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Why, it would seem that
every earnest, philanthropic woman would desire to do so, even were
she obliged to go to the polls in their present condition instead of
the reformed and purified state that will inevitably result from the
enfranchisement of women.

The women of Kansas who, next to the Pilgrim mothers of America, have
endured more privations and taken a more active part in public affairs
than any other women of America, should of all others have a voice in
controlling the affairs of State and framing the laws by which they
shall be governed. Say some opposers, "the good and true women would
not vote, but only the ignorant and vicious." What a monstrous libel
upon the intelligence and public spirit of the women of Kansas! and
just so certainly as women obtain the ballot, as far as the
intelligent and virtuous outnumber the ignorant and abandoned, will
the vote of women swell the majority for just and righteous
measures--for the moral and upright man--the man who has never imbrued
his hands in blood--who has never robbed woman of her virtue--whose
senses are never drowned in the intoxicating bowl. Why! this is the
great moral question of the day! It is not that the prominent opposers
of this measure fear that it will drag women down; it is because they
fear, and justly, that women will lift suffrage so far into the realm
of purity and morality that they can never be able even to offer
themselves as candidates for office. Then will the destinies of our
country be no more decided at drunken orgies, amid scenes that our
opponents say it would degrade us to witness, but all questions of
public weal will be decided in the hearts and at the firesides of
pure-hearted men and women, surrounded by those whose destinies are
dearer than life, and that decision shall be enforced when men and
women shall together go up to the temple of justice to deposit their
ballots.

Whatever, then, may be the opinion of fair ladies who dwell in ceiled
houses in our older Eastern States and cities, who like lilies,
neither toil nor spin, whose fair hands would gather close their
silken apparel at the thought of touching the homelier garments of
many a heroine of Kansas--whatever they may say in reference to this
question, we, the women of the Spartan State, declare, we want to
vote.

By order of the Executive Committee.

MRS. HON. E. G. ROSS, MRS. GRIFFITH,
MRS. EX GOV. ROBINSON, MRS. R. S. TENNEY,
MRS. JUDGE THACHER, MRS. REV. W. A. STARRETT,
MRS. JUDGE MILLER, MRS. REV. R. CORDLEY,
MRS. JUDGE BURNETT, MRS. REV. G. S. DEARBORN,
MRS. JUDGE HENDRY, MRS. REV. J. S. BROWN,
MRS. H. M. SIMPSON, MRS. REV. GEORGE MEYER,
MRS. ROBT. MORROW, MRS. J. H. LANE,
MRS. MAJOR PLATT, MRS. JAMES HORTON,
MRS. MAJOR WHITNEY, MRS. F. W. SPARR,
MRS. S. DENMAN, MRS. JANE B. ARCHIBALD,
MRS. HENDERSEN, MRS. CONE,
MRS. J. O. ADAMS, MRS. WELSH,
MRS. MARY WHITCOMB, MRS. MARSH,
MRS. THERMUTIUS SUTHERLAND,

LAWRENCE, Sept. 24, 1867. _Committee on Address._

N. B.--Friends wishing tracts on the subject of equal rights, should
address Equal Rights Office, 77 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence,
Kansas.


THE HUTCHINSONS' KANSAS SUFFRAGE SONG.

Words By P. P. Fowler and J. W. H.

As sung at the meetings and concerts during ther grand campaign on the
suffrage issue the season of 1867 in Kansas, and at the polls in
Leavenworth, by the Tribe of John, on the day of election.

O, say what thrilling songs of fairies,
Wafted o'er the Kansas prairies,
Charm the ear while zephyrs speed 'em!
Woman's pleading for her freedom.

CHORUS--Clear the way, the songs are floating;
Clear the way, the world is noting;
Prepare the way, the right promoting,
And ballots, too, for woman's voting.

We frankly say to fathers, brothers,
Husbands, too, and several others,
We're bound to win our right of voting,
Don't you hear the music floating?

We come to take with you our station,
Brave defenders of the nation,
And aim by noble, just endeavor
To elevate our sex forever.

By this vote we'll rid our nation
Of its vile intoxication.
Can't get rum? Oh, what a pity!
_Dram-shops_ closed in every city.

Fear not, we'll darn each worthy stocking,
Duly keep the cradle rocking,
And beg you heed the words we utter,
The ballot wins our bread and butter.

All hail, brave Kansas! first in duty,
Yours, the meed of praise and beauty,
You'll nobly crown your deeds of daring,
Freedom to our sex declaring.

* * * * *

CHAPTER XXV.

TRIALS AND DECISIONS.

LETTER FROM MISS ANTHONY ANNOUNCING HER HAVING VOTED.

ROCHESTER, November 5, 1872.

DEAR MRS. STANTON: Well, I have been and gone and done it! positively
voted the Republican ticket--straight--this A.M. at seven o'clock, and
_swore my vote in, at that_; was registered on Friday and fifteen
other women followed suit in this ward, then in sundry other wards
some twenty or thirty women _tried_ to _register_, but all save two
were refused. All my three sisters voted--Rhoda De Garmo, too. Amy
Post was rejected, and she will immediately bring action against the
registrars; then another woman who was registered, but vote refused,
will bring action for that--similar to the Washington action. Hon.
Henry R. Selden will be our counsel; he has read up the law and all of
our arguments, and is satisfied that we are right, and ditto Judge
Samuel Selden, his elder brother. So we are in for a fine agitation in
Rochester on this question.

I hope the morning telegrams will tell of many women all over the
country trying to vote. It is splendid that without any concert of
action so many should have moved here.

Thanks for the Hartford papers. What a magnificent meeting you had!
Splendid climax of the campaign--the two ablest and most eloquent
women on one platform and the Governor of the State by your side. I
was with you in spirit that evening; the chairman of the Committee had
both telegraphed and written me all about the arrangements.

Haven't we wedged ourselves into the work pretty fairly and fully, and
now that the Republicans have taken our votes--for it _is the
Republican members_ of the board; the Democratic paper is out _against
us strong_, and that scared the Democrats on the registry boards.

How I wish you were here to write up the funny things said and done.
Rhoda De Garmo told them she wouldn't swear nor affirm, "but would
tell them the truth," and they accepted that. When the Democrats said
that my vote should _not_ go in the box, one Republican said to the
other, "What do you say, Marsh?" "I say put it in." "So do I," said
Jones; "and we'll fight it out on this line if it takes all winter."
Mary Hallowell was just here. She and Sarah Willis tried to register,
but were refused; also Mrs. Mann, the Unitarian minister's wife, and
Mary Curtis, sister of Catharine Stebbins. Not a jeer, not a word, not
a look disrespectful has met a single woman.

If only now _all the Woman Suffrage women_ would work to _this_ end of
_enforcing the existing Constitutional supremacy of National law_ over
State law, what strides we might make this very winter! But I'm
awfully tired; for five days I have been on the constant run, but to
splendid purpose; so all right. I hope you voted too.

Affectionately, SUSAN B. ANTHONY.

* * * * *

JUDGE SELDEN TO MISS ANTHONY.

ROCHESTER, November 27, 1872.

MISS ANTHONY--DEAR MADAM: The District Attorney says he can not attend
to your case on any day but Friday. So it will be indispensable for
you to be ready Friday morning, and I will do the best I can to attend
to it.

I suppose the Commissioner will, as a matter of course, hold you for
trial at the Circuit Court, _whatever your rights may be in the
matter_.

In my opinion, however, the idea that you can be charged with a
_crime_ on account of voting, or offering to vote, when you honestly
believed yourself to be a voter, is simply preposterous, whether your
belief _was right or wrong_.

However, the learned (!) gentlemen engaged in this movement seem to
suppose they can make a crime out of your honest deposit of your
ballot, and _perhaps_ they can find a respectable court or jury that
will be of their opinion. If they do so I shall be greatly
disappointed.

Yours, truly, H. R. SELDEN.


(_Boston Transcript._)

The last work came on the New York Calender; a person is discovered to
have voted who had no right to; this is believed to be the first case
of the kind ever heard of in New York, and its heinousness is perhaps
aggravated by the fact that the perpetrator is a woman, who, in the
vigorous language of the Court, "must have known when she did it that
she was a woman." We await in breathless suspense the impending
sentence.

The Rochester _Evening Express_ of Friday, May 23, 1873, under the
heading of "An Amiable Consideration of Miss Anthony's Case," said:
United States District Attorney Crowley is a gallant gentleman, as
gallant indeed as District Attorneys can afford to be, but he
confesses himself no match for Miss Anthony. That lady has stumped
Monroe County in behalf of impartial suffrage, and it appears that the
Government very prudently declines to give her case to the jury in
this county. The fact is, it is morally certain that no jury could be
obtained in Monroe that would convict the lady of wrongdoing in
voting, while it is highly probable that four juries out of five would
acquit her.



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