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God sent to her
early years dark trials and privations. Her father's tyrannical hand
crushed all power and loveliness out of her life. At first she
rebelled against her sufferings, but when he died in her girlhood she
was able to see that they lent strength to her efforts for her sex. It
was the rumor of what we were doing in this country for women that
first drew her hither. It is not the fashion for Miss Bremer's friends
fully to recognize her position in this respect. I owe my own
convictions on the subject of suffrage to the reflections she
awakened. When I told her that my mind was undecided on this point,
she showed her disappointment so plainly, that I was forced to
reconsider the whole subject. Miss Bremer did not hurry her work. She
had a serene confidence that she should be permitted to finish what
she had begun. She secured popularity by her cheerful humor, her
genuine feeling, her true appreciation of men, and her insight into
the conditions of family happiness, before she made any direct appeal
against existing laws. Those who will read her novels thoughtfully,
however, will see that she was from the first intent upon making such
an effort possible. From the beginning she pleaded for the social
independence of wives; asked for them a separate purse; showed that
woman could not even give her love freely, until she was independent
of him to whom she owed it. To a just state of society, to noble
family relations, entire freedom is essential.

Under her influence females had been admitted to the Musical Academy.
The Directors of the Industrial School at Stockholm had attempted to
form a class, and Professor Quarnstromm had opened his classes at the
Academy of Fine Arts to women. Cheered by her sympathy, a female
surgeon had sustained herself in Stockholm, and Bishop Argardh
indorsed the darkest picture she had ever drawn, when he pleaded with
the state to establish a girls' school. It was at this juncture that
Miss Bremer published Hertha. This book was a direct blow aimed at the
laws of Sweden concerning women. By this time she had herself become
in Sweden what we might fitly call a "crowned head." She was
everywhere treated with distinction, and her sudden appearance in any
place was greeted with the enthusiasm usually shown by such nations
only to their princes. She said of her new book: "I have poured into
it more of my heart and life than into anything which I have ever
written," and, verily, she had her reward. She was at Rome, two years
after, in 1858, when the glad news reached her that King Oscar, at the
opening of the Diet, had proposed a bill entitling women to hold
independent property at the age of twenty-five. All Sweden had read
the book which moved the heart of the King, and the assembled
representatives rent the air with their acclamations.

In the following spring the old University town of Upsala, where her
friend Bergfalk occupies a chair, granted the _right of suffrage_ to
fifty women owning real estate, and to thirty-one doing business on
their own account. The representative their votes went to elect was to
sit in the House of Burgesses. Miss Bremer was not ashamed to shed
happy tears when this news reached her. If she had ever reproached
Providence with the bitter sorrow of her early years, she was penitent
and grateful now. Then was fulfilled the prophecy which she had
uttered, as she left our shores: "The nation which was first among
Scandinavians to liberate its slaves shall also be the first to
emancipate its women!"

BOSTON, _April 26, 1866_. CAROLINE H. DALL.

P. S.--To add one word to this deeply interesting and able report may
seem presumptuous, but it is fitting that something be said of those
women in our own country in whom we feel a proper pride. In
literature, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lydia Maria Child are
unsurpassed by any writers of our day. The former is remarkable for
her descriptive powers, intuition of character, and rare common sense;
the latter for patient research, sound reason, and high moral tone. No
country has produced a woman of such oratorical powers as our peerless
Anna Dickinson. Young, beautiful, and always on the right side of
every question, her influence on the politics of this country for the
last four years has been as powerful as beneficent. She has more
invitations to speak before the first-class lyceums of the country, at
two hundred dollars an evening, than she can accept, and draws crowded
houses wherever she goes.


PHYSICAL CULTURE.

A friend who had visited Vassar College, after mentioning the fact of
its two women professors--Miss Mitchell and Miss Avery--informed us
that Elizabeth M. Powell is teacher of gymnastics there, and wonders
whether success may not win for Miss Powell a place in the Faculty.
There are literary societies in which the girls write and read essays,
and give recitations, and have discussions, and President Raymond
drills them in elocution or public entertainments. And yet, our friend
says, "I dare say that it would be pronounced a very improper thing
for women to speak in public, if the Faculty were to vote on the
question." The influences of Vassar are altogether conservative.

Miss Mitchell is a woman of great force of character, the very soul of
integrity, and entirely independent in her religious views. She thinks
the theory of Woman's Rights all right, but her tastes are all against
it. She dreads to be in the least conspicuous.

Miss Avery is a woman of great dignity and strength, and her presence
and lectures can not fail to stimulate the girls to a noble womanhood.
She tells them work is the necessity of the soul.

Miss Powell, a remarkably earnest young woman of rare moral and
intellectual worth, has a grand field, and opens her work with good
promise. Her first aim is to do away with tight-dressing. She believes
that when women have deeper breathing they will have higher
aspirations. That when women will apply conscience to their dress,
they will be prepared for more important truths.

In the great attention given to gymnasiums everywhere, we see the dawn
of a new day of physical and mental power in woman. Mrs. Plumb's
institution in this city, where hundreds of girls are trained every
year, is a complete success.


EQUAL EDUCATION.

ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY, CANTON, N. Y., _May 4, 1866_.

MISS ANTHONY:--Your letter came into my hands after some delay. I
hasten to reply to your inquiries. Our college is young yet. The first
class of two graduated last year. Two young ladies are to graduate at
the close of this term.

We receive ladies and gentlemen on the same terms and conditions; take
them together into the recitation-room, where they recite side by
side; require them to pursue the same course of study; and, when
satisfactorily completed, give them degrees of the same rank and
honor--Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts to gentlemen, Laureate
of Science and Laureate of Arts to ladies. Both sexes are required to
pursue the same course of study, with the exception of civil
engineering and political economy, which are merely optional studies
with the ladies.

We have two departments--Academical and Collegiate. The sexes are
about equal in number in each department. We have only about twenty in
the Collegiate Department. Half of these are ladies, among whom are
some of our best in Mathematics, Languages, and Natural Sciences.

We have also a Theological Department, to which ladies have access. We
have received applications from only two yet. One, Miss Olympia Brown,
is pastor of a Society in Weymouth, Mass., and is succeeding very
well. She is a graduate of Antioch College as well of our Theological
department. The other is now here.

Lombard University, Galesburgh, Ill., receives ladies, and takes them
through the same course as gentlemen, and gives them equal degrees. I
deeply sympathize with you in your efforts to raise the character and
improve the condition of woman, though, perhaps, I should not be quite
so radical as some in your Convention. Your cause is a good one, and I
pray Heaven that it do good.

J. S. LEE,
_Principal of the Collegiate Department St. Lawrence University_.


Genesee College at Lima, New York--a Methodist institution--opens its
doors equally to women, and has graduated several young ladies. Then
we must never forget to mention and bless Oberlin for its pioneer work
in the equal education of women. It was Oberlin that gave us Lucy
Stone, Rev. Antoinette Brown Blackwell, Sallie Holley, and Frances
Ellen Watkins Harper, to speak early and brave words for woman and the
slave. And Antioch College that graduated the Rev. Olympia Brown.
Mention too should be made of Rev. Lydia A. Jenkins, who has been a
successful preacher among the Universalists for the last eight or ten
years, and is now settled at Binghamton, New York.

Of the MEDICAL PROFESSION it should be stated for the encouragement of
the young, that there are over three hundred graduates from the
several medical colleges for women, and that there is scarcely a
village throughout the country but has its woman physician of greater
or less skill. In New York city there are many successful physicians
besides the Drs. Blackwell. Dr. Clemence S. Lozier has a practice of
$15,000 a year, and owns two fine houses, all the proceeds of her own
perseverance. In Orange, New Jersey, Dr. Almira L. Fowler is very
popular, with a paying practice of $5,000 per year, besides a large
gratuitous service. In Philadelphia are Dr. Hannah E. Longshore, with
a $10,000 per annum practice, then there are Drs. Ann Preston, R.
Tressel, H. J. Sartain, E. Cleveland, J. Myres, and others, with
practices ranging from $5,000 to $2,000. In Utica, New York, Dr.
Pamelia Bronson is a successful physician. In Albion, is Dr. Vail. In
Weedsport, Dr. Harriet E. Seeley. In Rochester, Dr. Sarah R. A. Dolley
numbers among her patrons many persons of wealth and fashion, who but
a few years ago ridiculed the idea of a "lady doctor." Mrs.



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