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For nearly three years has
the scourge of war desolated us; sweeping away at least three hundred
thousand of the strength, bloom, and beauty of our nation. And the
war-chariot still rolls onward, its iron wheels deep in human blood!
The God, at whose justice Jefferson long ago trembled, has awaked to
the woes of the bondmen.

"For the sighing of the oppressed, and for the crying of the needy,
now will I arise, saith the Lord." The redemption of that pledge we
now behold in this dread Apocalypse of war. Nor should we expect or
hope the calamity will cease while the fearful cause of it remains.
Slavery has long been our national sin. War is its natural and just
retribution. But the war has made it the constitutional right of the
Government, as it always has been the moral duty of the people, to
abolish slavery. We are, therefore, without excuse, if the solemn duty
be not now performed. With us, the people, is the power to achieve the
work by our agents in Congress. On us, therefore, rests the momentous
responsibility. Shall we not all join then in one loud, earnest,
effectual prayer to Congress, which will swell on its ear like the
voice of many waters, that this bloody, desolating war shall be
arrested and ended, by the immediate and final removal, by Statute Law
and amended Constitution, of that crime and curse which alone has
brought it upon us? Now surely is our accepted time. On our own heads
will be the blood of our thousands slain, if, with the power in our
own hands, we do not end that system forever, which is so plainly
autographed all over with the Divine displeasure. In the name of
justice and of freedom then let us rise and decree the destruction of
our destroyer. Let us with myriad voice _compel_ Congress to

"Consign it to remorseless fire!
Watch till the last faint spark expire;
Then strew its ashes on the wind,
Nor leave one atom wreck behind."

In behalf of the Women's League, SUSAN B. ANTHONY, _Secretary_.


FORM OF PETITION.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in
Congress assembled:_

The undersigned, citizens of ----, believing slavery the great cause
of the present rebellion, and an institution fatal to the life of
Republican Government, earnestly pray your Honorable Bodies to
immediately abolish it throughout the United States; and to adopt
measures for so amending the Constitution, as forever to prohibit its
existence in any portion of our common country.

MEN. | WOMEN.

_Anniversary Meeting, May 14, 1864._--The adjourned meeting convened
in the lecture-room of the Church of the Puritans, Saturday P.M., May
14th. The President in the chair.

The Secretary read the report of the Executive Committee, which was
unanimously adopted. The resolutions were then read, and motion taken
to act upon them separately. The 2d, 7th, and 8th elicited a long and
earnest discussion, but were at last adopted, with but one or two
dissenting votes.

The Committee then presented a list of women to serve as officers the
coming year, who were unanimously elected.

Officers of the Women's National League:--_President_, Elizabeth Cady
Stanton; _Vice-Presidents_, L. M. Brownson, Mary Bates, Mrs. Col. A.
B. Eaton, S. A. Fayerweather; _Corresponding Secretary_, Charlotte B.
Wilbour; _Recording Secretaries_, Susan B. Anthony, Elvira Lane;
_Treasurer_, Mary F. Gilbert; _Executive Committee_, Mrs. L. M.
Brownson, Mrs. H. M. Jacobs, Mary O. Gale, Mattie Griffith, Redelia
Bates, Rebecca K. Shepherd, Frances V. Halleck, Mrs. C. S. Lozier,
M.D.; Laura M. Ward, M.D.; Malvina A. Lane.

_The Women's National League to its Members and Friends_:--The
folding, directing, and sending out 20,000 petitions, then the
assorting, counting, and rolling up, each State by itself, 300,000
signatures, has been an herculean task, that only those who have
witnessed it could fully appreciate. Remember that paper, printing,
postage, office, and clerks, all require money. At the last meeting of
the Executive Committee we resolved to ask each of our 5,000 members
to send us the small sum of fifty cents to carry on the work.

Let the petitions be thoroughly circulated during the summer,
throughout the country, that the people may speak in thunder-tones to
our next Congress at its earliest sittings. Neither the Emancipation
or Amendment bill has yet passed the House, and the recent vote on the
Montana question shows the animus of the Administration. If the
majority of our voters propose to re-elect such men to rule over us,
those who believe in free institutions must begin the work of
educating the nation into the idea that a stable government must be
founded on justice--that freedom and equality are rights that belong
to every citizen of a republic.

SUSAN B. ANTHONY, _Secretary_, 20 Cooper Institute.


_Amend the Constitution._--The Women's National League have just sent
out, all through the States, fifteen thousand petitions, with an
appeal to have them filled up and returned as speedily as possible.
The bill to amend the Constitution so as to prohibit the holding of
slaves in any part of the country has passed the Senate. Now comes the
struggle in the House. If every one of the fifteen thousand
persons--at least ten thousand of them ministers--will but gather up
one hundred or more names, _a million-voiced petition_ may yet pour
into the Representatives' Hall; and such a voice from _the people_ can
not but make sure the vote, and leave the bill ready for the
President's signature, and Congress disposed to recommend that a
special session of each State Legislature be called immediately to act
upon the question; and thus the hateful thing--Slavery--be buried out
of sight before the opening of the Presidential campaign. Let the
petitions be mailed to Washington, direct, to some member, or to Hon.
Thomas D. Eliot, Chairman of Committee on Slavery and Freedmen. There
is not a day to be lost. Let all work.--_The National Anti-Slavery
Standard_, May 28, 1864.


_The World._

NEW YORK CITY, _July 25, 1864_.

WOMEN'S LOYAL NATIONAL LEAGUE.

_The Necessity for Funds--The Delinquency of the Friends of the
Negro--Miss Anthony on the Constitution--Fighting, a Barbaric way of
Settling Questions._--About fifteen ladies and half a dozen gentlemen
were present at the meeting of the Woman's League, yesterday. Although
more than one of the speakers bewailed the delinquency of the "friends
of the negro" in failing to supply the League with the necessary
funds, yet the piles of post-paid circulars on the tables, ready for
the mail, were larger than ever. There was also a bundle of tracts on
emancipation as the only means of peace.

The meeting being called to order, a committee reported a series of
resolutions, the gist of which was that, whereas the League is
continually receiving from its friends to whom it applies for
pecuniary assistance communications stating that the day for petition
and discussion is past, and that the bullet and bayonet are now
working out the stern logic of events; nevertheless the League
considers that such day is not past, and it urges the friends of the
negro to come forward boldly and pour out of their abundance liberally
for its aid.


SPEECH BY MISS SUSAN B. ANTHONY.

Miss Susan B. Anthony made a speech arguing that the decision of the
anti-slavery question should not be left to the "stern logic of
events" which is wrought by the bullet and the bayonet. More knowledge
is needed. The eyes and the ears of the whole public are now open. It
should be the earnest work of every lover of freedom to give those
eyes the right thing to see and those ears the right thing to hear. It
pains her to receive in answer to a call for assistance and funds,
letters saying that the day for discussion and petition is past. It
looks as if we had returned to the old condition of barbarism, where
no way is known of settling questions except by fighting. Women, who
are noted for having control of the moral department of society and
for lifting the other half of the race into a higher moral condition,
should not relapse into the idea that the status of any human being is
to be settled merely by the sword. Miss Anthony then spoke of the
constitutional right of Congress to pass an emancipation law. She read
a letter from a lady who, on receiving documents from the League,
first doubted the power of Congress to pass such a law; then she
thought perhaps it had; then she compared the petition and the
Constitution; then she thought it had no such power, and finally she
concluded to circulate the petition anyhow. Miss Anthony proceeded at
some length to expound the Constitution, showing that it does not say
that slaves shall not be emancipated, and therefore concluding that
they may. But if Congress can not emancipate slaves constitutionally,
it should do so unconstitutionally. She does not believe in this
red-tapism that can not find a law to suppress the wrong, but always
finds one to oppress the innocent. If she was a mayor, or a governor,
or a legislator, and there was no law to punish mobocrats, she thought
she should go to work to make one pretty quick. She requested the
opinion of some gentleman.

A gentleman present related a number of touching incidents about the
recent mobbing of negroes in this city, most of which have already
appeared in print in this and other papers. Miss Anthony held up two
photographs to the view of the audience. One represented "Sojourner
Truth," the heroine of one of Mrs. H. B. Stowe's tales, and the other
the bare back of a Louisiana slave. Many of the audience were affected
to tears. "Sojourner Truth" had lost three fingers of one hand, and
the Louisiana slave's back bore scars of whipping. She asked every one
to suppose that woman was her mother, and that man her father. In that
case would they think the time past for discussion and petition? The
resolutions were at once unanimously passed. The meeting adjourned.


MISS ANTHONY IN CHICAGO.

Miss Susan B.



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