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Anthony is now on her homeward way from Kansas, where
she has been spending several of the past months, and where she has
performed much excellent service in the cause of the freedmen of the
country generally. She has recently visited Chicago and given a
lecture, which is highly commended by the _Tribune_ and _Republican_
of that city, the latter giving an extended report of it in its
columns, besides pronouncing upon it very flattering encomiums,
concluding with these words: "The audience dwelt with thoughtful and
marked interest upon her words, and when occasionally her remarks
called forth an irrepressible burst of feeling, the applause was
marked and emphatic, without descending to a noisy disturbance." Of
the lecture in general, the Chicago _Tribune_ thus speaks:

Last evening Miss Susan B. Anthony, of Rochester, N. Y., addressed an
audience composed chiefly of colored people, in Quinn's Chapel. Her
subject was "Universal Suffrage." Mrs. Jones, the President of the
Ladies' Aid Society, in introducing her, said: "She was one of their
old and firm friends; not one who had believed in sitting down to the
communion first, and letting the negro come last. She was not one who
needed to have her father or brothers starved in Southern prisons, to
make her aware of the humanity of the black man."

Miss Anthony is a clear, logical speaker, earnest and truthful, and
has long considered the questions of the day. Few _men_ in this or any
other city could more ably present the subject, or more closely chain
the audience that listened to her noble utterances, and one could not
but wish that she had spoken to thousands rather than hundreds. Miss
A. is recently from Leavenworth, Kansas, where she has been spending
some months past, aiding as she had opportunity, in the elevation of
the freed people, and occasionally by lectures, contributing to form a
true public sentiment in that new State. Consequently, she speaks from
absolute knowledge of the present state of the freedmen. Her criticism
of the theories of reconstruction was masterly, showing that the
fundamental principles of this Government are set aside and really
endanger all that we have seemed to gain by the war, and that nothing
but the admission of the black man to the franchise can save the
nation from future disgrace and ultimate ruin.--_National Anti-Slavery
Standard_, August, 1865.

* * * * *

CHAPTER XVIII.

NATIONAL CONVENTIONS, 1866 AND 1867.

_Report made to the Eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention._

BY CAROLINE H. DALL.

For the last five years the women of the United States have held few
public discussions. They have done wisely. Circumstances have proved
their friend. Nothing ever had done, nothing ever will do again, so
great a service to woman in so short a time, as this dreadful war out
of which we are so slowly emerging. Respect for woman came only with
the absolute need of her, and so many women of distinguished ability
made themselves of service to the Government, that we had no single
woman to honor as England had honored Florence Nightingale. With us
her name was _legion_. But with the prospect of peace comes the old
duty of agitation, and we find ourselves again summoned to a
Convention, and again anxiously awaiting its results--_anxiously_, for
a convention of women is an object which still attracts the gaze of
the curious, and the smallest indiscretion on the part of a single
speaker has a retrograde effect which few women seem able to measure.

Our reform is unlike all others, for it must begin in the family, at
the very heart of society. If it be not kindly, temperately, and
thoughtfully conducted, men everywhere will be able to justify their
remonstrances. Let us rather justify ourselves. My last report to any
Convention was made to those called in Boston in 1859 and 1860.
Between that time and 1863 I printed five volumes, which are nothing
but reports upon the various interests significant to our cause.
During the last four years I have watched the development of American
industry in its relation to women, and have, through the newspapers,
aroused public feeling in their behalf. My labor is naturally classed
under the three heads of Education, Labor, and Law. A proper education
must prepare woman for labor, skilled or manual; and the experience of
a laborer should introduce her to citizenship, for it provides her
with rights to protect, privileges to secure, and property to be
taxed. If she is a laborer, she must have an interest in the laws
which control labor. In considering our position in these three
respects, it is impossible to offer you a digest of all that has
occurred during the last six years. What I have to say will refer
chiefly to the events of the last two.


EDUCATION.

I wish it were in my power to furnish you with reports of the present
condition of all the female colleges in the United States; but, while
I receive from various foreign sources such reports, and am promptly
informed of any educational movement in Europe, it never seems to
occur to the government of such institutions in the United States that
there is any necessary connection between them and the interests which
this Convention represents. We are, consequently, dependent upon
newspapers for our information.

The most important educational movement of the last year has been the
formation of an American Social Science Association, with four
departments, and two women on its Board of Directors. Subsequently,
the Boston Social Science Association was organized, with seven
departments, and seven women on its Board of Directors, one woman
being assigned to each department, including that of law. Any woman in
the United States can become a member of this Association. If the
opportunities it offers are not seized, it will be the fault of women
themselves.

During the past winter the Lowell Institute, in Boston, in connection
with the government of the Massachusetts Technological Institute, took
a step which deserves our public mention. They advertised classes for
both sexes, under the most eligible professors, for instruction in
French, mathematics, and natural science. As the training was to be
thorough, the number of pupils was limited, and the _women_ who
applied would have filled the seats many times over. These classes
have been wholly free, and have added to the obligation which the free
Art School for women had already conferred.

Elmira College showed its enterprise last summer by a visit to
Massachusetts, and Vassar College was organized and commenced its
operations in September, with Miss Mitchell in the Chair of
Mathematics, and Miss Avery in that of Physiology. I attempted to
visit this institution last summer for the purpose of investigating
the facilities its buildings and proposed courses might offer to
foreign students. The reluctance of the Trustees to subject it to
observation so early in its career interfered with my plan, but I have
since received a letter from Miss Mitchell speaking of it in the most
encouraging terms. "I have a class," she says, "of seventeen pupils,
between the ages of 16 and 22. They come to me for fifty minutes every
day. I allow them great freedom in questioning, and I am puzzled by
them daily. They show more mathematical ability and more originality
of thought than I had expected. I doubt whether young men would show
as deep an interest. Are there seventeen students in Harvard College
who take mathematical astronomy, do you think?" So Mr. Vassar's
magnificent donation is drawing interest at last.

On the 25th of June, 1865, the Ripley College, at Poultney, Vermont,
celebrated its commencement. Seventeen young ladies were graduated.
Ralph Waldo Emerson delivered the literary address, and two days were
devoted to the examination of incoming pupils. Feeling very little
satisfaction in the success of Colleges intended for the separate
sexes, I take more pleasure in speaking of the Baker University in
Kansas, which was chartered by the Legislature of that State in 1857
as a University for both sexes. It has now been in active operation
for seven years. A little more than a year ago Miss Martha Baldwin, a
graduate of the Baldwin University at Berea, Ohio, was appointed to
the chair of Greek and Latin. She is but twenty-one years of age, but
was elected by the government to make the address for the Faculty at
the opening of the commencement exercises, and seems to have given
entire satisfaction during her professors' year. In France, the
Imperial Geographical Society, which is in a certain sense a college,
has lately admitted to membership Madame Dora D'Istra as the successor
to Madame Pfeiffer. Madame D'Istra had distinguished herself by
researches in the Morea.

On the 26th of October, 1864, a a Workingwomen's College was opened in
London, with an address from Miss F. R. Malleson. It is governed by a
council of teachers. In addition to the ordinary branches, it offers
instruction in Botany, Physiology, and Drawing. Its fee is four
shillings a year, and the coffee and reading-room, about which its
social life centres, is open every evening from 7 to 11. But by far
the most interesting educational movement is Miss Nightingale's
"Training-school for Nurses," which has been in operation for three
years in Liverpool. It was founded after a correspondence with her, in
strict conformity to her counsel. As a training-school it may be said
to be self-supporting, but it is also a beneficent institution, and in
that regard is sustained by donations. A most admirable system of
district nursing is provided under its auspices for the whole city of
Liverpool, all of whose suffering sick become, in this way, the
recipients of intelligent care and of valuable instruction in cooking
and all sanitary matters. It is too tempting an experiment to dwell
upon, unless we could follow it into its details. Its Report occupies
101 pages.

As regards medical education, we know of two colleges, or rather of
one college and one hospital, in Boston, where education is given.
There is one in Springfield and one in Philadelphia.



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