A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
33 and p. 75 of memorial).

These publications were used by the Government as war measures, and
the debate in Congress shows that she was the first writer on the war
powers of the Government (see p. 45 of memorial). Leading statesmen
and jurists bore testimony to their value, including President
Lincoln, Secretaries Chase, Stanton, Seward, Welles, Smith,
Attorney-General Bates, Senators Browning, Doolittle, Collamer, Cowan,
Reverdy Johnson, and Hicks, Hon. Horace Binney, Hon. Benjamin H.
Brewster, Hon. William M. Meredith, Hon. Robert J. Walker, Hon.
Charles O'Conor, Hon. Edwards Pierrepont, Hon. Edward Everett, Hon.
Thomas Corwin, Hon. Francis Thomas, of Maryland, and many others found
in memorial.

The Military Committee, through Senator Howard, in the Forty-first
Congress, third session, document No. 337, unanimously reported that
Miss Carroll did cause the change of the military expedition from the
Mississippi to the Tennessee River, etc.; and the aforesaid Committee,
in the Forty-second Congress, second session, document No. 167, as
found in memorial, reported, through the Hon. Henry Wilson, the
evidence and bill in support of this claim.

Again, in the Forty-fourth Congress, the Military Committee of the
House favorably considered this claim, and General A. S. Williams was
prepared to report, and being prevented by want of time, placed on
record that this claim is incontestably established, and that the
country owes to Miss Carroll a large and honest compensation, both in
money and honors, for her services in the National crisis.

In view of all the facts, this Committee believe that the thanks of
the nation are due Miss Carroll, and that they are fully justified in
recommending that she be placed on the pension rolls of the
Government, as a partial measure of recognition for her public
service, and report herewith a bill for such purpose and recommend its
passage.

Hon. E. M. Stanton came into the War Department, in 1862, pledged to
execute the Tennessee campaign.

_Statement from Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of the Committee on the
Conduct of the War, April 4, 1876._

DEAR MISS CARROLL:--I had no part in getting up the committee; the
first intimation to me was that I had been made the head of it. But I
never shirked a public duty, and at once went to work to do all that
was possible to save the country. We went fully into the examination
of the several plans for military operations then known to the
Government, and we saw plainly enough that the time it must take to
execute any of them would make it fatal to the Union.

We were in the deepest despair, until just at this time Colonel Scott
informed me that there was a plan already devised that if executed
with secrecy would open the Tennessee and save the National cause. I
went immediately to Mr. Lincoln and talked the whole matter over. He
said he did not himself doubt that the plan was feasible, but said
there was one difficulty in the way, that no military or naval man had
any idea of such a movement, it being the work of a _civilian_, and
none of them would believe it safe to make such an advance upon only a
navigable river with no protection but a gun-boat fleet, and they
would not want to take the risk. He said it was devised by Miss
Carroll, and military men were extremely jealous of all outside
interference. I plead earnestly with him, for I found there were
influences in his Cabinet then averse to his taking the
responsibility, and wanted everything done in deference to the views
of McClellan and Halleck. I said to Mr. Lincoln, "You know we are now
in the last extremity, and you have to choose between adopting and at
once executing a plan that you believe to be the right one, and save
the country, or defer to the opinions of military men in command, and
lose the country." He finally decided he would take the initiative,
but there was Mr. Bates, who had suggested the gun-boat fleet, and
wanted to advance down the Mississippi, as originally designed, but
after a little he came to see no result could be achieved on that mode
of attack, and he united with us in favor of the change of expedition
as you recommended.

After repeated talks with Mr. Stanton, I was entirely convinced that
if placed at the head of the War Department he would have your plan
executed vigorously, as he fully believed it was the only means of
safety, as I did.

Mr. Lincoln, on my suggesting Stanton, asked me how the leading
Republicans would take it--that Stanton was so fresh from the Buchanan
Cabinet, and so many things said of him. I insisted he was our man
withal, and brought him and Lincoln into communication, and Lincoln
was entirely satisfied; but so soon as it got out, the doubters came
to the front, Senators and Members called on me, I sent them to
Stanton and told them to decide for themselves. The gun-boats were
then nearly ready for the Mississippi expedition, and Mr. Lincoln
agreed, as soon as they were, to start the Tennessee movement. It was
determined that as soon as Mr. Stanton came in the Department, that
Col. Scott should go out to the western armies and make ready for the
campaign in pursuance of your plan, as he has testified before
committees.

It was a great work to get the matter started; you have no idea of it.
We almost fought for it. If ever there was a righteous claim on earth,
you have one. I have often been sorry that, knowing all this, as I did
then, I had not publicly declared you as the author. But we were fully
alive to the importance of absolute secrecy. I trusted but few of our
people; but to pacify the country, I announced from the Senate that
the armies were about to move, and inaction was no longer to be
tolerated, and Mr. Fessenden, head of the Finance Committee, who had
been told of the proposed advance, also stated in the Senate that what
would be achieved in a few more days would satisfy the country and
astound the world.

As the expedition advanced, Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Stanton, and myself,
frequently alluded to your extraordinary sagacity and unselfish
patriotism, but all agreed that you should be recognized for your most
noble service, and properly rewarded for the same. The last time I saw
Mr. Stanton he was on his death-bed; he was then most earnest in his
desire to have you come before Congress, as I told you soon after,
and said if he lived he would see that justice was awarded you. This I
have told you often since, and I believe the truth in this matter will
finally prevail.

B. F. WADE.


FROM HON. ELISHA WHITTLESEY.

_Found among his private papers, and transmitted to Miss Carroll in
1874._

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE, }
_February 20, 1862_. }

This will accompany copies of two letters written by Miss Anna Ella
Carroll to the War Department.

Having informed me of the contents of the letters, I requested her to
permit me to copy her duplicates. When she brought them to me she
enjoined prudence in their use. They are very extraordinary papers as
verified by the result. So far as I know or believe, our unparalleled
victories on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers may be traced to her
sagacious observations and intelligence. Her views were as broad and
sagacious as the field to be occupied. In selecting the Tennessee and
Cumberland Rivers instead of the Mississippi, she set at naught the
opinions of civilians, of military and naval men.

Justice should be done her patriotic discernment. She labors for her
country and her whole country.

ELISHA WHITTLESEY.


LETTERS TO MISS CARROLL FROM HON. BENJAMIN F. WADE.

Hon. Benjamin F. Wade, who during the war was Chairman of the
Committee on the Conduct of the War, and during the last period of his
services, after the assassination of President Lincoln had elevated
Andrew Johnson to the Presidency, was acting Vice-President and
President of the Senate, was a friend of Miss Carroll. He addressed
the following letter to her in 1869, just before the close of his last
Congressional session:


WASHINGTON, _March 1, 1869_.

MISS CARROLL:--I can not take leave of my public life without
expressing my deep sense of your services to the country during the
whole period of our National troubles. Although a citizen of a State
almost unanimously disloyal and deeply sympathizing with secession,
especially the wealthy and aristocratic class of her people, to which
you belonged, yet, in the midst of such surroundings, you emancipated
your own slaves at a great sacrifice of personal interest, and with
your powerful pen defended the cause of the Union and loyalty as ably
and effectively as it has ever yet been defended.

From my position on the Committee on the Conduct of the War, I know
that some of the most successful expeditions of the war were suggested
by you, among which I might instance the expedition up the Tennessee
River.

The powerful support you gave Governor Hicks during the darkest hour
of your State's history, prompted him to take and maintain the stand
he did, and thereby saved your State from secession and consequent
ruin.

All those things, as well as your unremitted labors in the cause of
reconstruction, I doubt not, are well known and remembered by the
members of Congress at that period.

I also well know in what high estimation your services were held by
President Lincoln: and I can not leave the subject without sincerely
hoping that the Government may yet confer on you some token of
acknowledgment for all these services and sacrifices.

Very sincerely, your friend, B. F. WADE.


On the 28th of February, 1873, three years after his leaving public
life, Judge Wade addressed the following letter:


_To the Chairman of the Military Committee of the United States
Senate:_

DEAR SIR:--I have been requested to make a brief statement of what I
can recollect concerning the claim of Miss Carroll, now before
Congress.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.