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From my position as Chairman of the Committee on the Conduct
of the War, it came to my knowledge that the expedition that was
preparing, under the special direction of President Lincoln, to
descend the Mississippi River, was abandoned, and the Tennessee
expedition was adopted by the Government in pursuance of information
and a plan presented to the Secretary of War, I think the latter part
of November, 1861, by Miss Carroll. A copy of this plan was put into
my hands immediately after the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson. With
the knowledge of its author I interrogated witnesses before the
Committee to ascertain how far military men were cognizant of the
fact. Subsequently President Lincoln informed me that the merit of
this plan was due to Miss Carroll; that the transfer of the armies
from Cairo and the northern part of Kentucky to the Memphis and
Charleston Railroad was her conception, and was afterwards carried out
generally, and very much in detail, according to her suggestions.
Secretary Stanton also conversed with me on the matter, and fully
recognized Miss Carroll's service to the Union in the organization of
this campaign. Indeed, both Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Stanton, the latter
only a few weeks before his death, expressed to me their high
appreciation of this service, and all the other services she was
enabled to render the country by her influence and ability as a
writer, and they both expressed the wish that the Government would
reward her liberally for the same, in which wish I most fully concur.

B. F. WADE.


We give extracts from letters written Miss Carroll by Judge Wade,
after his retirement from public life:


JEFFERSON, OHIO, _Sept. 9, 1874_.

This Congress may be mean enough to refuse to remunerate you for your
services, but thank heaven they can not deprive you of the honor and
consciousness of having done greater and more efficient services for
the country in the time of her greatest peril than any other person in
the Republic, and a knowledge of this can not long be suppressed,
though I do not underrate the mighty powers that may be arrayed
against you.

B. F. WADE.


JEFFERSON, OHIO, _Aug. 14, 1876_.

I rejoice that you are to have the testimony in your case published by
Congress, as I can not but believe that Congress, when they have the
facts properly before them, will be shamed into doing you justice,
though late.

I fully appreciate and deeply regret the injustice done you as though
the case were my own. The country almost in her last extremity was
saved by your sagacity and unremitted labor; indeed your services were
so great that it is hard to make the world believe it. Many have been
most generously rewarded for services having no more proportion to
yours than a mole hill to a mountain--and that all this great work
should be brought about by a woman is inconceivable to vulgar minds,
but I hope and believe that justice will triumph at last.

B. F. WADE.


JEFFERSON, OHIO, _Oct. 3, 1876_.

The truth is, your services were so great that they can not be
comprehended by the ordinary capacity of our public men, and then
again your services were of such a character that they threw a shadow
over the reputation of some of our would-be great men. No doubt great
pains has been taken in the business of trying to defeat you; but it
has been an article of faith with me that truth and justice must
ultimately triumph.

Ever yours truly, B. F. WADE.


FROM REVERDY JOHNSON.

WESTMINSTER PALACE HOTEL, }
LONDON, _Nov. 29, 1875_. }

MY DEAR MISS CARROLL:--I remember very well that you were the first to
advise the campaign on the Tennessee River in November, 1861. This I
have never heard doubted, and the great events which followed it
demonstrate the value of your suggestions. That this will be
recognized by the Government sooner or later I can not doubt....

Sincerely your friend, REVERDY JOHNSON.


FROM ORESTES H. BROWNSON.

QUINCY, ILL., _Sept. 17, 1873_.

MISS A. E. CARROLL:--During the progress of the war of the rebellion,
from 1861 to 1865, I had frequent conversations with President Lincoln
and Secretary Stanton in regard to the able and efficient part you had
taken in behalf of the country, in all of which they expressed their
admiration and gratitude for the patriotic and valuable services you
had rendered the cause of the Union. In the hope that you would be
adequately recompensed by Congress....

I am your obedient servant, O. H. BROWNSON.


LETTER OF HON. THOMAS A. SCOTT TO HON. JACOB M. HOWARD, Chairman of
the Senate Military Committee upon Miss Carroll's claim for a pension
after the close of the war:

HON. JACOB M. HOWARD, UNITED STATES SENATE:--On or about the 30th
of November, 1861, Miss Carroll, as stated in her memorial,
called on me as Assistant Secretary of War, and suggested the
propriety of abandoning the expedition which was then preparing
to descend the Mississippi River, and to adopt instead the
Tennessee River, and handed me the plan of the campaign as
appended to her memorial, which plan I submitted to the Secretary
of War, and its general ideas were adopted. On my return from the
South-west in 1862, I informed Miss Carroll, as she states in her
memorial, that through the adoption of this plan, the country had
been saved millions, and that it entitled her to the kind
consideration of Congress.

THOS. A. SCOTT.

LETTER OF HON. THOMAS A. SCOTT TO HON. HENRY WILSON, Chairman of the
Military Committee, United States Senate:


PHILADELPHIA, _May 1, 1872_.

MY DEAR SIR:--I take pleasure in stating that the plan presented by
Miss Carroll, in November, 1861, for a campaign up the Tennessee River
and thence southerly, was submitted to the Secretary of War and
President. And, after Secretary Stanton's appointment, I was directed
to go to the western armies and arrange to increase their effective
force as rapidly as possible. A part of the duty assigned to me was
the organization and consolidation into regiments of all the troops
then being recruited in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan, for the
purpose of carrying through _this campaign_, then inaugurated.

This work was vigorously prosecuted by the army, and as the valuable
suggestions of Miss Carroll, made to the Department some months
before, _were substantially carried out through the campaigns in that
section_, great successes followed, and the country was largely
benefited in the saving of time and expenditure.

I hope Congress will reward Miss Carroll liberally for her patriotic
efforts and services.

Very truly yours, THOMAS A. SCOTT.

HON. HENRY WILSON,
_Chairman of the Military Committee, United States Senate_.


LETTER FROM HON. THOMAS A. SCOTT TO MRS. GAGE.

NO. 233 SOUTH FOURTH ST., }
PHILADELPHIA, _Mar. 29, 1880_. }

DEAR MADAM:--I have your letter of March 25th in regard to Miss
Carroll's matter, and beg to say in reply that I do not know whether
the old papers are on file in the War Department or not; I presume the
only way to ascertain would be to apply to the Department direct. I
have done all that I feel I can do in this matter, having given my
evidence before the Committee in the most concise and direct form
possible. I hope that Congress will do something for Miss Carroll, but
with their present economical habits, I doubt very much whether they
will.

Hoping that the Committee in charge of the matter may have success,

I am, very truly yours, THOMAS A. SCOTT.


Editorial from the _National Citizen_ (Syracuse, N. Y.), September,
1881:

THE CONTRAST.--"Look on this picture and on that." While President
James A. Garfield lay dying, another American citizen, one to whom the
country owes far more than it did to him, was stricken with an
incurable disease. But in this case no telegram heralded the fact; no
messages were cabled abroad; few newspapers made comment, and yet had
it not been for the wisdom of this person whom the country forgets, we
should have possessed no country to-day.

Anna Ella Carroll lies at her home near Baltimore, stricken with
paralysis--perhaps already beyond the river. As the readers of the
_National Citizen_ well know, when the nation was in its hour of
extreme peril, with a nearly depleted treasury, with England and
France waiting with large fleets for a few more evil days in order to
raise the blockade, with President, Congress, and people nearly
helpless and despairing, there arose this woman, who with strategic
science far in advance of any military or naval officer on land or
sea, pointed out the way to victory, sending her plans and maps to the
War Department, which adopted them. Thus the tide of battle was
turned, victory perched on the Union banner, and in accordance with
the President's proclamation, the country united in a day of public
thanksgiving.

But that woman never received recognition from the country for her
services. The Military Committee of various Congresses has reported in
her favor, but no bill securing her even a pension has ever been
passed, and now she is dying or dead.

In another column will be found the report of the Military Committee
of the Forty-sixth Congress, in her favor, March, 1881, which as a
matter of important history we give in full, hoping no reader will
pass it by.



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