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THOMAS.
RICHMOND, Ind., May 11, 1863.


PECOR, WABASH VALLEY, IND.

To the "Call for a meeting of the Loyal Women of the Nation," we most
heartily respond. It is precisely what is needed at this time. There
is a lack of enthusiasm here as elsewhere--not that our "Aid
Societies" are not quite flourishing: but that we do after the manner
of Miss Ophelia, "from a sense of duty." A lady says to me, "What more
can be expected of women if men fail to some extent in our military
affairs?" Well, they can arouse the smouldering fires of patriotism,
help to raise the trailing banner, and stand devotedly by the dear old
flag. If they enter into the work heart and soul, good results will
follow. There is here a strong secession element; copperheads abound;
the sky looks dark and threatening; but Gov. Morton's vigorous policy
and Gen. Burnside's "Order No. 38," will show the traitors that we
have a government--a strong one, too--that will bring them straight up
to the mark.

Those who are disposed to criticise your meeting, who have a word to
say about women taking part in political or public affairs, should
have their memories refreshed a little. From a great many who have
ruled in affairs of State, I select one who lived a long time ago. The
record is from the highest authority. Deborah, the wife of Lapidoth,
who judged Israel, had her canopy of State under the palm-tree in
Mount Ephraim. At this time the children of Egypt had been mightily
oppressed for twenty years by Jabin, King of Canaan. Hope is almost
extinguished in Israel; not one man scarcely seems awake to his
country's wrongs; patriotism is slumbering in every manly breast, yet
glows brightly in the heart of woman; and as the tribunal of judgment
is deserted by manly virtue, ability, and zeal, Deborah takes the
place, not by usurpation, but divine appointment. She instructs the
people in the law and testimony of the living God, and inspires them
with more than a common enthusiasm to go with Barak against the mighty
host of Canaan. They go forth, and are victorious, completely routing
the enemy. Sisera, the commander-in-chief of the great army of Jabin,
is slain by the hand of woman! The mighty arm of the Lord of Hosts is
seen in this conflict, for JEHOVAH HAS NO ATTRIBUTE THAT WILL TAKE
SIDES WITH THE OPPRESSOR!

Would it not be well for the women of to-day to emulate Deborah in her
zeal and love of country? I trust your meeting will be productive of
great good in arousing us to more correct views of our duties and
responsibilities as members of the Republic. As Burke says, "_I love
agitation when there is a cause for it_." The alarm-bell which
startles the inhabitants of a city from their midnight slumbers, saves
them from destruction.

May 11, 1863. Truly yours, ELIZA B. TERRELL.


E. M. WILKINSON, on behalf of the Soldiers' Aid Society in Laporte
County, Ind., writes:

"We will labor with all our might, mind, and strength for a free
country, where there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary
servitude. As our mothers stood by the Government in the Revolution,
so we, like them, will stand by the present Administration. We believe
the sin of slavery to be the cause of this horrid war, therefore we
hailed with gladness the ninth section of the Confiscation law, and
the Proclamation of Freedom by the President."


ILLINOIS.

ROSEMOND, CHRISTIAN COUNTY, ILL., _May 5, 1863_.

MISS SUSAN B. ANTHONY--_My Dear Christian Friend:_--I observed with
deep interest, in _The Independent_ of April 16th, an article on
"Women and the War," stating that meetings would be held in your city
on the 14th of May, "to consider how woman's services may be more
effectually engaged in promoting the war, supporting the Government,
and advancing the cause of Freedom and the Union."

At that meeting I shall be most cordially present in _spirit_, while I
am necessarily in body far from you; and for the result of your
deliberations there I shall watch with eager interest. _What can woman
do?_ has been with me from the beginning of this war a question of the
uppermost importance. I have asked it with tears again and again, and
have watched every intimation upon this point in our journals, and
from soldier friends, with a willing heart and ready hand; though I
have sometimes observed with pain, that those who had given least for
this great cause were least solicitous on this question, and less
disposed to do, and to continue to do, than those very ones who, as
they would say, had surely done enough, when they had given up husband
or son, father or brother, or all of these, for the bloody conflict.
But no, it is those who like me have given up their all, and perhaps
like me are left by this war widowed and alone, helpless and in feeble
health; such it is that cry, What can woman yet do for this sacred
cause? Such may silently bear their lonely anxiety and sorrow,
patiently toil and struggle to take care of themselves, and of those
dependent upon them, as best they can, uncomplaining, asking not aid
or sympathy, and all the while cheering their beloved ones yet spared
in the conflict, and holding up their hands by words of encouragement
and blessing. But such can not sit still, and feel that they have done
enough. Such can not look with indifference upon the flowing tide of
blood all around us; upon the thousands of hearths and homes as
desolate as their own; upon the hardships and sufferings of our brave
soldiers in field, or hospital, or camp; upon the hundreds of
thousands of those poor freedmen, women and children, that have just
begun to emerge from the house of their bondage, and come out empty,
ignorant, and degraded, yet seeking liberty, protection, instruction,
and offering their strong right arms for the defense of that wise and
beneficent Government that has bid them go free. Methinks, every
mother and every teacher should now take special care to instill into
the minds of those committed to their instruction a holy and devoted
patriotism; the sacred principles of liberty; liberty for all; the
inestimable value of our free institutions; and the perpetuation of
these as an end worthy of their highest ambition. Teach them to honor
the name of soldier, and to cherish sacredly the memory of those who
have given their life's blood for the cementing and maintenance of
this Union, and to be ready to stand up bravely for the right, when
their turn may come.

I have written from the fullness of my heart, yet in much weakness and
sorrow. My own beloved and noble husband was among the very first to
offer his services at his country's call, and in less than one short
year his sacrifice was owned of God, to whom he had early consecrated
his life, and from the strife of the battle-field (at Donelson, in
February, 1862) he was called up higher to rest in peace. In feeble
health, I have returned to the asylum of a father's house, to which
one beloved brother has just returned with his discharge, having
wasted nearly to a skeleton in Southern hospitals, and two brothers
are yet in the army. Should you have any printed circular of the
result of your meetings, a copy would be very gratefully received; and
if there is any way in which ladies at so great a distance can
co-operate with you, in measures you may devise, you may be sure that
this little town of Rosemond will furnish her full share of loyal
women. I will almost venture to say, no other can be found here.

In behalf of all that makes our country

"The land of the free and the home of the brave,"

I am, yours very cordially, E. P. WEEKS.


AURORA, ILL., _May 8, 1863_.

There never was a time in the world's history when the strength and
efforts of women, as well as men, were so imperatively demanded as
now. Never before in the annals of time has there been a struggle of
such momentous import, not only at home, but abroad, as this. The eye
of every principality and power on the face of the earth is upon us,
anxiously watching and awaiting the success or defeat of our armies to
prove or disprove the practicability of a republican form of
government. Let us work for the right and true

"All we can,
Every woman, every man."

For Freedom and Union, ELLEN BEARD HARMAN.


WASHINGTON, TAZEWELL COUNTY, ILL., _May 12, 1863_.

LADIES:--Quickened by a call from our national metropolis, and
prompted by the same loyalty that issued the call, a few of the women
of this place have organized themselves into a Union League, for the
maintenance of our Government and the encouragement and succor of our
soldiers in the field. Our organization occurred too late, we fear, to
enable us to report ourselves to the National Committee at the
appointed meeting; but having opened, we propose to go forward,
soliciting the co-operation of every individual woman of the place, so
long as our Government is in peril and rebellion utters its voice in
the nation.

Yours in the same cause,

MRS. S. W. FISH, Sec'y. MRS. H. N. KELLOGG, Pres't.


ASBURY, LASALLE COUNTY, ILL., _May 8, 1863_.

MADAM ANTHONY:--I call myself a loyal woman, and am glad that there is
about to be made some extra effort by woman for the strengthening and
upholding of our common Government in this present rebellion. For my
own part, I should rather work hard and fare poor for a number of
years, that the Government may have a share of my industry, than that
we fail in this present war. Drops form the ocean; and if we all can
be made to feel the greatness of small things added together, we can
present a truly strengthening arm in this struggle; and I would
suggest that we all lay aside our vanity and love of extravagance in
dress, and save the money from some of our intended purchases for a
war fund. Almost every person can spare five, ten, or twenty dollars.
Let some one take the lead in every city and village by stimulating
the people to a little self-denial, and I think we can raise a grand
sum, to be applied where it is most needed.



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