A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
Dolley
numbers among her patrons many persons of wealth and fashion, who but
a few years ago ridiculed the idea of a "lady doctor." Mrs. Dolley's
practice brings her fully $3,000 a year. In a letter to one of our
Committee Mrs. Dolley says, "May your labors be prospered, that the
women of our country may have a _sphere_ rather than a _hemi_sphere!
Dr. R. B. Glasson, of Elmira, Dr. S. Ivison, of Ithaca, New York, and
Dr. Green, late of Clifton Springs, who has opened a water-cure
somewhere in Western New York, all do a large amount of practice, and
with the greatest acceptance to those who favor Hydropathic treatment.
Dr. Ross, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has a large practice, and commands
the respect of the profession. And, as Mrs. Dall says of the many
noble women who served efficiently in our armies during the war
without even sounding the name of the wonderful Clara Barton, so we
have to say of our woman physicians, "their name is legion."

The following is an item from the Boston _Commonwealth_:

FURTHER PROGRESS IN WOMAN'S RIGHTS.--Miss Stebbins, of Chickasaw
County, Iowa, has received an appointment as Notary Public for that
county. She is the first female ever having received such a
commission, and is represented as eminently competent.

This from the National Anti-Slavery _Standard_:

WOMAN'S RIGHTS IN HUNGARY.--A curious petition has been presented to
the Hungarian Diet. It is signed by a number of widows and other women
who are landed proprietors, and asks for them the same equality of
political rights with the male inhabitants of the country as they
possessed in 1848. These ladies represent that they have much more
difficulty in bringing up their children and attending to their
estates than men; that they have to bear the same State burdens; that
they are not allowed to take part in the communal elections; and that,
although many of them possess much more ground than the male electors,
they have no political rights.

There is one point in the report open to objection. It is not fair to
say that Mrs. Farnham's life "was a bitter disappointment to herself."
Who does realize in life all that in starting was looked for? Who has
nothing to regret? With a heart so generous and sympathizing as
hers--a mind so disciplined and stored with general information--a
life so rich in practical usefulness, she was not only a blessing to
others, but she must have had a more than an ordinary share of that
peace and happiness that gladdens every Christian life. I have just
read her last great work. I took it up with prejudice, not believing
her theory of the superiority of woman. I lay it down with a higher
idea of woman's destiny, and a profound reverence for the author of
the glorious thoughts that thrill my heart. I never met Mrs. Farnham
on earth, but I know and honor and love her now, and from the
celestial shores feel the pulsations of a true and noble soul.

E. C. S.

* * * * *

LETTERS.


WAYLAND, _April 28_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:-- ... What I most wish for women is that they
should go right ahead, and do whatever they can do well, without
talking about it. But the false position in which they are placed by
the laws and customs of society, renders it almost impossible that
they should be sufficiently independent to do whatever they can do
well, unless the world approves of it. They need a great deal of
talking to, to make them aware that they are in fetters. Therefore I
say, success to your Convention, and to all similar ones!...

I am very cordially yours, LYDIA MARIA CHILD.


NEW CASTLE, DEL., _April 21, 1866_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:-- ... I am with you in heart and sympathy,
rejecting with contempt the antiquated idea that woman is only fit for
a plaything or a household drudge. Nor can I see how it is less
dignified to go to a public building to deposit a vote than to
frequent the concert-room, whirl through the waltz in happy repose on
some roue's bosom, or mingle in any public crowd which is, in modern
times, quite admissible in polite society. Dethrone the idol and raise
the soul to its true and noble elevation, supported on a foundation of
undying principle, and woman becomes a thing of life and beauty--then
only fit to raise sons to be rulers. Justice requires your success,
and I hope the age will prove itself sufficiently enlightened to mete
out to you the reward of your years of toil.

Yours sincerely, JANE VOORHEES LESLIE.


MONDAY, _April 22_.

DEAR MISS ANTHONY:--What I enclose is not much for the work you have
to do, but it is all I can proportion out for it just now. You are
quite right in relying on my regard for you, although I can not see
the subject as you do, and I was pleased to get your note saying so. I
am sure you take great interest in following Mr. Gladstone's bill for
the extension of suffrage in England. His speech upon it is in great
contrast to the shallow nonsense talked by many Americans against our
democratic form of government.

Very sincerely yours, JESSIE BENTON FREMONT.


13 CHESTNUT ST., BOSTON, _April 19, 1866_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:--I have received yours of 14th inst., making
eloquent and friendly appeal to me for the expression of my sympathy,
written or spoken, in behalf of your forthcoming "Woman's Rights
Convention." Surely you need not my assurance that I most heartily
indorse all the claims and objects of your Association; that I
earnestly advocate whatever would advance or insure the rights of
humanity, whether for man or woman; that I as earnestly protest
against any and all prejudices, limitations, or legislations which
would interfere with those rights; that I claim for woman as ample
social and civil privileges as are conceded to man, whether in the
exercise of the franchise, the domain of our legislatures, or in the
sphere of the professions. We are no true men if we deny or would
barricade the exercise or the claim of those privileges, and have just
so much less of manhood as we dare to question or infringe them. I
agree with you, most fully, that the woman element is greatly needed
in the present crisis of our affairs for the right reconstruction of
our suffering Government. We have had, and still have, not men but too
many brutes making a very "bear garden" of our congressional halls,
rending and tearing this poor "body politic" of ours till, like the
raving demoniacs of old, it is now foaming and wandering crazily
around its own preconstructed tomb! while at the head of the
Government we have only a surly, self-conceited despot in embryo! "The
nation needs (as you say) at this hour the highest thought and
inspiration of a true womanhood infused into every vein and artery of
its life." There is no gainsaying your arguments on that head, for
just so far, and only so far as the refining influence of that womanly
element is so infused and felt in all our social and civil relations,
will the consummation of our national peace and prosperity be
effected.

Yours truly, J. T. SARGENT.


WEST NEWTON, _May 6, 1866_.

E. C. STANTON, _President Executive Committee Women's Rights
Association_:

MY DEAR MRS. S.:--I had hoped to be present at this, our eleventh
anniversary, but find it impossible. And so, at the last moment, I
hasten to express my earnest conviction that now, as never before, we
are called upon for vigorous, united action--that we are left no
alternative but an unflinching protest against the strange legislation
by which a Republican Congress, so-called, assumes to engraft upon our
national Constitution, as "amendments!" clauses which not only allow
rebels to disfranchise loyal soldiers, who have borne the flag of the
Republic victoriously against their treason and rebellion, but to keep
the ballot from the hands of all women!

If not moved by an enlightened appreciation of the first principles of
political economy and social justice in legislation touching them
heretofore, we could scarcely believe that after the record made by
both the proscribed classes during our late fearful struggle, our
legislators could gravely stoop to brand them anew as "aliens" and
outlaws! It is an act as discreditable to their hearts and their moral
sense as to their statesmanship. And upon their shoulders must rest
the responsibility of an agitation to which we are thus forced--an
agitation which we have hesitated to arouse while so many vital
questions touching the future of the negro were awaiting settlement,
and in which we are acting strictly on the defensive. Under the
magnificent utterance of our brave Senator Sumner--which was an
inspiration and a prophecy--we looked to see all faltering and
compromise, so fatal in all our past, so fatal always and everywhere,
swept like dew before the sun. But the old fears and falterings return
sevenfold reinforced to renew a puerile and patch-work legislation,
which, while asserting the truth, submits to, nay, invites a fresh
struggle over each separate application of the same "self-evident
truth." What remains for us, then, but to turn from a Congress from
which we had hoped so much, which might have dared anything in the
interest of loyalty and justice, as our brave brethren turned, from a
recreant President to the people, whom he and Congress have not dared
to trust, and resolve to do our utmost to awaken a public sentiment
which only slumbers, but is not dead, and which shall make impossible
such burlesques, such infamous "amendments" to our organic law. With
undiminished hope and faith, yours,

CAROLINE M. SEVERANCE.


HARTFORD, _April 22, 1866_.

DEAR MADAM:--I learn by a circular I have received that a Woman's
Rights Convention is to be held in New York in May.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.