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STEBBINS.

Emily Robinson, of Salem, Ohio, writes me that Mrs. Griffing "was for
several years the honored, loved, and trusted agent of the Western
Anti-Slavery Society. The fact is indelibly graven on my heart that
she was one of the most faithful and indefatigable laborers in the
Anti-Slavery cause; she brought a great mother-heart to the work.
Under fearful discouragement, she was ever strong and persevering. I
do hope that you knew her, even better than I did, and that the
history will be a success. Be sure of my heartiest and kindliest
sympathy. It is a beautiful work--the effort to preserve and embalm
the memories of the sweet-souled moral heroes in special reforms,
those in which we have been pioneers, though scores go out of life
without, in the book of God's remembrance they are gathered, and their
work will bear harvest forever and ever."

Mrs. Griffing's daughter says in a letter: "Mother lived till Feb. 18,
1872, and no one can ever know how faithfully she worked for every one
but herself. Her very last words were, as she dropped her tired arms
by her side, 'I have done the best I could,' and we knew she had."

DEATH OF MRS. JOSEPHINE S. GRIFFING.--Yesterday morning, at two
o'clock, Mrs. Josephine S. Griffing departed to a higher life. A woman
of rare beauty of character, of uncommon executive capacity and
judgment, and ever inspired by a beautiful and self-sacrificing
charity, she had warm friends among the best men and women, eminent in
character, influence, and position, and a host of devoted friends also
among the poor and aged freed people, to whom for years she has been a
daily angel of mercy. Accomplished and cultivated, she has devoted
herself to the wants of the poorest of the poor, visiting their homes
and ministering to their wants with her own hands. She has disbursed
many thousands of dollars and a large amount of food and clothing
furnished by the Government and by private benevolence, and done all
wisely and well and for long periods of time without material fee or
reward.

Rarely, indeed, do we find such tender charity, such ability for
continuous labor, and such spiritual beauty of life as hers, and
her departure is no doubt the result of her too severe and
self-sacrificing career of good works.

From 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. to-day the remains may be seen by her many
friends at her late home, on Capitol Hill, and to-night her daughters
go with all that is mortal of a most tender and loving mother to the
family burial-place in her native town of Hebron, Conn.--_Washington
Chronicle._


MRS. GRIFFING TO CATHARINE F. STEBBINS.

WASHINGTON, _June 27, 1870_.

MY DEAR MRS. STEBBINS:--Yours so kind and interesting came duly, and I
thank you. I am sure you have seen how some _genius_, greater, more
powerful than myself control me and forbids me to seek enjoyment in
human friendships. If you comprehend my life, you will pardon long
silence of the _lips_, and join me in the prayer, that the poor all
taken into "Abraham's bosom," I may _enjoy_ those I love, in heaven. I
am pained when I think that not only _you_, but my dear father in his
affliction, has been neglected, for it is now four long weeks since I
have written a word of love and consolation to him. But the days are
so full of work, and the nights of thinking, that all my vitality
seems to be in requisition, and I sometimes think there is no reserve
force left in me. Oh, how I wish our Christianity would be true to
itself, and take to its heart the great questions of humanity, then
would I turn over a precious few of the starving old people now
calling upon God and me for their support, to churches, and enter the
field for woman.

How grandly the tide is lashing the shore on both sides of the
Atlantic, and its voice is the voice of God, commanding once more that
ye "let my people go, that they may serve me." Only the foam and the
surge are seen to-day--"Woman and the Ballot." But there is
overturning and upheaving below, and the great depths shall ere long
become the surface, and what is now seen in the social realm and
believed in, as a _religious creed_, must enter into the formation,
geologically conforming to fossilization and decay; so the last shall
be first, and the first last. The last half century is a grand
prophecy. How _slavery_ went down, carrying away social and religious
systems with it! There they lie, like dust and ashes in the rear. None
are found so poor and benighted as to do homage at their shrine. It
was the moral agitation that gave spiritual birth to the race
enslaved. I remember to have felt great impatience at the tardy and
conservative elements that entered into the struggle side by side with
the radical leaders of 1845, when to me the issue was not with the
Constitution, nor even with the pulpit, nor the Bible, but with
Justice. It was man to man, stripped of all but the Divine within him.
The lessons of moral and political formation in its slow but certain
work, come to strengthen me now. To my mind the issue of to-day in the
woman cause is clearly not what Paul taught and thought, nor what God
has settled upon her as her dower, nor what the marriage contract
makes her, but it is woman as a beneficent genius, next to the angels,
against woman below the beasts, in human society under the heel of the
Law, in the arms of brute force, crushed to death with passion and
lust. Lucy Stone has made it obvious to the world that six plates, six
teacups and saucers, and a guardian for her children, at the time of
her husband's death, are not her only legitimate property. Mrs.
Stanton goes further, and declares that not alone is her property
sacred, and must be restored to her, but that _personal freedom_,
subject to the Moral Law, not to the law of Society, nor of
Government, if those powers contravene or interfere with God's Law as
it is written in her own constitution.

In so much as woman is endowed by the Creator with the most loving and
beneficent genius or nature capable of enduring the agonies of many
deaths, to give life to many souls, in so much she is entitled to
command, not left to obey. So says Mrs. Stanton; I agree with her.
Both Lucy Stone and Mrs. Stanton are skilled workmen. Both
representative women; representing the two wings in the cause of
woman's freedom.

You speak of Mrs. Stanton's view in the McFarland-Richardson case. I
knew but little of the real character of Mrs. Richardson, but if what
is acknowledged to be true of his,--I do agree with Mrs. S. in
declaring this case a forcible argument--not against _marriage_,--such
a thing can not be--but against the marriage _contract_, as
interpreted in the courts. What a burlesque upon insanity! Poor Minnie
Gaines, the colored girl who shot her seducer the other day, in my
neighborhood, was cleared upon as doubtful insanity as McFarland's,
and she enjoys the benefit of the doubt in the insane asylum, where
she will remain unquestionably for a term of years; why does this _man
"go at large"_? Neither of the Associations, nor journals, are ready
to assume the high ground that Mrs. Stanton standing alone and
leading, as she always has on this question, can and will do. With all
my heart, I pray that true women and the angels will stand by and
sustain her in this noble daring.

Our work (the Freedman's work) is as usual, every day painfully
interesting and compensating. _No money comes yet_, and I have to
raise some $2,000 soon, or lose our delightful home. (Yes, it is
delightful). We have a bad city government, the colored people begin
to feel the old rebel spirit. Hundreds thrown out of work, and I have
nothing to hope from the City Council to compensate for my work. Some
good friend said a few days since, that Congress would, if persons of
influence would ask it, pay me. Now would Mr. Ward with Mr. Wade, do
this, and so let me breathe and live? or not?

We can not go out of the city this summer. You will be in Philadelphia
at the Decade meeting I hope, and I shall rejoice to be there too. You
see the Peace Society is in "hot water" over the McFarland-Richardson
discussion in the _Band of Peace_.

Thermometer stood at 107 yesterday, and very hot to-day. Write when
you can, and believe me ever your attached friend,

J. S. GRIFFING.

* * * * *


THE WOMAN'S LOYAL LEAGUE.

LETTERS IN RESPONSE TO THE CALL FOR MEETING OF THE LOYAL WOMEN OF THE
COUNTRY.

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

HAMPTON, N. H., _May 4, 1863_.

MISS ANTHONY--DEAR MADAM:--I cheerfully respond to the call, published
in _The Liberator_, to the loyal women of the North, to meet on the
14th inst. I am sensible that you will have responses from many whose
words will be more potent, and who can do braver deeds than I can do.
But I want to add my feeble testimony, notwithstanding, to encourage
this first effort of American women, in a national capacity, to
sustain the Government, and help guide it through the perils which
threaten its existence, thus demonstrating not only their loyalty, but
their ability to understand its genius; the quickness of their
perception of the cause and also of the remedies of the dangers which
imperil the nation; and also their fitness to be admitted to take part
in its deliberations. Not long since, men here at the North--loyal
men--men who were not in favor of slavery, denied that they had any
responsibility in regard to its existence. Marvelous, that they could
not see that slavery is a moral pestilence, poisoning all the
fountains of society, spreading infections over all the nation. Now
the war teaches them that they have a responsibility, and that it
would have been better had they seen it earlier. The right to take any
responsibility in regard to it was denied to woman; it was out of her
sphere; it ran into politics, which were unfit for woman, and into
governmental affairs, which she was supposed incompetent to
comprehend. But this painful hour of warfare crowds home upon us the
conviction that woman's interests equally with man's are
imperiled--private as well as public, individual as well as social.
She must not only consent to the sacrifice of husbands and sons
falling in their blood on the enemy's ground; but failing to conquer
them there, these enemies are eager to change the scene of action,
transfer the battle-field to our own doors, spread death and
devastation, and then establish slavery as a legacy to us.



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