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Under the circumstances we shall be pardoned for giving an
extract from a letter of Miss Carroll to the editor of the _National
Citizen_, accompanied by a copy of this report.

Miss Carroll says: "I am sure you retain your kind interest in the
matter, and will be gratified by the last action of Congress, which is
a complete recognition of my public service, on the part of military
men; both Confederate and Union brigadiers belonging to the Military
Committee."

While this bill was in no sense commensurable with the services
rendered by Miss Carroll to the country, yet as the main point was
conceded, it was believed it would secure one more consonant with
justice at the next session of Congress.

The nation is mourning Garfield with the adulation generally given
monarchs; General Grant is decorating his New York "palace" with
countless costly gifts from home and abroad; yet a greater than both
has fallen, and _because she was a woman_, she has gone to her great
reward on high, unrecognized and unrewarded by the country she saved.
Had it not been for her work, the names of James A. Garfield and of
Ulysses S. Grant would never have emerged from obscurity. Women,
remember that to one of your own sex the salvation of the country is
due, and never forget to hold deep in your hearts, and to train your
children to hold with reverence the name of ANNA ELLA CARROLL.

* * * * *


WOMEN AS SOLDIERS.

A FEMALE SOLDIER.

There is a female here appealing for five months' back pay due her as
a soldier in the army. Her name is Mary E. Wise. She is an orphan,
without a blood relative in the world, and was a resident of Jefferson
Township, Huntington County, Indiana, where she enlisted in the 34th
Indiana Volunteers under the name of William Wise. She served two
years and eighteen days as a private, participating in six of the
heaviest engagements in the West, was wounded at Chicamauga and
Lookout Mountain, at the latter place severely in the side. Upon the
discovery of her sex, through her last wound, she was sent to her home
in Indiana. When she arrived there, her step-mother refused her
shelter, or to assist her in any way. Having five months' pay due from
the Government, she started for Washington, in the hope of collecting
it, arriving in this city on the 4th instant. Here her troubles have
only increased. She can not get her pay. Her colonel probably, under
the circumstances, not deeming it necessary, failed to give her a
proper or formal discharge, with the necessary papers. In her
difficulties she has, repeatedly, endeavored to refer her case to the
President, but, not having influential friends to back her, she has
been disappointed in all her efforts to see him, and the Department
can pay her only upon proper or formal discharge papers, etc. So she
is here, without friends or means, wholly dependent upon the bounty of
the Sanitary Commission.


NATIONAL FREEDMAN'S AID ASSOCIATION.

JOSEPHINE S. GRIFFING.

WASHINGTON, _April 15, 1870_.

LUCRETIA MOTT--MY DEAR FRIEND:--Feeling that the exact condition of
the worn-out slaves now in this District could be better understood by
a little explanation that I can make, and knowing that you desire the
truth in this matter of life-long interest to you, I desire to refer
to the following facts, which I trust you will present to the meeting
of Friends (Quakers) in Philadelphia who sympathize with you.

In the year 1864, when urging upon Senator Sumner and our friends in
Congress, the necessity of a bureau that could afford special aid to
the emancipated slaves, the great fact that the old people were
suddenly turned out of the possibility of a subsistence, was
recognized by all. Mr. Sumner, in his first speech putting the bill in
passage, urged this as sufficient ground alone, if no other existed,
which was not the case. From the time of the organization of the
Bureau till now, their special claim has been recognized by Congress,
and notwithstanding they received, in common with all the freed people
of this District, an allowance made to each in rations, blankets,
clothes, fuel, Government buildings, medical treatment, and monthly
visitation; they also have each year received from Congress special
aid in an appropriation because of their age and infirmity, many of
them being helpless as infants, and all too far spent in slavery to
labor for a support.

In providing for the able-bodied freed people, only partial support
was intended by the Bureau, to bridge over the transition from slavery
to freedom. Then education and the ballot, added to their own
industrial resources, came in, and furnished them a basis for
self-support and citizenship. The Bureau was no longer a necessary
department in the Government for THIS CLASS, and was abolished,
without a substitute for the aged and worn-out slaves, though they
were now older and more infirm, and had lost in this change houses,
food, fuel, clothing, medical treatment, and, excepting myself,
visiting agents.

Since the discontinuance of the Bureau, I have acted, as before its
creation, as "best friend" and as agent of the National Freedman's
Relief Association of this District, in the care of the old, crippled,
blind, and broken-down, of whom I have at this time in number _eleven
hundred_, not one of whom is able to earn for himself the necessaries
of life. At this moment, at least one hundred and fifty broken-down
slaves are at this office, covering all the porches, sitting on all
the stairs, forming an almost impassable barrier to the entrances--all
with a story of want in their _faces_; in fact of want, from "the
crown of the head to the sole of the half-naked feet," and all eager
to say, "We has nobody to go 'pon." An old woman ninety-one, sat on
the steps just after the sun rose this morning, so _tired_, she looked
a pitying sight for angels. "Can you let me stay anywhere?" she said.
"I'se had no home dis winter; dey let me stay in de wash-room last
night, but der wasn't any blanket, and 'pears I got chilled through."
Upon investigation I found it was true she had no friend or relative,
and had been going on the outskirts of the city begging among the
colored people (poor as herself, except in shelter) _a lodging_, and
often doing with almost nothing to eat for two or three days at a
time. Perfectly disabled for life by weakness (so common among the old
women of slavery) and the infirmities of ninety years of hard life.
Through the noble efforts of Rachel W. M. Townsend in behalf of these
poor human beings, I was able to give her a bedtick and twenty-five
cents for straw to fill it, a comforter, and a place to stay in the
house with two others of the same class, for whom we have all winter
paid rental. What less than _this_ would the loving Saviour of men
have done for one like her? What less would _you_, who have battled
half a century for her freedom, have done in a case like that? She has
now a bed and comforter, _no pillow_, nor bedstead, and _not one_
garment to change with the ragged and filthy ones that have served for
day and night apparel, for bed and outdoor wrappings, the last three
months. She has no resource for bread, _in herself_, and none but God
to whom she can say, "Give" me "this day" my "daily bread". This woman
represents at least two hundred persons in every way as destitute, who
look to me for help. Another class of two hundred are in a similar
state of destitution, with this exception, they are sheltered by a
fellow-servant or distant relative, and sometimes furnished a bed, but
nothing more, and none of these can _labor_.

Two hundred more are equally destitute and as helpless, many of them
as young children, needing the personal care that patients in our
hospitals do, not excepting medical treatment and bathing. Add to
these five hundred, who under the most favorable circumstances _may_,
though do not generally, furnish their bread three months in the
summer, by picking up bones and rags in the alleys and gutters, I
believe I may safely say that out of the eleven hundred there are not
one hundred who can do this, and pay _house-rent_ beside. And it must
be remembered that none of these old people own a foot of ground in
the city, or have a home they can call their own. A few of these only
live with children, some of whom are also very old. Fanny Miner, one
hundred and thirteen, lives with a daughter seventy-two. William
Dennis, ninety-nine, lives with a daughter seventy-four. Anna Sauxter,
one hundred and one, with a consumptive son of sixty, and has slept on
an old table through the winter _watching_, as she says, two days and
a night at one time, _with no food at all_. She was one of the slaves
of Washington. Anna Ferguson, another of his slaves, emancipated when
young, lives in a wretched garret, and has no one to give her a cup of
water. She sent a child to me to-day, who said she went in to borrow
some fire of "old auntie," and found her very sick, groaning with
dreadful pain, with the message that she was perishing for something
to eat; could I send her an Irish potato? She added in her message,
"Tell her to come and see me, I'll not be here long."

I have just now returned from a visit on "the Island," where I have
seen twenty-seven of these helpless persons, a few cases of which
(could you see them) would leave no doubt in your mind in reference to
the necessity of a change from the present state of things. I saw
enough in this visit to fill a book, and could tongue or pen describe
it--to convince the mind of a savage--of terrible inhumanity and lack
of all charity. The morning was sunny and clear, and old Aunt Clara
and Uncle John sat on broken chairs, under the rude perch of a
miserable shanty. He, tall and athletic, his long white beard and
snow-white head, impressive as the type of venerable age, was putting
Aunt Clara's foot into a soft shoe as carefully as though it was the
last time it could be dressed. She 74, neat and velvet-faced, was
stone blind, and so paralyzed that the slightest touch on the arm or
hand made her spring and cry like a child.



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