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This was more than thirty years ago, and some improvements
have since been made in the laws in reference to women.

The next great wrong that pressed heavily upon me was when I again
became a widow. I found myself yearly taxed for State and county, and
later for revenue, without a voice in anything that concerned the
raising of money, or in any of the elections to office in the great
struggle that our country was passing through. With all the deep
feeling of my brethren, a clear appreciation of the all-important
issues at stake, and an intensely painful knowledge of the sin of
slavery and its concomitant evils, I could not cast a vote in favor
of the right, but must look on with folded hands, and give my money to
support the Government, without a chance of giving it an impetus,
however slight, in the direction of justice and liberty! In view of
all these wrongs, I felt that the women of America had as just cause
for rebellion against the Government as our fathers had against the
British Government when they resisted, on the ground that taxation and
representation were one and inseparable. The three great desires of my
life have been: That the halls of learning should be universally open
to all souls who desire to enter them; that the property rights of
all, without regard to sex, color, or race, should stand on the same
foundation, and be equal; that every person twenty-one years old, who
is a citizen of the United States, should have the ballot, unless
disfranchised by crime, idiocy, or insanity. When these three things
are granted, all else will follow in due time. But until these things
are assured to the citizens of America, our Government presents the
anomaly of being professedly founded upon the consent of the governed,
and yet shutting out two-thirds of its citizens from all voice in it.

* * * * *

MERCY B. JACKSON, M.D.


CHICAGO, _March 22, 1867_.

DEAR MISS ANTHONY:--I feel that I must do something for the "Woman's
Suffrage" movement in the West. There is much interest here
concerning it, but no movement is yet made. Matters are being
prepared, and when the movement is made in the West, it will
sweep onward majestically. Kansas and Iowa will first give women the
right to vote before any other States, East or West. "Man proposes,
but God disposes." I have always had a theory of my own concerning
this suffrage question. Ever since I began to think of it, and that
has been since Dr. Harriot Hunt's first protest against woman being
taxed when she had no representation, I have believed that, in my day,
woman would vote. But I have thought they would first obtain the right
to work and wages, and that the right to vote would naturally follow.
For woman's right to work and wages I have labored indefatigably. But
I see that my plan is not God's plan. The right to vote is to come
first, and work and wages afterwards, and easily. I "stumped" the
Northwest during the war. Two women of us, Mrs. Hoge and myself,
organized over 1,000 Aid Societies, and raised, in money and supplies,
nearly $100,000 for the soldiers; and to do it, we were compelled to
get people together in masses, and tell our story and our plans, and
make our appeals to hundreds at a time. So I can talk here, and can
help you here, when you are ready to lead. In the meanwhile, I have
begun to work for the cause through my husband's weekly paper, which
has a large circulation in the Northwest. I have announced myself as
henceforth committed to the cause of woman suffrage, and have become
involved, instanter, in a controversy on the subject. I am associate
editor of the paper, and have been these dozen years. I have just
completed a reply to an objector to the doctrine, which goes into this
week's issue. In my way, I am working with you. I have always believed
in the ballot for woman at some future time--always, since reading
Margaret Fuller's "Woman in the Nineteenth Century," which set me to
thinking a quarter of a century ago. Boston is my native city, and I
lived there till my marriage, and had one or two talks with Theodore
Parker which helped me wonderfully.

Yours truly, MARY A. LIVERMORE.


TOPEKA, KANSAS, _April 5, 1867_.

DEAR MADAM:--We are now arranging for a thorough canvass of our State
for impartial suffrage, without regard to sex or color. We are
satisfied that an argument in favor of colored suffrage is an argument
in favor of woman suffrage. Both are based upon the same principle. It
is the doctrine of our fathers "that governments derive their just
powers from the consent of the governed." We "white men" have no right
to ask privileges or demand rights for ourselves that we are unwilling
to grant to the whole human family. There never has been, and never
can be, an argument, based upon principle, against colored or woman
suffrage. Sneers and attempts at ridicule are not arguments. Henry B.
Blackwell, of New Jersey, and Mrs. Lucy Stone, are now canvassing our
State for impartial suffrage. Some of the most eminent men and women
of the United States have been invited, and promised to visit our
State this summer and fall; and we shall succeed. Kansas will be
free, and occupy the proudest place, in all time to come, in the
history of the world.

We desire to extend our meetings to every neighborhood in Kansas;
reach, if possible, the ear of every voter. For this purpose we must
enlist every home speaker possible. We shall arrange series of
meetings in all parts of the State, commencing about September 1st,
and running through September and October. We desire speakers to
advocate the broad doctrine of impartial suffrage, but welcome those
who advocate either. Those who desire colored suffrage alone, are
invited to take the field; also those who favor only female suffrage.
Each help the other. I am instructed by the State Impartial Suffrage
Executive Committee to ask you to aid us, and speak at as many of our
meetings as possible. Please answer at once, and let us know how much
time you can spend in the campaign, and what part of the State you
prefer to speak in.

Yours truly, S. N. WOOD,
_Cor. Sec'y Kansas Impartial Suffrage Association_.


BANGOR, ME., _May 9, 1867_.

DEAR MISS ANTHONY:--I should be truly glad to attend the Annual
Meeting; but, as you see, I am far from New York. Mr. Davis and I are
at work in another part of the great field of progress. While you and
your noble friend, Mrs. Stanton, are endeavoring to move the adult
population of our nation to just and righteous action, we are striving
to establish on earth the beginning of the kingdom of heaven, by
instituting a new and true method of moral and spiritual or religious
education for the children and youth of the New Dispensation.
Spiritualism, as a religious movement, has done more than any previous
dispensation to give woman an equal career with man; and we trust
that, through the influence of the "Children's Progressive Lyceums,"
the youth in our midst, rapidly advancing to the stage of action, will
form a powerful phalanx on the side of "Equal Rights" and the
elevation of humanity.

Yours fraternally, MARY F. DAVIS.


BUFFALO, _April 14, 1867_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:--I thank you for your kind note.... I pray that God
will bless you in the noble work you are in, and that woman will soon
be admitted to her proper place where God intended she should be, and
from which to exclude her must, like any other great wrong, bring
misery and sorrow to the race.

Sincerely your friend, RUFUS SAXTON.


148 MADISON AVENUE, SUNDAY EVE., _April 14, 1867_.

MY DEAR MRS. STANTON:--your invitation to me to lift my voice at your
Annual Convention in behalf of the cause for which you have worked so
faithfully and so long, and, let me add, so efficiently, was duly
received; but I have an universal excuse for neglect of duty in the
multitudinous professional engagements that absorb my life and
strength. Believing in the justice of your cause, and that better laws
and better order would bless our race could they be submitted to the
arbitrament of woman, I yet am not able, individually, to give the
time to it now which would be requisite for an adequate public
presentation of its claims, but must content myself with only such
passing words of cheer as the moment calls forth in the daily
intercourse of life. I am grateful that you thought me competent to
advocate so great a principle; but he would be a bold man who would
attempt to add anything to the masterly effort of Mr. Beecher at the
last Convention.

I am, as of old, your friend, LUTHER R. MARSH.


148 MADISON AVENUE, _April 14, 1867_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:--Please accept the trifle enclosed, $20, as a token
of my friendship to the good cause, whose mighty burden of
enlightenment is to hold the growth of future cycles with an
all-controlling destiny. I am glad to see that those who have been
willing to wear the sackcloth and ashes are beginning to receive the
crowns of the olive and the bay upon their consecrated heads. Many
will find it very agreeable, now, to sail in upon the sunny and ardent
tide of the rippling river, forgetting that once it was a darksome,
sluggish stream, not pleasant to launch forth upon. My father's[208]
early championship of a despised cause taught me to hold very sacred
those pioneers in holy efforts, which to embrace was to suffer the
pangs of a daily martyrdom.

Your friend, as of old, JEANNIE MARSH.


_May 29, 1867._

It is foolish to say that the advocates of the "Woman Movement" demand
"special legislation" for woman, or desire to array her in hostility
to man.



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