. J.; George W. Curtis, of N. Y.;
George F. Downing, of the District of Columbia; Rev. Henry Blanchard,
of Indianapolis; William Lloyd Garrison, of Boston; Mattie M.
Griffith, of Iowa; Rev. R. Fisk, Canton, N. Y.; A. N. Fretz, of
Virginia; Rev. Edward Eggleston, of Chicago; Hon.



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