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In view of the evident disintegration of parties, we rejoice at the
steady growth of the new issue of woman suffrage, at its successful
establishment in Wyoming and Utah, in England, Holland, Austria, and
Sweden, and at the recent promise of the Republicans of Massachusetts,
at their State Convention, that they "will support all measures
regarding the promotion of equal rights for all American citizens,
irrespective of sex."

And whereas, on the second day of July, 1776 (two days before the
Declaration of Independence), the Provincial Congress of New Jersey,
assembled at Burlington, extended suffrage to all inhabitants, men and
women; therefore,

_Resolved_, That in commemoration of that notable event we hold a
woman suffrage Centennial celebration at Burlington, N. J., on the 2d
day of July, 1876, or at such other place as the Executive Committee
may select.

_Resolved_, That heroic deeds done for justice and human rights
deserve and should receive commemorative tribute from all those who
love justice and respect human rights; that a Centennial celebration
on the Fourth of July next, of the one-hundredth Anniversary of the
Independence of the United States is in the highest degree proper, and
is due to the brave dead who periled all they had to secure the right
to govern themselves; nevertheless,

_Resolved_, That men who use their political and personal power to
deprive women of their right to govern themselves, can not with
consistency have any share in that Centennial celebration.

[200] President: Mrs. Mary A. Livermore.

[201] These facts are given in the chapter on New Jersey, Vol. I.

[202] Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island,
Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland,
West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Texas,
Michigan, Iowa, Minnesota, Colorado, California, Oregon, District of
Columbia.

[203] WHEREAS, The United States Courts have affirmed that the
regulation of suffrage belongs exclusively to the States, and that
"women are citizens and, as such, may be made voters by appropriate
State legislation;" and,

WHEREAS, A sixteenth amendment to the Federal constitution abolishing
political distinctions on account of sex, although just and necessary,
can be more easily obtained when several States have set the example;
therefore,

3. _Resolved_, That we urge every existing State association to
renewed effort upon the next and each following State Legislature; and
in every State where no such association exists, we urge individual
effort and the immediate formation of a State Society.

[204] President--Mrs. Rebecca N. Hazard, of Missouri.

[205] The President chosen for the ensuing year was Henry B.
Blackwell.

[206] 1. _Resolved_, That we urge upon Congress the performance of
three important duties in behalf of the women of America--

First, To enact a law giving women citizens of the United States,
resident in the Territories, the same political rights as are
exercised by the male citizens of the United States resident therein.

Second, To reform the laws affecting the rights of married women in
the District of Columbia and the Territories.

Third, To submit to the States a constitutional amendment prohibiting
political distinction on account of sex.

2. _Resolved_, That we advise our auxiliary State societies to
petition their respective Legislatures to enact a law this winter
conferring suffrage on women in Presidential elections under Section
2, Article 2, of the Federal Constitution.

WHEREAS, Since the last annual meeting of the Association, three
eminent advocates of the claim of women for equal political rights
have passed away--Lucretia Mott, Lydia Maria Child, and Nathaniel
White--therefore,

3. _Resolved_, That the American Woman Suffrage Association records
its grateful appreciation of their invaluable service and its sense of
irreparable loss, now that the eloquent voice is silent, the ready pen
dropped, and the generous hand is cold in death. In the wealth of
their matured character and great achievement they have left us the
permanent inspiration of a noble example.

[207] President, Dr. Mary F. Thomas, of Indiana.




APPENDIX.


CHAPTER XVI.

WOMAN'S PATRIOTISM IN THE WAR.

_House of Representatives_ (_46th Congress_, _3d Session_. Report No.
386).

ANNA ELLA CARROLL.

_March 3, 1881._--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House, and
ordered to be printed.

Mr. Bragg, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the
following Report (to accompany bill H. R. 7,256):

_The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom the memorial of Anna Ella
Carroll was referred, asking national recognition and reward for
services rendered the United States during the war between the States,
after careful consideration of the same, submit the following:_

In the autumn of 1861 the great question as to whether the Union could
be saved, or whether it was hopelessly subverted, depended on the
ability of the Government to open the Mississippi and deliver a fatal
blow upon the resources of the Confederate power. The original plan
was to reduce the formidable fortifications by descending this river,
aided by the gun-boat fleet, then in preparation for that object.

President Lincoln had reserved to himself the special direction of
this expedition, but before it was prepared to move he became
convinced that the obstacles to be encountered were too grave and
serious for the success which the exigencies of the crisis demanded,
and the plan was then abandoned, and the armies diverted up the
Tennessee River, and thence southward to the center of the Confederate
power.

The evidence before this Committee completely establishes that Miss
Anna Ella Carroll was the author of this change of plan, which
involved a transfer of the National forces to their new base in North
Mississippi and Alabama, in command of the Memphis and Charleston
Railroad; that she devoted time and money in the autumn of 1861 to the
investigation of its feasibility is established by the sworn testimony
of L. D. Evans, Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas, to the
Military Committee of the United States Senate in the 42d Congress
(see pp. 40, 41 of memorial); that after that investigation she
submitted her plan in writing to the War Department at Washington,
placing it in the hands of Thomas A. Scott, Assistant Secretary of
War, as is confirmed by his statement (see p. 38 of memorial), also
confirmed by the statement of Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of the
Committee on the Conduct of the War, made to the same Committee (see
p. 38), and of President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton (see p. 39 of
memorial); also by Hon. O. H. Browning, of Illinois, Senator during
the war, in confidential relations with President Lincoln and
Secretary Stanton (see p. 39, memorial); also that of Hon. Elisha
Whittlesey, Comptroller of the Treasury (see p. 41, memorial); also by
Hon. Thomas H. Hicks, Governor of Maryland, and by Hon. Frederick
Feckey's affidavit, Comptroller of the Public Works of Maryland (see
p. 127 of memorial); by Hon. Reverdy Johnson (see pp. 26 and 41,
memorial); Hon. George Vickers, United States Senator from Maryland
(see p. 41, memorial); again by Hon. B. F. Wade (see p. 41, memorial);
Hon. J. T. Headley (see p. 43, memorial); Rev. Dr. R. J. Breckinridge
on services (see p. 47, memorial); Prof. Joseph Henry, Rev. Dr.
Hodge, of Theological Seminary at Princeton (see p. 30, memorial);
remarkable interviews and correspondence of Judge B. F. Wade (see pp.
23-26 of memorial).

That this campaign prevented the recognition of Southern independence
by its fatal effects on the Confederate States is shown by letters
from Hon. C. M. Clay (see pp. 40-43 of memorial), and by his letters
from St. Petersburgh; also those of Mr. Adams and Mr. Dayton from
London and Paris (see pp. 100-102 of memorial).

That the campaign defeated National bankruptcy, then imminent, and
opened the way for the system of finance to defend the Federal cause,
is shown by the debates of the period in both Houses of Congress (see
utterances of Mr. Spalding, Mr. Diven, Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, Mr.
Roscoe Conkling, Mr. John Sherman, Mr. Henry Wilson, Mr. Fessenden,
Mr. Trumbull, Mr. Foster, Mr. Garrett Davis, Mr. John J. Crittendon,
etc., found for convenient reference in appendix to memorial, pp.
47-59. Also therein the opinion of the English press as to why the
Union could not be restored).

The condition of the struggle can best be realized as depicted by the
leading statesmen in Congress previous to the execution of these
military movements (see synopsis of debates from _Congressional
Globe_, pp. 21, 22 of memorial).

The effect of this campaign upon the country and the anxiety to find
out and reward the author are evidenced by the resolution of Mr.
Roscoe Conkling, in the House of Representatives 24th of February,
1862 (see debates on the origin of the campaign, pp. 39-63 of
memorial). But it was deemed prudent to make no public claim as to
authorship while the war lasted (see Colonel Scott's view, p. 32 of
memorial).

The wisdom of the plan was proven, not only by the absolute advantages
which resulted, giving the mastery of the conflict to the National
arms and evermore assuring their success even against the powers of
all Europe should they have combined, but it was likewise proven by
the failures to open the Mississippi or win any decided success on the
plan first devised by the Government.

It is further conclusively shown that no plan, order, letter,
telegram, or suggestion of the Tennessee River as the line of invasion
has ever been produced, except in the paper submitted by Miss Carroll
on the 30th of November, 1861, and her subsequent letters to the
Government as the campaign progressed.

It is further shown to this Committee that the able and patriotic
publications of memorialist, in pamphlets and newspapers, with her
high social influence, not only largely contributed to the cause of
the Union in her own State, Maryland (see Governor Hicks' letters, p.
27, memorial), but exerted a wide and salutary influence on all the
Border States (see Howard's report, p.



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