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It is understood, of course, that the Court and
prosecuting officers are merely fulfilling their official functions in
recognizing this departure from ordinary practice at the polls, but
would feel as deeply astonished at a verdict of guilty as the general
public. The District Attorney is fortunate in having as a contestant
(defendant, he would professionally call her) in this friendly little
duel, a lady who is the embodiment of American common sense, courage,
and ability; and we are certain that after this tournament is
adjourned he will accept, with his usual urbanity, the aid of ladies'
ballots to lift him to some other place where his conceded abilities
shall be more widely known.

The New York _Commercial Advertiser_, under the heading, "Miss Anthony
and the Jury of her Peers," said: There is perplexity in the Northern
District of New York. It was in that jurisdiction that Miss Susan B.
Anthony and sundry "erring sisters" voted at the November election.
For this they were arrested and indicted. The venue was laid in Monroe
County and there the trial was to take place. Miss Anthony then
proceeded to stump Monroe County and every town and village thereof,
asking her bucolic hearers the solemn conundrum, "Is it a crime for a
United States citizen to vote?" The answer is supposed generally to be
in the negative, and so convincing is Sister Anthony's rhetoric
regarded that it is supposed no jury can be found to convict her. Her
case has gone to the jurymen of Monroe in her own persuasive pleadings
before they are summoned. The District Attorney has, therefore,
postponed the trial to another term of the Court, and changed the
place thereof to Ontario County; whereupon the brave Susan takes the
stump in Ontario, and personally makes known her woes and wants. It is
a regular St. Anthony's dance she leads the District Attorney; and, in
spite of winter cold or summer heat, she will carry her case from
county to county precisely as fast as the venue is changed. One must
rise very early in the morning to get the start of this active apostle
of the sisterhood.

Rochester _Democrat and Chronicle_: If Miss Anthony has converted
every man in Monroe County to her views of the Suffrage question, as
the District Attorney intimates in his recent efforts to have her case
adjourned, it is pretty good evidence--unless every man in Monroe
County is a fool--that the lady has done no wrong. "Her case," remarks
the Auburn _Bulletin_, "will probably be carried over to another term,
and all she has to do is to canvass and convert another county. A
shrewd woman that! Again we say, she ought to vote."

The Syracuse _Standard_ said: Miss S. B. Anthony is sharp enough for a
successful politician. She is under arrest in Rochester for voting
illegally, and she is conducting her case in a way that beats even
lawyers. She stumped the county of Monroe and spoke in every school
district so powerfully that she has actually converted nearly the
entire male population to the Woman Suffrage doctrine. The sentiment
is so universal that the United States District Attorney dare not
trust his case to a jury drawn from that county, and has changed the
venue to Ontario County. Now Miss Anthony proposes to stump Ontario
immediately, and has procured the services of Mrs. Matilda Joslyn
Gage, of Fayetteville, to assist her. By the time the case comes on
Miss Anthony will have Ontario County converted to her doctrines.

The Rochester _Union and Advertiser_ quoted the above and commented as
follows: We give in another column to-day, from a legal friend, a
communication which shows very clearly that Miss Anthony is engaged in
a work that will be likely to bring her to grief. It is nothing more
nor less than an attempt to corrupt the source of that justice, under
law, which flows from trial by jury. Miss Anthony's case has passed
from its gayest to its gravest character. United States Courts are not
stages for the enactment of comedy or farce, and the promptness and
decision of their judges in sentencing to prison culprits convicted
before them shows that they are no respecters of persons.


SUSAN B. ANTHONY AS A CORRUPTIONIST.

_To the Editors of the Union and Advertiser:_

Gentlemen--I saw this morning with equal surprise and regret in the
_Democrat and Chronicle_ the following article:

"We understand that Miss Susan B. Anthony, in company with Mrs.
Matilda Joslyn Gage, intends to lecture through Ontario County. She is
confident that by June 16th a jury of twelve men can not be found in
that county who will render a verdict of guilty against the women who
are to be tried for illegal voting at the last fall election."

I had learned from the same source that Miss Anthony had made such an
effort in Monroe County, and it was stated elsewhere that her trial
had been sent thence to Ontario County by reason of such efforts to
persuade juries of the justice of her cause. I can scarcely credit
these statements.

Reduced to simple terms, it is an attempt by public lectures and
female influence, by an accused party so to affect jurors 'that a jury
of twelve men can not be found in that county who will render a
verdict of guilty.' If this may be a part of the administration of
justice, then the United States Attorney may by similar or other means
attempt beforehand to secure an opposite result; and the
administration of justice is brought into contempt, and corruption has
entered the jury-box.... There is a statute and common law offense
known as embracery, which is defined to consist "in such practices as
lead to affect the administration of justice, _improperly working upon
the minds of jurors_." It seems clear, adds Russell in his Treatise on
Laws and Misdemeanors, 'that _any attempt whatever to corrupt or
influence or instruct a jury in the cause beforehand, or any way
incline them to be more favorable to the one side than the other_, by
money, letters, threats, or _persuasions_, EXCEPT ONLY by the strength
of evidence and the arguments of the counsel in OPEN COURT AT THE
TRIAL OF THE CAUSE, is a proper act of EMBRACERY, whether the jurors
upon whom the attempt is made _give any verdict or not_, and whether
the verdict given be true or false.' ... I trust no merely temporary
excitement in respect to female suffrage will lead good citizens to
sanction any attempt whatever to influence jurors out of Court, either
before or during the trial of a cause. It is alike an insult to the
juror and an imputation on our public virtue.

LEX.
_May 24, 1873._


[New York _Sun_, Saturday, January 4, 1873].

GOING TO JAIL FOR VOTING FOR GRANT.

The arrest of the fifteen women of Rochester, and the imprisonment of
the renowned Miss Susan B. Anthony, for voting at the November
election, afford a curious illustration of the extent to which the
United States Government is stretching its hand in these matters. If
these women violated any law at all by voting, it was clearly a
statute of the State of New York, and that State might be safely left
to to vindicate the majesty of its own laws. Is is only by an
overstrained construction of the XIV. and XV. Amendments, that the
National Government can force its long finger into the Rochester case
at all.

But so it is. Eager to crowd in and regulate the elections at every
poll In the Union, the power at Washington strikes down a whole State
Government in Louisiana, and holds to bail a handful of women in New
York. Nothing can escape its eye or elude its grasp. It can soar high;
it can stoop low. It can enjoin a Governor in New Orleans; it can jug
a woman in Rochester. Nothing is too big for it to grapple with;
nothing is too small for it to meddle with.... By the by, we advise
Miss Anthony not to go to jail. Perhaps she feels that she deserves
some punishment for voting for General Grant, but it is a bailable
offense. "Going to jail for the good of the cause" may do for poetry,
but it becomes very prosaic when reduced to practice. Let Miss Anthony
enter into bonds, adjust her spectacles, face her accusers, and argue
her own case.

The Worcester _Spy_ said: Miss Susan B. Anthony, whatever else she may
be, is evidently of the right stuff for a reformer. Of all the woman
suffragists she has the most courage and resource, and fights her own
and her sisters' battle with the most wonderful energy, resolution,
and hopefulness. It is well known that she is now under indictment for
voting illegally in Rochester last November. Voting illegally in her
case means simply voting, for it is held that women can not lawfully
vote at all. She is to be tried soon, but in the meantime, while at
large on bail, she has devoted her time to missionary work on behalf
of woman suffrage, and has spoken, it is said, in almost every school
district in Monroe County, where her trial would have been held in the
natural course of things. She has argued her cause so well that almost
all the male population of the county has been converted to her views
on this subject. The District Attorney is afraid to trust the case to
a jury from that county, and has obtained a change of venue to Ontario
on the ground that a fair trial can not be had in Monroe.

Miss Anthony, rather cheered than discouraged by this unwilling
testimony to the strength of her cause and her powers of persuasion,
has made arrangements to canvass Ontario County as thoroughly as
Monroe. As county lines do not inclose distinct varieties of the human
race, it is fair to presume that the people of the former county will
be as susceptible to argument and appeal, as those of the latter, and
by the time the case comes on, an Ontario jury will be as little
likely to convict as a Monroe jury is now supposed to be. Some foolish
and bigoted people who edit newspapers, are complaining that Miss
Anthony's proceedings are highly improper, inasmuch as they are
intended to influence the decision of a cause pending in the courts.
They even talk about contempt of court, and declare that Miss Anthony
should be compelled to desist from making these invidious harangues.
We suspect that the courts will not venture to interfere with this
lady's speech-making tour, but will be of the opinion that she has the
same right which other people, male or female, have to explain her
political views, and make converts to them if she can.



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