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Just set this ball in
motion in New York, and it may roll all over the North.

I do not wonder that woman lacks enthusiasm in matters of Government,
for our laws, though they may be nearly just to white men, are very
oppressive to women, particularly those that deprive married women of
the right to hold property and do business themselves. I think that
man and woman both would live more happily if the laws were more
equal; but as they are, they are a shame to this enlightened age. They
make a married woman a beggar all her life, although she may have a
rich husband, and a most pitiable one, if he is poor. Wipe out the law
entirely that gives us a third of our husband's property; we can make
better bargains than that ourselves with our husbands. The one-third
law does us not a mite of good, unless our husband dies, and we do not
all of us want to part with them, although the laws do make them our
oppressors. But notwithstanding the mean position that we are
compelled to occupy, I feel like upholding the Government as the best
that is, feeling quite sure that the kindness and good sense of our
rulers will give us something a little more like justice after a
while.

MARIAM H. FISH


WISCONSIN.

_To the Meeting of Loyal Women in the City of New York, Greeting:_

It is now nearly three months since the loyal women of Madison, Wis.,
desiring to express their equal interest in the preservation of the
Union and Government, and their abhorrence of all who by word and deed
encourage the unholy rebellion which has filled our land with
mourning, organized the first Ladies' Union League in the country, and
pledged themselves, during the continuance of the war, to such
individual persistent effort and self-sacrifice as should prove to our
soldiers and their families that we have made common cause with them.
Without delay we issued our preamble and constitution in the form of a
circular-letter, inviting the co-operation of all loyal women of the
State in the formation of similar organizations. Copies of this
circular, inviting a full expression of feeling, and statement of
cases of individual necessity, were sent to every company of infantry,
artillery, and cavalry that have gone from the State; and the most
gratifying letters from the army have proved the value which they put
upon our efforts. We organized visiting committees, renewed every
week, who examine into and report upon all cases of want in soldiers'
families, many of whom have been cared for and relieved through the
agency of these committees, thus obviating one of the most productive
causes of discontent in the army. The ignorant woman who does not know
what are the proper steps to take in securing her bounty, allotment,
and pension; the discouraged wife who hears the low murmurs of treason
to the Government on every side, whose appeals to her soldier in the
field increase when they do not create the same feeling, are alike the
objects of our care.

In addition to, and of more importance even than these home efforts,
are those we make in encouraging the soldiers by correspondence. Does
some officer distinguish himself by an act of personal bravery in the
army of the West? we save the newspaper notices, cut these out, and
inclose them, with a few hearty, earnest words, to some member of the
army of the Potomac, and thus become a medium for the diffusion of all
that can stimulate and inspire courage and loyalty.

We have deemed this brief statement of our organization and mode of
operation the best expression of our sympathy with your meeting. We
joyfully hail the formation of such associations in the great centers
of influence, and believe that a cause to which the women of the
country as _one soul_ devote their time, their energies, and all they
love best, will stand vindicated as the cause of God, of justice and
humanity, before the whole world.

MRS. W. A. P. MORRIS, _President_.
MRS. E. S. CARR, _Secretary_.
MADISON, WIS., _May 9, 1863_.


CASSVILLE, WIS., _May 4, 1863_.

Lately noticing in the _New York Tribune_ a call for a meeting of the
loyal women of this nation, and believing woman as responsible for its
destiny as man, I feel it my duty to make known to you my most sincere
wishes for its success. As loyal women, and being under so much
responsibility, it seems necessary that some effort should be made to
exchange our views and form resolutions on this subject. Let us
remember then our duty; let us unite ourselves by associations, that
we may act in concert in our country's cause. We must not forget that
knowledge is power, and that the minds of this country are molded and
governed by the press; let us therefore, in whatever sphere we move,
aid and encourage the reading and circulation of loyal newspapers and
public speakers of both sexes that labor for our country (the best
diplomatists of Europe have confessed that the State papers of the
Revolution did almost, if not quite as much, for us as our soldiery);
and let us at the same time discountenance all disloyal reading, all
disloyal sentiments, and all disloyal persons of whatever standing or
relation, and let our object be our country, our whole country, and
nothing but our country.

MRS. URSULA LARNED.


BARABOO, WIS., _May 11, 1863_.

SUSAN B. ANTHONY--_Dear Madam:_--I can not tell you with what joy I
received through the _Anti-Slavery Standard_ the account of the
formation of the "Loyal Women's League of Hartford, Ct." I forthwith
communicated with the women met for sanitary purposes, and we
organized a "Loyal Women's League" here. Forty women signed at once,
and others now are constantly added. All over this region the women
seem to be waiting, longing for some soul to animate the body of work
with which we have been so long and lovingly busying ourselves. We
shall do what we can to encourage and inspire our soldiers, to comfort
and cheer their families, and to make our influence tell on the right
side at home and wherever it is felt. Our organization is auxiliary to
the Madison League. We have adopted mainly their Constitution. We
would be glad to be represented in person in the National Convention,
where the true woman's heart of the nation will utter itself; but this
may not be so. We send you this our pledge. The bells are ringing and
guns firing for joy for our military victories. Thank God for them.
But our woman's work of educating the children into the idea and
practice of true and universal justice is ever to be done. Oh that we
may be wise and faithful In our work, till our priceless heritage of
liberty be enjoyed by every human being in our land.

Cordially yours, MARIA P. CODDING.


IOWA.

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA.

Most gladly does my heart respond to the call, and most earnestly do I
hope that the deliberations on that occasion will result in much good
to women and to the cause you meet to promote. The women of the North
are charged by the press with a lack of zeal and enthusiasm in the
war. This charge may be true to some extent. Though for the most part
they are loyal to their Government, and in favor of sustaining its
every measure for putting down the rebellion; yet they do not, I fear,
enter fully into the spirit of the women of the Revolution. There are
many women in whose hearts the love of country and of justice is
strong, and who are willing to incur any loss, and make almost any
sacrifice, rather than the rebellion should succeed and the chains of
the bondman be more firmly rivetted. If they manifest less enthusiasm
than their patriotic brothers, it is because they have not so great
opportunity for its exercise. The customs of society do not permit any
strong or noisy demonstration of feeling on the part of woman; but the
blood of Revolutionary sires flows as purely in her veins, and she can
feel as deeply, suffer as intensely, and endure as bravely as her more
favored brothers. But I would have her do more than suffer and endure;
I would that she should not only resolve to stand by the Government in
its work of defeating the schemes of its enemies, but that she should
let her voice go forth in clear and unmistakable tones against any
peace with rebels, except upon the basis of entire submission to the
authority of the Government. Against the schemes and plans of the
Peace party in the North, let loyal women everywhere protest. That
your deliberations may be characterized by good judgment, sound
wisdom, and true patriotism, is my heartfelt prayer.

AMELIA BLOOMER.


MINNESOTA.

HOKAH, HOUSTON CO., MINN., _May 13, 1863_.

To SUSAN B. ANTHONY--_Dear Madam:_-- ... While the women of the South,
with a heroism and self-denial worthy a better cause, have no doubt
aided in fanning the flame of rebellion, it appears to me eminently
proper that the loyal women of the North should meet in council to
express their sentiments in regard to the great principles of humanity
and justice. Many of us have sons and brothers on the tented field,
and while we deplore the stern necessity that drew them from the
endearments of home; while we tremble with anxiety lest the mournful
tidings that have saddened so many hearts should fall with crushing
weight on ourselves, a voice from the army comes to us with thrilling
earnestness that awakens with redoubled vigor the feeling of
patriotism within us. Our noble soldiery are taking a stand on the
broad platform of universal liberty and justice. With scathing words
they have rebuked the traitors in our midst; and they now breathe out
threatenings and slaughter to the _miscreants_ who would rend the fair
heritage transmitted to us by the heroes of the Revolution.

May every patriotic woman in the land do her utmost to uphold and
strengthen the holy purpose that inspires the loyal heart of the army.
For myself, I regard no sacrifice too great that will conduct to the
comfort of the brave men who are risking life and limb in the sacred
cause of freedom; and I am proud to say that this is the sentiment of
every lady within the circle of my acquaintance.



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