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We have never
known it claimed before that a person accused of an offense was
thereby deprived of the common right of free speech on political and
other questions.

The New York _Evening Post_ said: The proceedings of the Circuit Court
of the United States at Canandaigua yesterday, before which Miss Susan
B. Anthony was on trial for voting in Rochester at the late general
election, were very remarkable. Hitherto the advocates of the right of
our countrywomen to vote have hardly obtained a hearing, but Miss
Anthony has made an important step in advance. It is a great gain to
obtain a judicial hearing for her cause; to have the merits of woman
suffrage carefully considered by careful and able men. The appearance
of so eminent and distinguished a lawyer as Henry R. Selden in her
defense will give to the question a new aspect in the minds of the
people. The position he took is still more encouraging to those who
think that women have a legal right to vote. The distinction he made
between the absoluteness of this right and the belief of Miss Anthony
that she possessed such a right, since the guilt relates only to the
legal guilt in this particular instance, is of no general importance;
but his emphatic testimony, irrespective of the present case, that all
women have both an absolute and a legal right to vote, is a fact to
command attention.

So convinced was Judge Selden of the validity of this opinion, that
for the second time in his professional life, as he himself said, he
was compelled to offer himself as a witness in behalf of his client.
Being sworn, he testified that before the defendant voted she called
on him for advice as to her legal right to vote; that he took time to
examine the question very carefully, and then advised her that "she
was as much a voter as I or any other man"; that he believed then that
she had a legal right to vote, and he believed so now, and on that
advice she voted. It seems likely that the decision of the Court will
be in Miss Anthony's favor. If such be the result the advocates of
woman suffrage will change places with the public. They will no longer
be forced to obtain hearings from Congressional and Legislative
Committees for their claims, but will exercise their right to vote by
the authority of a legal precedent against which positive laws
forbidding them from voting will be the only remedy. It is a question
whether such laws can be passed in this country. A careful examination
of the subject must precede any such legislation, and, the inference
from the result of Judge Selden's investigation is that the more the
subject is studied the less likely will any legislative body be to
forbid those women who want to vote from so doing.


[The Rochester _Evening Express_, June 21st.]

THE NATIONAL CASES AT CANANDAIGUA.

The trial of Miss Anthony at Canandaigua on a charge of having voted
illegally on the 5th of November last, in this city, has attracted
attention throughout this country and in England. It was a great
National trial, intended as Judge Hunt said, as the purpose of the act
of voting in this case, to settle a principle. The eminence of the
judge presiding and the reputation of the counsel engaged in the case,
gave it further significance. All the counsel won new laurels in this
contest. Judge Selden could scarcely increase the respect for his
character and legal ability by any fresh contest in the forum, but he
evinced the power of his logical faculties and his perfect
acquaintance with law and legal precedent in his closely reasoned
argument. Mr. Crowley, United States District Attorney, made a very
able argument in reply, which all agree was worthy of his high
position and of the cause in which he appeared for the Government. Mr.
Van Voorhis showed legal erudition careful examination of the case in
hand, and of the law and decision of courts bearing upon it, making
bold and strong points which commanded the attention and respect of
the Court, and elicited the approbation of clients and people.


[_Commercial Advertiser_, June 18, 1873.]

THE FEMALE SUFFRAGISTS.

When a jurist as eminent as Judge Henry R. Selden testifies that he
told Miss Anthony before election that she had a right to vote, and
this after a careful examination of the question, the whole subject
assumes new importance, and Mr. Selden at once becomes the central
object of adoration by all the gentle believers in woman's right to
the ballot. And when the same able lawyer advocates the cause of Miss
Anthony in the United States Courts, there is abundant reason why
other men, both lay and legal, should put themselves in an attitude,
at least of willingness to change their convictions upon this topic,
which now threatens to take on very enlarged proportions. The points
made in the argument by Mr. Selden are that the defendant had a legal
right to vote; that even if no such right existed, if she believed she
had such right and voted in good faith, that she committed no offense;
and lastly, he argued that she did vote in pursuance of such belief.
The point that Miss Anthony had acted illegally only because she was a
woman, was well put. Had her brother, under the same circumstances
done the same thing, his act would have been not only innocent but
laudable. The crime was, therefore, not in the act done, but in the
sex of the person who did it. Women, remarked the Judge, have the same
interest in the maintenance of good government as men. No greater
absurdity, to use no harsher term, can be presented to the human mind
than that of rewarding men and punishing women for the same act,
without giving women any voice in the question of which shall be
rewarded and which punished. How grateful to Judge Selden must all the
suffragists be! He has struck the strongest and most promising blow in
their behalf that has yet been given. Dred Scott was the pivot on
which the Constitution turned before the war. Miss Anthony seems
likely to occupy a similar position now.


[From _Democrat and Chronicle_, Rochester, July, 1873.]

WOMEN'S MEETING.

A meeting of the women's tax-payers' association was held at the
Mayor's office yesterday afternoon, the President, Mrs. Lewia C.
Smith, in the chair. It had been expected that Judge Selden would
address the meeting, but in consequence of professional engagements he
had been unable to prepare such an address as he desired, but will
speak at a future meeting.

Miss Susan B. Anthony was present, and addressed the meeting. She
stated that she had received many letters urging her not to be
disheartened by the result of her case, and she assured all that she
was far from being discouraged. In fact, she considered that they had
won a victory by showing to the world that in order to accomplish her
defeat the courts were obliged to set aside everything, even the
sacred right of trial by jury. Miss Anthony read extracts from letters
received from Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Parker Pillsbury. Mrs.
Stanton pours out her indignation in a letter to Mrs. Gage and Miss
Anthony thus:

"To have my right to the earth and the fullness thereof equally with
man; to do my work and say my say without his let or hindrance, or
even question, has filled me with indignation ever since I began to
think; and one more act of puny legislation, in line with all that has
been done in the past, does not add a feather's weight to my chronic
indignation.

"The insult of being tried by men--judges, lawyers, juries, all
men--for violating the laws and constitutions of men, made for the
degradation and subjugation of my whole sex; to be forever publicly
impaled by the unwavering finger of scorn, by party press, and pulpit,
so far transcends a petty verdict of a petty judge in a given case,
that my continuous wrath against the whole dynasty of tyrants in our
political, religious, and social life, has not left one stagnant drop
of blood in my veins to rouse for any single act of insult.

"The outrage of trying intelligent, educated, well-bred, native-born
American women by juries of men, made up of the riff-raff from the
monarchies and empires of the old world, or ignorant natives of the
new, who do not read the newspapers, nor form opinions on current
events or United States citizens' rights, so overtops the insult of
any verdict they could possibly render, that indignation at what they
might say is swallowed up in the outrage that they have the right to
say anything in limiting the rights of women as citizens in this
republic. What are Centennials and Fourth of Julys to us, when our
most sacred rights can be made foot-balls for the multitude. Do not,
therefore, argue from my silence, that I do not feel every fresh stab
at womanhood. Instead of applying lint to the wounds, my own thought
has been, how can we wrest the sword from the hand of the tyrant."

The following resolutions were then offered and adopted:

_Resolved_, That the gross outrage committed in the case of Miss
Anthony by the United States Circuit Court, the stamping under foot by
Justice Hunt of the Constitution of the United States, and all the
forms of law, in order to defeat a woman who could not be defeated
otherwise, has in no way discouraged the true friends of woman
suffrage, but to the contrary, the unjustifiable means to which the
Court was compelled to resort in order to convict Miss Anthony has not
only aroused the old woman's rights women into new life and action,
but shocked all thinking minds throughout the country, to a
consideration of the vital question of American citizenship. Does it,
or does it not give to the possessor the right to vote?

_Resolved_, That we arraign Ward Hunt, a Justice of the Supreme Court
of the United States, for high crimes and misdemeanors in his office,
committed on the trial of Susan B. Anthony, on a charge of knowingly
voting illegally for a representative in Congress. He denied the right
of trial by jury; he refused to permit her counsel to address the jury
in her behalf; he refused the request of her counsel that the jury be
polled; he directed the clerk to enter a verdict of guilty without
consulting the jury; he had prejudged her case, and had written his
opinion against her before he came to the Court, or had heard the
evidence, or the arguments of her counsel.



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