A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
LOUIS, April 3.

The _Democrat's_ Topeka, Kansas, special says: "A large convention of
those in favor of impartial suffrage is in session in this city. Lucy
Stone and Dr. Blackwell, and delegates from different parts of the
State are in attendance.

"An association has been formed for the purpose of canvassing the
State thoroughly and distributing documents. The object is to carry
the female suffrage clause as well as the negro. The officers of the
association are Gov. Crawford, for President; Lieut. Gov. Green, for
Vice-President; Judge S. N. Wood, for Corresponding Secretary; and an
Executive Committee of fourteen, including such men as Chas. Robinson,
J. P. Root, J. B. Abbot, Col. Moonlight, all the members of the
Supreme Court, and other leading men of the State. Arrangements are
made to have the most prominent advocates of impartial suffrage from
the East to stump the State. Money will be raised to conduct the fall
campaign, which will probably be the most vigorously conducted of any
which has yet taken place."

The _State Record_, Kansas, says: "The opponents of woman suffrage use
the argument very freely that its advocates are not in favor of negro
suffrage. This is wickedly and wilfully false. The most earnest and
influential supporters of woman suffrage in the State are equally
anxious to give the negro his rights, and Republicans, generally, will
vote for both propositions. We hope none will be deceived by these
false charges made by those who write and speak in the interest of
saloons, and who to turn expect to be elevated to office through their
agency. The most bitter and relentless and united efforts now making
against woman suffrage, are by those who are devoting their lives to
degrading men and women too, and we are sorry to see a few respectable
men keeping them company, under the foolish impression that the
movement originated and is carried on by those who aim to defeat negro
suffrage. We earnestly hope the day is near at hand when all men and
women everywhere will be allowed to exercise their political rights."

Extract from a letter written by Mrs. S. N. Wood for the Lawrence
_Tribune_, May, 1867: "The women of Cottonwood Falls have passed
through this horrid furnace of an election, and come out unscathed.
Our laws require that a majority of all the legal voters in the
district must vote to issue bonds to build a school-house, before
bonds can be issued. As women were legal voters, to stay at home was
to vote against bonds. The election had to be conducted exactly as
other elections. It was a busy time; none of our men liked to leave
their work to spend the day at the polls, so three women were chosen
and qualified to act as judges. No guardians of the ballot-box ever
acted with more ability or behaved with more propriety and dignity
than they. There was not the least rudeness among the men; no brawling
or swearing. Not a woman there lost a particle of refinement, or
became a grain coarser, or neglected her family. Not one of the
misguided women whose bad influences Mr. Reynolds, of the _Journal_,
so much dreads, came to the polls. That kind of women, I judge, are
literally opposed to women demoralizing themselves by voting. But if
such lived in our district, and had offered to vote, I trust their
votes would have been received and counted just the same as the votes
of the men who support and encourage them in their wicked career. I
never knew what men meant when talking about bonds, until I learned
that I must vote on the subject. I wanted to vote intelligently;
sought the requisite information; and I went to the polls feeling
stronger and safer for that little knowledge gained. When I came home
my little ones hailed me as lovingly as ever, and the same mother-love
guided my hands for their comfort.

"In 1858, a 'woman's rights' man, in Kansas, believing that there
should be a perfect equality as to property rights between men and
women, wrote to Gerrit Smith, Wm. Goodell, Lucy Stone, and other
advocates of woman's rights, asking them to send him a form of a law
that would secure that object. Among others he received the framework
of a law written by Lucy Stone. He wrote it over according to her
pattern, and Lyman Allen introduced it into the Legislature. It became
a law in February, 1859. The original in Lucy Stone's handwriting is
yet in existence. The law is virtually the one that, to-day, on our
statute book testifies to the honest sense of justice that their
conflict with tyranny nurtured in our men in the early days of Kansas.
It testifies to Lucy Stone's zeal in behalf of her sex."

The following address to the Southern people was largely circulated in
Kansas during the spring campaign, by Mr. Blackwell.


WHAT THE SOUTH CAN DO.

HOW THE SOUTHERN STATES CAN MAKE THEMSELVES MASTERS OF THE SITUATION.

TO THE LEGISLATURES OF THE SOUTHERN STATES:--I write to you as the
intellectual leaders of the Southern people--men who should be able
and willing to transcend the prejudices of section--to suggest the
only ground of settlement between North and South which, in my
judgment, can be successfully adopted.

Let me state the political situation. The radical principles of the
North are immovably fixed upon negro suffrage as a condition of
Southern State reconstruction. The proposed Constitutional Amendment
is not regarded as a finality. It satisfies nobody, not even its
authors. In the minds of the Northern people the negroes are now
associated with the idea of loyalty to the Union. They are considered
citizens. They are respected as "our allies." It is believed in the
North that a majority of the white people of the South are at heart
the enemies of the Union. The advocates of negro suffrage daily grow
stronger and more numerous.

On the other hand, a majority of the Southern white population are
inflexibly opposed to negro suffrage in any form, universal or
qualified, and are prepared to resist its introduction by every means
in their power. In alliance with the President and the Northern
Democracy, they protest against any and all terms of reconstruction,
demand unconditional readmission, and await in gloomy silence the
Republican initiative.

This absolute and growing antagonism can only end, if continued, in
one of two results, either in a renewal of civil war, or in a
concession by the South of political equality to the negro. But in
case of war, the South can not possibly succeed. The North is to-day
far stronger in men and money, in farms and factories, than she was in
1860. She is now trained to war, conscious of overwhelming strength,
flushed with victory, and respected, as never before, by the nations
of Europe. Moreover, she is much more united in political sentiment.
Do not again deceive yourselves. If you should resort to arms, the
North would be practically unanimous. The President would instantly be
impeached and a radical successor appointed. The South has lost social
unity with the loss of slavery. She can not fight better than before.
And the braver her action, the more terrible would be her fate.

Gentlemen, these are facts--not theories. Wise men try to see things
as they are, uncolored by opinion or preference. The interest of both
North and South, since they must live together, is peace, harmony, and
real fraternity. No adjustment can fully succeed unless it is
acceptable to both sections. Therefore the statesman and patriot must
find a common ground as a basis of permanent reconciliation.

Now the radicalism of the North is actual, organic, and progressive.
Recognize the fact. But if "governments derive their just powers from
the consent of the governed"--if "taxation without representation is
tyranny"--and "on these two commandments hang all the (Republican) law
and the prophets"--then these propositions are as applicable to women
as to negroes. "Consistency is a jewel." The principle is so broad
that, if you accept it in its entirety, you can afford to lead--not
follow.

The population of the late slave States is about 12,000,000; 8,000,000
white, 4,000,000 black. The radicals demand suffrage for the black men
on the ground named above. Very good. Say to them, as Mr. Cowan said
to the advocates of negro male suffrage in the District, "Apply your
principle! Give suffrage to all men and women of mature age and sound
mind, and we will accept it as the basis of State and National
reconstruction."

Consider the result from the Southern standpoint. Your 4,000,000 of
Southern white women will counterbalance your 4,000,000 of negro men
and women, and thus the political supremacy of your white race will
remain unchanged.

Think well of this. It is a calculation of the relative political
influences of white women and of negroes which perhaps your people
have not yet considered. Let us make the statement in figures.
Estimating one male voter to every five persons, your present vote is:

White males 1,600,000
Add white females 1,600,000
---------
Total white voters 3,200,000

Negro males 800,000
Negro females 800,000
---------
Total negro voters 1,600,000

Suppose all the negroes vote one way and all the whites the other,
your white majority would be 1,600,000--equal to your present total
vote. Thus you would control your own State legislation. Meanwhile,
your influence in the councils of the nation will be greater than ever
before, because your emancipated slaves will be counted in the basis
of representation, instead of as formerly, in the ratio of five for
three. In the light of the history of your Confederacy, can any
Southerner fear to trust the women of the South with the ballot?

But the propriety of your making the proposal lies deeper than any
consideration of sectional expediency. If you must try the Republican
experiment, try it fully and fairly. Since you are compelled to union
with the North, remove every seed of future controversy. If you are to
share the future government of your States with a race you deem
naturally and hopelessly inferior, avert the social chaos, which seems
to you so imminent, by utilizing the intelligence and patriotism of
the wives and daughters of the South.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.