A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
With new phases of society new
terms come into vogue. We have now, springing up everywhere, Loyal
National Leagues, and great good they are doing. They have, so far,
been chiefly set on foot by men, but women are now bestirring
themselves in the same direction. Quite recently, a Woman's Loyal
National League has been organized in this city....

The prudence of the members of this League is to be commended, first,
in selecting a single object on which to concentrate their exertions,
and secondly, in selecting as that object the of procuring an act of
Congress declaring general emancipation, than which nothing is more
needed at the present time, not only as an endorsement of the
President's Proclamation, but also as a remedy for the utter confusion
produced by the present state of affairs, under which it would puzzle
the shrewdest lawyer to determine who, among the fugitives that are
daily flocking to us across the lines, is free, and who still a slave.
As a permanent arrangement, no one believes that a few counties in one
State, and a few parishes in another, can remain slave, while all
around them emancipation has been accomplished; nor that slavery can
endure, except for a brief season, along a narrow border-strip,
bounded North and South by freedom.

Whether these ladies will succeed in the task of procuring _one
million_ of names to their petition, depends chiefly on their business
talent in organizing the machinery of so great an undertaking. R.

_The New York Evening Post_ says:


AN IMPORTANT UNDERTAKING.

It has sometimes been made a reproach to the women of the Northern
States, that while their sisters of the South are the very life of the
rebellion, exceeding the men in zeal and devotion and self-sacrifice,
they, with a noble cause against a base one, show less zeal, less
earnestness, do less to animate and inspire the combatants; in short,
are less active in maintaining the Union than the ladies of the Slave
States in working to destroy it.

If, however, the members of the "Women's Loyal National League," an
association recently commenced in this city, succeed in what they have
just undertaken, it will go far to show that there is neither
lukewarmness nor lack of energy in the women of the North; and that,
in practical industry exerted in aid of the war and the Government,
they are not to be outmatched by the zeal of the fair mischief-makers
who oppose both....

We learn that the League has already obtained several thousand names
and addresses of persons and societies throughout the Northern and
Border States who are favorable to emancipation, to whom they propose
to address their circulars; and that they are organizing, after a
business fashion, the machinery necessary to effect their object in
the six months still intervening before the meeting of Congress. It is
a great undertaking, this obtaining of one million signatures, such an
undertaking as has seldom if ever been carried out before. If it
succeeds it will obtain record in the history of the time as an
enterprise most honorable to the sex which conceived and completed it.

The pledge of the League is well worded and judicious....

Such Leagues ought to be, and we trust will be, organized all over the
country, in aid of the mammoth petition. Without having made any
accurate calculation, we doubt whether less than four stout men could
carry the roll comprising a million names into the House to which it
is addressed.

_The Philadelphia Press_ says:


SPIRIT OF NORTHERN WOMEN.

It is a great country, this of ours. Great events occur in it. Great
things are to be found in it. Where shall we find another Niagara?
Where a cave of dimensions equal to those of the Mammoth Cave of
Kentucky? Since California has been added we have her gigantic pines,
towering above all other trees in the world. We can not make war, but
we must carry it on upon a scale unknown since the days of Xerxes. Our
women, too, it would seem, catch the spirit of the country. Until now
they have chiefly been known, throughout the great national struggle,
in the capacity of sisters of mercy, tenders in hospitals, collectors
of comforts and of little luxuries for our sick and wounded. We find
them laboring now in a new field. They, called the weaker sex, and
properly so called, if thews and sinews constitute strength, have
undertaken to do more than to care for the sick and wounded. They seek
to aid in striking at the root of the evil whence has arisen the
strife which causes the sickness of the hospital and the wounds of the
battle-field. They have undertaken a task beyond that which the sturdy
Chartists of England performed. The Chartist Petition, if we remember
aright, had seven or eight hundred thousand names--the largest number
ever obtained to a petition. But our Northern women have undertaken to
procure _one million_ of names to a Petition for Emancipation, and to
complete their task in the next six months. The article from _The
Tribune_, elsewhere, will be read with interest.

_The National Anti-Slavery Standard_ comments:


THE WOMEN'S LOYAL LEAGUE--MAMMOTH PETITION TO CONGRESS.

The Women's Loyal National League, at a meeting held at their Room in
the Cooper Institute on Friday, the 29th ult., changed the form of
their pledge, so that it now reads as follows:

"We, the undersigned, women of the United States, agree to become
members of the 'Women's Loyal National League,' hereby pledging our
most earnest influence in support of the Government in its prosecution
of the war for freedom and for the restoration of the national unity."

This, it strikes us, is a much happier wording than that of the former
pledge....

The women of the League have embarked in an enterprise worthy of their
energy and devotion, and we will not allow ourselves to doubt that
they will meet with complete success. It will require some money and a
great deal of hard work, but their courage and patience will be found
adequate to the task. They will find a helper in every woman who loves
justice and humanity, and realizes that there can be no permanent
peace for the country until slavery is exterminated root and branch.
The moral influence upon Congress and the nation of such a petition,
signed by a MILLION of women, will be incalculable; while the
agitation attending the effort will be of the greatest benefit.

Women willing to aid in circulating the petition should send their
address at once to Susan B. Anthony, Secretary of the League, 20
Cooper Institute, New York.


OFFICE OF THE WOMEN'S LOYAL NATIONAL LEAGUE, }
Room No. 20, Cooper Institute, New York, _January 25, 1864_. }

_The Women's Loyal National League, to the Women of the Republic:_--We
ask you to sign and circulate this petition for the entire abolition
of slavery. We have now one hundred thousand signatures, but we want a
million before Congress adjourns. Remember the President's
Proclamation reaches only the slaves of rebels. The jails of loyal
Kentucky are to-day "crammed" with Georgia, Mississippi, and Alabama
slaves, advertised to be sold for their jail fees "according to law,"
precisely as before the war! While slavery exists anywhere there can
be freedom nowhere. There must be a law abolishing slavery. We have
undertaken to canvass the nation for freedom. Women, you can not vote
or fight for your country. Your only way to be a power in the
Government is through the exercise of this, one, sacred,
constitutional "right of petition"; and we ask you to use it now to
the utmost. Go to the rich, the poor, the high, the low, the soldier,
the civilian, the white, the black--gather up the names of all who
hate slavery--all who love liberty, and would have it the law of the
land--and lay them at the feet of Congress, your silent but potent
vote for human freedom guarded by law.

You have shown true courage and self-sacrifice from the beginning of
the war. You have been angels of mercy to our sick and dying soldiers
in camp and hospital, and on the battle field. But let it not be said
that the women of the republic, absorbed in ministering to the outward
alone, saw not the philosophy of the revolution through which they
passed; understood not the moral struggle that convulsed the
nation--the irrepressible conflict between liberty and slavery.
Remember the angels of mercy and justice are twin-sisters, and ever
walk hand in hand. While you give yourselves so generously to the
Sanitary and Freemen's Commissions forget not to hold up the eternal
principles on which our republic rests. Slavery once abolished, our
brothers, husbands, and sons will never again, for its sake, be called
to die on the battle-field, starve in rebel prisons, or return to us
crippled for life; but our country, free from the one blot that has
always marred its fair escutcheon, will be an example to all the world
that "righteousness exalteth a nation." The God of Justice is with us,
and our word, our work--our prayer for freedom--will not, can not be
in vain.

E. CADY STANTON, _President_.
SUSAN B. ANTHONY, _Secretary_ W. L. N. League,
Room 20, Cooper Institute, N. Y.


OFFICE OF THE WOMEN'S LOYAL NATIONAL LEAGUE, }
Room No. 20, Cooper Institute, N. Y., _April 7, 1864_. }

_Dear Friend:_--With this you will receive a Form of a Petition to
Congress, the object of which you can not mistake nor regard with
indifference. To procure on it the largest possible number of adult
names, at the earliest practicable moment, it is hoped you will regard
as less a duty than a pleasure. Already we have sent one installment
of our petition forward, signed by one hundred thousand persons; the
presentation of which, by Senator Sumner, produced a marked effect on
both Congress and the country. We hope to send a million before the
adjournment of Congress, which we shall easily do and even more, if
you and the twenty thousand others to whom we have sent petitions will
promptly, generously co-operate with us. For nearly three years has
the scourge of war desolated us; sweeping away at least three hundred
thousand of the strength, bloom, and beauty of our nation.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.